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Safety of concomitant treatment with Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants and SSRI/SNRI antidepressants

Abstract

Introduction: Warfarin has been considered as a “gold standard” in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events since 1954. Since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in the last few years (NOAC-Non-Vitamin K antagonist Oral Anticoagulants) prescriptions volume for apixaban, edoxaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban have been gradually surpassing warfarin. The benefits include: anticoagulation from day one, fixed daily dosing, elimination for the need of international normalised ratio (INR) monitoring, fewer interactions with food and co-administered medicines with reduced risk of bleeding and better overall life quality.

Objectives: Assessing evidence for the safe use of Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) and Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRI).

Method: Review of literature published between 2014 and 2016 was made using the key words: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor, Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, bleeding, interaction, depression with time description from 2014 to 2018. Evidence within the literature was then compared with guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (UK), British National Formulary (UK), Clinical Excellence Commission (Australia), Thrombophilia and Anticoagulation Clinic (USA) and Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPC).

Results: 1. Serotonin plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis. Use of SSRI/SNRI compromises its platelet reuptake increasing risk of bleeding. 2. Increased tolerability and safety of NOAC over Warfarin, although caution is advised when NOAC is used with SSRI/SNRI with less evidence suggesting pharmacodynamic interactions. 3. It is not recommended to use NOAC with strong CYP and P-gp inhibitors.

Conclusions: With limited literature evidence, caution is advised when co-prescribed NOACs with SSRI/SNRI, especially with other cofactors and interacting medicines further increasing risk of bleeding.

Open access
Transforming Transition: enhancing practice in haemophilia

Abstract

Transition is the term used to describe the process of approaching and crossing the chronological boundary between paediatric and adult care services. Transfer of care describes the administrative arrangements associated with moving from a paediatric to an adult service across this boundary. Transforming Transition was a nurse-led initiative designed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience to enhance transition practice in the UK. The aims of the programme were to secure changes in working practices that enabled nurses to drive improved transition outcomes, enhance self-management by people with haemophilia and develop clinical leadership. From the outset of the programme it was clear that there were differences in practice and that sharing practice would be one route to addressing some of these variations. As a result of the knowledge and experience shared through the programme, resources described in this paper are available to all haemophilia centres. Sharing between people with haemophilia, their families and carers, and the haemophilia clinical team have resulted in the development of practical resources that enhance practice within the haemophilia centre. Sharing of practice between nurses and young people with haemophilia at the programme workshops provided a focus for development of local and regional action plans, a framework for reviewing progress, the introduction of transition clinics and improved transition documentation.

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A transgender person with haemophilia

Abstract

Introduction: Transgender people face many obstacles to accessing healthcare but cultural changes are likely to increase provision of sex reassignment surgery in countries with sufficient resources. Haemophilia services traditionally focus on providing factor replacement therapy for males and should therefore understand how the care they provide can be adapted to meet the needs of transgender people. Haemophilia is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder, caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (haemophilia A) or factor IX (haemophilia B). The condition is passed on through carrier females, the majority of whom have a factor level high enough to allow for normal blood clotting. However, around 10% of carrier females are symptomatic and at risk of abnormal bleeding. Case presentation: This case report describes a person with mild haemophilia A who, on first presentation to the haemophilia service, stated he was a transgender person in transition to becoming a male. Haemophilia was diagnosed when heavy bleeding occurred following bilateral mastectomy approximately 25 years previously. He now requested phalloplasty. Management and outcome: Phalloplasty was performed at a hospital geographically separate from the haemophilia centre, requiring careful coordination between the two services. A haemophilia specialist nurse provided education and training about haemophilia and its management to the surgical nurses. Twenty-four-hour support was available from the nurse and a specialist doctor. Preparation and administration of clotting factor was the responsibility of the haemophilia nurse until the surgical team was confident in its use. Clotting factor replacement was managed using standard procedures, successfully maintaining factor VIII above a target level of 100% with a twice daily dose. Surgery went well, but wound healing was delayed, in part, due to persistent bleeding. Discussion: Close collaboration between the haemophilia and surgical teams provided effective prophylaxis of bleeding during a complex

procedure that presented new challenges. Both services now have better understanding of the needs of transgender people.

Open access
Uncommon psychopathological syndromes in psychiatry

Abstract

Introduction: The development of biological sciences, as well as cultural and civilizational changes have led to the emergence of practice within the medicine of science, called psychiatry. Already at the turn of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, Karl Jaspers - a German scholar - father of psychopathology - in the work “Allgemeine Psychopathologie” crystallized his intuitions in the field of psychopathology, which classifies and describes states that are deviations from the physiological mental state of a human being.

