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Abstract

Contemporary architectural transparency, understood as the optical property of the construction material, is constantly being redefined and, over the last two decades, new design trends have developed. These trends are the result of: (i) dynamic technological progress; (ii) advancement in the field of materials science; (iii) changes in the attitude of clients and users. Transparency is no longer limited to specific functions (e.g. illumination of the interior) but has become a tool of formal expression itself. This paper defines most recent trends, which are divided into two main types: (i) optical-perceptual – relying on phenomenal effects, (ii) geometrical – that differentiate the large group of spatial transformations developed from what was initially flat planar façade.

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is the analysis of the business environment in the coastal area of Tulcea county, by administrative-territorial units, with the help of a synthetic indicator to appreciate the economic-financial performance, the profit rate. The analysis was performed for year 2018, the economic phenomena and processes being captured at the spatial level. The results obtained from this work support the strategy for the rehabilitation of the coastal zone in order to increase the economic performances by adopting policies corresponding to the new realities.

Summary

This article explores how audience participation practices were introduced into Lithuanian theatre in the last three decades (between the early ‘90s and the late 2010s) and how the audience participation methods of the 1960s Western theatre are/were being implemented into contemporary Lithuanian theatre projects. The key goal of this article is to examine the evolution of audience participation and collective theatre tradition in Lithuanian theatre by analysing the preconditions for participatory practices in the country’s theatre scene and defining the scope and contradictions of participation in the latest examples of contemporary Lithuanian theatre practices. These contradictions are also apparent in contemporary Western performative practices, which have already distanced themselves from the collective theatre movement of the ‘60s and the ‘70s and the political agenda of the performances of that time, selectively retaining only limited participatory aspects of the environmental theatre culture as a new form of entertainment. Similar limited levels of participation in Lithuanian theatre can be based on a different premise—that changes in spectators’ habitude cannot catch up with the newly (re)introduced theatrical ideas after the 1990s, and that theatre creators are still trying to cautiously synchronise conventional observation tactics and modern theatre hierarchies with the interactive ones, thus slowing down changes in staging and spectatorship strategies as well.

The article focuses on academic texts by Lithuanian theatre researchers Ramunė Balevičiūtė, Rasa Vasinauskaitė, Rūta Mažeikienė, Jurgita Staniškytė, Vaidas Jauniškis, Lina Michelkevičė, and others to illustrate the discourse of audience participation analysis and to present different stages of the participatory tradition in the historiography of Lithuanian theatre. For international context, history, and mechanics of audience participation, texts by Erika Fischer-Lichte, Michael Kirby, Richard Schechner, Gareth White, Gay McAuley, Johan Huizinga, and others are used.

Summary

The article employs concepts of time lag, inspired by Ernst Bloch, and ghost and haunting, borrowed from Jacques Derrida. It also draws on Svetlana Boym’s and Vilém Flusser’s vision of the émigré and on Dominick LaCapra’s and Slavoj Žižek’s interpretations of trauma. The analysis is also informed by Karen Jürs-Munby’s and Cathy Caruth’s views on trauma and its representation in theatre.

This critical apparatus is put into motion in the particular context of BANDIT: a theatre project developed in the UK by two Romanian émigré theatre-makers. The main focus is on exposing links between the references to trauma contained in the theatre piece BANDIT and the makers’ self-imposed artistic exile in the UK. The article seeks to answer the following question: what has pushed us, the makers of BANDIT, to leave our native country and what is our (new) role (as artists) in the country of emigration? The discussion is carried out within the wider context of the vast waves of Romanian emigration to Western Europe (after the fall of the Iron Curtain). The article critiques the troublesome relation of the contemporary Romanian society to its Communist past and the apparent inability and/or unwillingness to deal with the repressed/traumatic memories of that past. Analysis of BANDIT as performance of lingering trauma also references the historical Percentages agreement between Stalin and Churchill—the informal agreement that established spheres of influence in Europe at the end of the Second World War. Identifying the Iron Curtain as the epicentre of traumatic memory for Eastern Europeans, the discussion about BANDIT also makes a reference to Communist crimes against political prisoners committed in Romanian prisons in 1951–1952, put in parallel with the toxic EU referendum campaign in the UK in 2016. Underpinned by Derrida’s thinking, the article explains how the Romanian émigré-artist (as a paragon of the Romanian / Eastern European émigré in general) has to fashion herself into a ghost that haunts the adoptive culture, using artistic exile as a platform for processing the traumatic memories of an unresolved past.

