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A Room of One’s Own?
Using period trackers to escape menstrual stigma

Abstract

This article’s ambition is to study the needs and motives embedded in the everyday usage of period trackers.1 Based on twelve in-depth interviews with Danish women who use period trackers, I explore the connections among menstrual stigma and the usage of period trackers and investigate how digital traces from their datafied2 bodies transmit meaning to their everyday life. The women in the study described how the app provides them with reassurance and privacy, and thus the article finds that 1) period apps are experienced as private, shame-free rooms for exploratory engagement with the menstruating body and 2) the risk of embodied data potentially becoming shareable commodities does not affect the everyday self-tracking practice of these women.

Open access
Self-Presentation of Polish Football Managers on Linkedin

Abstract

Although LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional networking site, the research concerning self-presentation on the platform is limited and fragmented. The main goal of the study was to explore the self-presentation of Polish football managers on LinkedIn in four dimensions: completeness and attractiveness of the profile, network-embeddedness, and activity. Using quantitative content analysis of managers’ profiles (N=319), the research shows that the managers exploit the potential of LinkedIn to build their personal professional brand only in a very limited and mostly static way. In addition, the self-presentation in LinkedIn is the best among managers working in Polish Football Association, improves with the length of professional experience, and shows only slight differences between women and men.

Open access
Structural Ageism in Big Data Approaches

Abstract

Digital systems can track every activity. Their logs are the fundamental raw material of intelligent systems in big data approaches. However, big data approaches mainly use predictions and correlations that often fail in the prediction of minorities or invisibilize collectives, causing discriminatory decisions. While this discrimination has been documented regarding, sex, race and sexual orientation, age has received less attention. A critical review of the academic literature confirms that structural ageism also shapes big data approaches. The article identifies some instances in which ageism is in operation either implicitly or explicitly. Concretely, biased samples and biased tools tend to exclude the habits, interests and values of older people from algorithms and studies, which contributes to reinforcing structural ageism.

Open access
Tracing Communicative Patterns
A comparative ethnography across platforms, media and contexts

Abstract

This article outlines a research design for a qualitative comparative study of communication across platforms, media and contexts – in China, the US and Denmark. After addressing the limitations in previous research on digital media in everyday life, we argue in favour of a comparative ethnography of communication that emphasizes the study of intermediality by taking a people-centred approach. The methodological design combines network sampling and maximum variation sampling with communication diaries and elicitation interviews. This design makes it possible to collect small and deep communicative trace data, to capture individuals’ unique linking of all the communication tools and channels available to them and, in turn, to identify the role of the internet as it interacts and intersects with other forms of communication.

Open access
Unboxing news automation
Exploring imagined affordances of automation in news journalism

Abstract

News automation is an emerging field within journalism, with the potential to transform newswork. Increasing access to data, combined with developing technology, will allow further inquiries into automated journalism. Producing news text using NLG (natural language generation) is currently largely undertaken in specific, predictable news domains, such as sports or finance. This interdisciplinary study investigates how elite media representatives from Finland, Europe and the US imagine the affordances of this emerging technology for their organization. Our analysis shows how the affordances of news automation are imagined as providing efficiency, increasing output and aiding in reallocating resources to pursue quality journalism. The affordances are, however, constrained by such factors as access to structured data, the quality of automation and a lack of relevant skills. In its current form, automated text generation is seen as providing only limited benefits to news organizations that are already imagining further possibilities of automation.

Open access
Walking Through, Going Along and Scrolling Back
Ephemeral mobilities in digital ethnography

Abstract

Spatial metaphors have long been part of the way we make sense of media. From early conceptualizations of the internet, we have come to understand digital media as spaces that support, deny or are subject to different mobilities. With the availability of GPS data, somatic bodily movement has enjoyed significant attention in media geography, but recently innovations in digital ethnographic methods have paid attention to other, more ephemeral ways of moving and being with social media. In this article, we consider three case studies in qualitative, “small data” social media research methods: the walkthrough, the go-along and the scroll back methods. Each is centred on observing navigational flows through app infrastructures, fingers hovering across device surfaces and scrolling-and-remembering practices in social media archives. We advocate an ethnography of ephemeral media mobilities and suggest that small data approaches should analytically integrate four dimensions of mediated mobility: bodies and affect, media objects and environments, memory and narrative, and the overall research encounter.

Open access
Nordic Journal of Media Studies
Journal from the Nordic Information Centre for Media and Communication Research (Nordicom)
Open access
Accident at Work as an Indicator Supporting the Decision Making Process

Abstract

Identification of trends of the examined phenomenon plays a major role in taking decisions and allows conducting a deeper analysis of phenomena connected with the shaping of proper working conditions. One of the result indicators in the OSH system is the accident rate, whose existence is the result of a combination of various events. Seeking tangible economic benefits, decision makers in business entities who wish to improve activities protecting health and life of employees, pay great attention to using quantitative methods and drawing conclusions from them. This is conditioned by the fact that the analysis of the economic aspects of accidents is connected to a large extent with the cost of benefits the employer incurs for the benefit of accident victims. Therefore, the main goal of the article is to examine what impact on the cost of benefits due to accidents at work is exerted by such factors as: the number of related benefits, persons injured in accidents at work depending on the consequences and the number of days of inability to work caused by these accidents. Furthermore, this paper shows changes in costs of accident benefits of persons receiving those benefits due to inability to work caused by accident in business. In order to achieve this, it is proposed to present an econometric analysis based on the cross-section-time data with the dynamics of considered variables in voivodeships in Poland being examined. The study uses the annual data for the years 2010-2017. The data come from the CSO publications.

Open access