Material and method: his paper reviews available literature to approximate the symptoms of the most interesting psychopathological syndromes in psychiatry such as: Clerambault syndrome, Otheller syndrome, Cotard syndrome, Ekboma syndrome and Folie à deux.

Results: A multitude of psychopathological syndromes results from the wealth of survival of psychiatric patients. They represent the delusions of different contents that develop in a primitive way or as a consequence of other types of disorders. Psychopathological teams have been inspiring the poets and directors for centuries. The relationship between psychiatry and culture, film and literature undoubtedly testifies to its interdisciplinary nature.

Discussion: Despite the passage of time, the descriptions of these syndromes with a rich historical description, symptomatology and criteria have not lost their relevance and are still a clinical reality.

Open access
You think you know the patient inside-out. But do you know the outside-in?

Abstract

Haemophilia impacts on the person who has it as well as his close family and friends. The majority of healthcare provider focus is with the person with haemophilia and his carers during childhood, and then on the person himself as he becomes able to self-manage. There is a belief that the family and healthcare team support the patient equally. In this study, which was designed to understand the patient/ carer/healthcare provider relationship, we investigated support mechanisms from the patient’s perspective, using narrative stories from those we call ‘witnesses’. Carers, family and friends rarely feature in haemophilia research, yet can provide in-depth insight into the life of the person with haemophilia. Three key areas were identified which underlie and cause tension in the world of haemophilia. These are described as ‘identity and tackling the lion’, ‘the haemophilia team’ and ‘the unique perspective and influence of the ‘outside-in’. Support from the ‘outside-in’ as well as healthcare providers is important for people with haemophilia for both physical and psychological health. Working together we can better support individuals with haemophilia as well as other members of their extended families. As haemophilia care changes in a new era of therapeutic options; we need to re-evaluate the supportive role of family and carers to ensure that the patient and family voice is heard in decision-making at an individual and national level.

Open access
Young people’s experience of transition from paediatric to adult haemophilia care in the UK

Abstract

People with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders, such as von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD), are frequently diagnosed in childhood. There is, therefore, a recognised need to prepare children and young people with these conditions for transfer to long-term care in the adult sector. The Transforming Transition programme was designed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience to enhance transition practice in the UK. The aim of the programme was to secure change in working practices to enable nurses to drive improved transition outcomes, enhance self-management by people with haemophilia and develop clinical leadership. As part of the programme, we captured young people’s views of their transition experiences by means of a series of structured interviews conducted with young people identified through the patient association. Interviews revealed that transition tended to take place around the age of 16 but could be delayed in response to individual circumstances. The transition process did not always appear to be planned, with many participants reporting an abrupt or sudden change between paediatric and adult teams and/or centres. Those with severe haemophilia tended to be well educated and prepared by their paediatric teams to be confident in managing their condition from an early age. They would learn to self-infuse between the ages of 5-11, and reported feeling confident in tailoring their treatment around their daily routine. Experience of transition to adult services varied, with about half describing it as fairly well planned. For those with bleeding disorders such as vWD, there was rarely a transition process. These individuals and people with mild haemophilia described having less exposure to opportunities to learn self-management and appeared to experience issues which coincided with significant lifestyle changes, such as leaving home and attending university. This highlights the importance of ensuring that patients across the spectrum of bleeding disorders are adequately supported in the lead-up to and transfer to adult services. The interviews also reinforce the need to continue to address the specific needs of women with bleeding disorders as they transfer to adult services. The learning from this phase of the Transforming Transition programme was submitted to NICE as part of the consultation on its guideline.

Open access
Nurse-led telephone review service for mild inherited bleeding disorders improves attendance rates, frees hospital resources and is highly rated by patients