Abstract

The nineteenth century was a period of ground-breaking events in the history of humanity relating to the industrial revolution, scientific discoveries, knowledge development and social changes. It was also a time when new types of commercial buildings were being formed and transformations of those that had existed for centuries were taking place. The aim of this article is to present the problems of the Central Market Hall in Budapest by Samu Pecz and compare its architectural solutions with selected nineteenth-century constructions serving the same purpose elsewhere in Europe.

Summary

Lithuanian theatre has always been known for its visual metaphors and dramaturgy of directorial images, where the language of literary text is translated into visual metaphors created on stage by a director. Due to this quality, some critics have argued that Lithuanian theatre has been demonstrating postdramatic characteristics for a long time. However, one should note that visual metaphors of modern Lithuanian theatre have been based on and controlled by literary text and never quite established a more autonomous and self-contained visuality. Dramatic text remained the point of departure whether the director chose to illustrate or concretise it, to transform or deform it. However, in post-Soviet Lithuanian theatre, these relations have been gradually turning discontinuous, their intensity often varied within the framework of the same performance. Fragmentary cracks, when images, departed from the roles of commentators or illustrators of textual meanings, turned into flashes of independent visions that were seen by the critics as an obvious shift towards a radical image-centric position or, to use the term of Hans-Thies Lehmann, postdramatic theatre. However, the recent performance Lokis (2017, Lithuanian National Drama Theatre) by Polish theatre artist Lukasz Twarkowski, produced twenty years after the initial introduction of the term postdramatic into the Lithuanian context, has paradoxically started a storm of divisive opinions in the Lithuanian theatre milieu. It became the focal point of discussions about the intrinsic character of Lithuanian theatre, especially its embedded attitudes towards drama text and acting—notoriously challenging factors for many international collaborations. The article analyses the ongoing debates about the term postdramatic theatre and its interpretations in Lithuanian theatre criticism, taking the example of Lokis as a case study.

Abstract

In order for a project to be built with respect to quality, budget compliance and execution time - all required conditions, a professional management of site-level operations is required. The technical complexity, the importance of performing the work on the set deadline, the resource constraints and the substantial costs require the planning, programming and rigorous control of all the works.

Abstract

The coastline of Zemmouri Bay on the northeast coast of Algeria with about 50 km of shoreline has been eroding since 1970. Changes of the sandy shoreline are continuous and occur at diverse spatial and temporal scales. This erosion is a major crisis and it potentially impacts the coastal population and natural environment. In order to understand and predict these morphological changes, an accurate description of sediment transport by waves and currents and shoreline change is important. This paper presents a comprehensive study of wave refraction, current-driven sediment transport and shoreline change. Results show that the study area exhibits a great variety of shoreline evolution trends, with erosion prevailing in the eastern and central sectors and stability or even accretion in the Western area.

Abstract

This article presents a method for the quick assessment of the safety of the road on an active landslide on the Just mountain at Tęgoborze using the landslide hazard ratio of landslide movements. The hazard indicator for landslide traffic has been defined as the quotient of the largest displacements obtained from measurements using a terrestrial laser scanner to the largest displacement obtained from a numerical model of the worst geotechnical conditions and an unstable landslide. The application of this indicator was presented on the example of national road No. 75 along the section of the road in km from 51 + 900 to 52 + 700 at the location of the Just mountain at Tęgoborze in the south of Poland. The road is located on an active landslide and has a lot of traffic. The measurements were conducted with the RIEGL. VZ400 terrestrial laser scanner from 2012 to 2016. As a result of the measurements performed with a terrestrial laser scanner, a cloud of 3D points was obtained. Differential models of subsequent measurements were constructed and compared to the first base measurements. The results of 3D differential models obtained from terrestrial laser scanner measurements were compared with results obtained from 3D numerical modelling. Numerical calculations were conducted assuming the worst geotechnical conditions. The model of the landslide was fully saturated. A numerical simulation computed using the finite element method (FEM) in the MIDAS GTS program was applied. A result of the safety factor F = 0.8 (i.e. an unstable landslide) was obtained. In order to estimate the hazard, the values of the landslide hazard indicator were determined for each date using the measurements conducted with the laser scanner.

Abstract

Zakopane is a regional tourist city that is unique on the national scale. It is a one of a kind mountain resort with an exceptional history and atmosphere. It is a fashionable place where visitors can both rest and test themselves. It currently requires not only sustainable development but also that the effects of negligence and its deficiencies in spheres required for it to comfortably function be addressed, in addition to the supplementation of its offering both in terms of use and culture. The small-scale architecture of the Podhale region must rise to contemporary challenges. Presenting underground projects from all over the world aids in raising awareness as to the development potential of the area, demonstrating one of the paths to solving the problems of overburdened cities. Examples show means of relieving the pressure of current needs, simultaneously relieving the above-ground service programme of cities and increasing the amounts of greenery at their disposal.