Abstract

Introduction and objective: In the UK, the National Service Specification for haemophilia stipulates that all patients with mild inherited bleeding disorders must be reviewed annually by their haemophilia centre. For those patients who rarely experience problems relating to their bleeding disorder, attending a yearly hospital-based appointment may be viewed as a low priority. This can result in missed appointments and disconnection from their haemophilia centre, leading to poor understanding of how to manage their condition in emergencies, or when surgical or other invasive procedures may be necessary. The inherited nature of these conditions also has implications for reproduction, and it is of vital importance that the risk of bleeding around labour, delivery and the neonatal period are fully understood and mitigated against. The introduction of a structured, nurse-led telephone clinics across the North London Adult Haemophilia Network (NLAHN) offered an alternative method for patients to be reviewed. This strategy was then evaluated to assess whether the needs of patients were being fulfilled. Materials and methods: Clinical nurse specialists (CNS) from the NLAHN devised a short service evaluation questionnaire with Likert scales and one open question. Patients across the NLAHN sites who had received a telephone review in 2016 were sent an anonymised questionnaire, with a stamped addressed envelope and a six-week return date. Results: 514 questionnaires were distributed, 174 were returned, and 18 were excluded as returned incomplete, giving a return rate of 28%. Overall, 89% (139/156) of patients rated the new service between excellent and very good; 89% (139/156) reported that they were very satisfied with the information received in the review; and 95% (149/156) were happy to continue to receive telephone reviews. Conclusion: Patients found the telephone reviews a viable alternative to traditional hospital-based appointments. The telephone clinics are more convenient for patients in terms of time and resources; they also helped those surveyed to re-engage with their haemophilia centre, ensuring continued education about their condition and the services offered. Overall attendance rates for the follow-up of patients with mild bleeding disorders have improved, with a reduction in traditional clinic appointments for this group. This has an ongoing positive impact on waiting lists and the financial burden of missed hospital appointments without impacting patient care.

Open access
Pain self-management experiences in haemophilia patients: a qualitative study

Abstract

Background: Pain management can prevent long-term burdens in haemophilia patients and improve their quality of life. The present study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences in haemophilia patients, focusing on pain self-management in their lives. Methods: This was a qualitative study undertaken using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The study involved 14 haemophilia patients referred to a haemophilia clinic affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and field notes. Thematic analysis with van Manen’s methodological framework was applied. Data analysis was performed using MAX. QDA qualitative software (2010). Results: Four themes emerged: a sense of self-awareness and recognition of pain and the factors that affect it, the ability to control and self-manage pain, gradually achieving self-efficacy in pain control, and using cognitive and spiritual strategies for pain relief. Conclusions: The study highlighted the essence of the lived experience of pain self-management and generated its linguistic description. By providing complementary therapy interventions, healthcare providers and family members could increase patients’ self-awareness, recognition, ability to self-manage and control pain effectively, and competence in developing cognitive and spiritual strategies for pain relief.

Open access
Comparison of selected clinical and personality variables in alcohol–dependent patients with or without a history of suicide attempts

Summary

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine differences in the range of socio-demographic variables, selected clinical variables, temperament and character traits, coping with stress strategies and the level of aggression in alcohol addicts with or without a history of suicide attempt(s).

Methods: The study involved 90 people addicted to alcohol, treated in inpatient alcohol dependence treatment program. In order to collect data on socio - demographic variables and selected clinical variables, a self-made questionnaire was used. The severity of alcohol dependence was verified using the MAST and SADD scales. Characteristics of temperament and character were examined with the TCI questionnaire. The BPAQ and COPE questionnaires were used to examine the level of aggression and styles of coping with stress.

Results:Out of 90 subjects with alcohol dependence syndrom, 20% had attempted suicide in the past. The respondents with a history of suicide attempts were statistically significantly younger, were characterized by a younger age of alcohol drinking initiation and the initiation of regular alcohol drinking, and a greater severity of alcohol dependence in the MAST and SADD scales. A significantly larger percentage of respondents who had attempted suicide inflicted self-injury in the past, used other psychoactive substances as well as hypnotics and sedatives. The subjects with a suicide attempt in the interview obtained statistically significantly higher scores in terms of the level of aggression, harm avoidance and self-directedness, and more often used the style of coping with stress based on avoidance and accepting the situation.

Conclusions: The obtained results correspond with data available in the literature and may provide a foundation for theoretical models explaining the phenomenon of suicidal behavior in alcohol addicts as well as for suicide prevention programs in this group of patients.

Open access
Obstetric complications in women with schizophrenia

Summary

Pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood are new situations for women and require adjustment. Women suffering from schizophrenia require special attention due to the course of the disease. Physiological changes that occur in the body during pregnancy may be unacceptable for women suffering from schizophrenia. They may delusively deny the existence of the pregnancy, lead an unhealthy lifestyle (stimulants, poor diet, lack of gynaecological check-ups), which in turn causes an increased risk of complications. In the research conducted so far, it has been proven that three kinds of complications are associated with schizophrenia: complications concerning pregnancy itself (bleeding, diabetes, Rh-incompatibility, pre-eclampsia), intrauterine growth restriction (low birth weight, congenital malformations, small head circumference) and complications regarding labour (uterine atony, asphyxia, emergency Caesarean section). The course of the labour itself in this specific group of patients has not yet been sufficiently examined. It has also been proven that perinatal complications are one of the factors determining an increased risk of schizophrenia.

Open access