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Bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition: influence of a newly implanted cardiac device

Abstract

Current guidelines do not recommend bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) in patients with implanted cardiac devices. There is no data on the influence of such devices over the parameters assessed by BIA. We aimed to assess the influence of cardiac devices on the parameters assessed by BIA as well as to evaluate the likelihood of electromagnetic interference of BIA in patients with implanted cardiac devices. Sixty-two consecutive patients over 18 years of age who underwent single (PM) or multisite (CRT) pacemaker or defibrillator (ICD) implantation were included. Body composition assessment was done using a single frequency device, on both right and left sides, before and after cardiac device implantation. During BIA analysis after device implantation, we did real-time telemetry to assess electromagnetic interference. Patients were 67+14 years old and 51.6% male. PM was implanted in 52 patients (83.9%), ICD in 7 (11.3%), ICD with CRT in 2 (3.2%) and CRT in 1 (1.6%). During real-time telemetry, there was no electromagnetic interference including interruption of telemetry. Default device programming did not change after BIA assessment. After surgery, resistance and fat mass were smaller, while cellular mass, fat-free mass, metabolic rate and total body water/ body weight increased, on right and left sides measurements. We concluded that decreased resistance and related parameters after device implantation were probably influenced to a change in hydration status, regardless of the implanted device. Bioimpedance analysis is safe in patients with an implanted cardiac device.

Open access
Bones, blood and steel: How bioelectrical impedance analysis is affected by hip fracture and surgical implants

Abstract

Introduction

Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is in widespread use, but there is uncertainty about its validity in patients with metal implants or after acute hip fracture and surgery. We aimed to investigate the use of single frequency tetrapolar BIA in patients with hip fracture by answering the following questions: 1) Are BIA measurements affected by recent hip fracture and surgical repair? 2) Are BIA measurements affected by the presence of metal implants used in hip fracture surgery?

Setting

Two hospitals in Bergen, Norway.

Participants

A convenience sample of 203 acute hip fracture patients.

Methods

Participants had their body composition measured by single frequency, tetrapolar BIA on the fractured and unfractured side of the body in the immediate postoperative period and at follow-up three months after hip fracture. Measurements from fractured and unfractured side and measurements in hospital and at follow-up were compared. BIA readings for hips treated with cannulated screws, compression hip screw and hip arthroplasty were compared.

Results

Resistance was lower on the side of the fractured hip compared to the unfractured side postoperatively, but not at follow-up. BIA readings did not differ by type of surgical implant.

Conclusion

Recent fracture and surgery influences single frequency tetrapolar BIA resistance. The presence of surgical implants in the hip do not affect BIA measurements. If BIA is used in acute hip fracture patients, the contralateral side to the fracture should be measured.

Open access
A system to monitor segmental intracellular, interstitial, and intravascular volume and circulatory changes during acute hemodialysis

Abstract

This paper describes a new combined impedance plethysmographic (IPG) and electrical bioimpedance spectroscopic (BIS) instrument and software that allows noninvasive real-time measurement of segmental blood flow and changes in intracellular, interstitial, and intravascular volumes during various fluid management procedures. The impedance device can be operated either as a fixed frequency IPG for the quantification of segmental blood flow and hemodynamics or as a multi-frequency BIS for the recording of intracellular and extracellular resistances at 40 discrete input frequencies. The extracellular volume is then deconvoluted to obtain its intra-vascular and interstitial component volumes as functions of elapsed time. The purpose of this paper is to describe this instrumentation and to demonstrate the information that can be obtained by using it to monitor segmental compartment volumes and circulatory responses of end stage renal disease patients during acute hemodialysis. Such information may prove valuable in the diagnosis and management of rapid changes in the body fluid balance and various clinical treatments.

Open access
Application of genetic algorithm in extracting cell dielectric characteristics with electrorotation

Abstract

In this study the transformed theory is applied to derive the dielectric characteristics of cells, considering the electrorotation (ER) peak frequency. In current studies, estimations of low frequency, which are credible for the values less than 1 mS/m for medium conductivity, are used to obtain the corresponding permittivity and conductivity of cells. Unlike the presented works, the transformed theory applies the comprehensive statement for corresponding permittivity and conductivity of cells. In the transformed theory, the membrane and interior characteristics could be obtained from the high and the low frequencies of peak ER, for all values of conductivity of medium. Characteristics of cells are obtained via optimization of an equation for the conductivity of medium regarding the peak ER frequency. The optimization process is performed applying genetic algorithm due to its swift adaptation to the problem and faster convergence.

Open access
Comparison of cerebrovascular reactivity tests: a pilot human study

Abstract

In neurosurgery intensive care units, cerebrovascular reactivity tests for neuromonitoring are used to evaluate the status of cerebral blood flow autoregulation; lack of autoregulation indicates a poor patient outcome. The goal of neuromonitoring is to prevent secondary injuries following a primary central nervous system injury, when the brain is vulnerable to further compromise due to hypoxia, ischemia and disturbances in cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure. Ideally, neuromonitoring would be noninvasive and continuous. This study compares cerebrovascular reactivity monitored by rheoencephalography, a noninvasive continuous monitoring modality, to cerebrovascular reactivity measured by currently used neuromonitoring modalities: transcranial Doppler, near infrared spectroscopy and laser Doppler flowmetry. Fourteen healthy volunteer subjects were measured. The tests used for comparison of cerebrovascular reactivity were breath-holding, hyperventilation, CO2 inhalation, the Valsalva maneuver, and the Trendelenburg and reverse Trendelenburg positions. Data for all modalities measured were recorded by computers and processed off line. All measured modalities reflected cerebrovascular reactivity with variabilities. Breath-holding, CO2 inhalation, and the Valsalva maneuver caused CO2 increase and consequent brain vasodilatation; hyperventilation caused CO2 decrease and brain vasoconstriction. The Trendelenburg and reverse Trendelenburg positions caused extracranial blood volume changes, which masked intracranial cerebrovascular reactivity. The hyperventilation test proved ineffective for measuring cerebrovascular reactivity with rheoencephalography due to respiratory artifacts. Some discrepancies among the

Open access
Dual modality electrical impedance and ultrasound reflection tomography to improve image quality

Abstract

Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is relatively new. It is a verypromising technique to be developed especially in the medical field. The advantages of EIT are that it is non-ionizing, simple, and portable and that it produces a high contrast image. Unfortunately, this modality does not have the capability to generate a highresolution image. Almost all imaging modalities has both advantages and disadvantages. Combining one modality with another is hence expected to cover the weaknesses of each other. The problem is how to develop the concepts, measurement systems and algorithm of dual modalities, particularly electrical and acoustical. The electrical modality can produce high contrast and the acoustical modality can produce high resolution. Combination of these will enhance the image resolution of EIT. High image resolution from the ultrasound reflection tomography is used as the prior information to improve the image resolution of the EIT. Finite Element Model (FEM) can be arranged by non-uniform elements, which are adapted to the boundary. Element models with higher density are arranged at the boundaries to obtain improvements of resolution and the model elements with lower density arranged at other locations to reduce the computational cost. The dual modality EIT with Ultrasound Reflection (EIT-UR) can produce high resolution and contrast image. The resolution improvement can also accelerate the convergence of the Newton-Raphson reconstruction methods.

Open access
Impedance detection of the electrical resistivity of the wound tissue around deep brain stimulation electrodes permits registration of the encapsulation process in a rat model

Abstract

An animal model of deep brain stimulation (DBS) was used in in vivo studies of the encapsulation process of custom-made platinum/iridium microelectrodes in the subthalamic nucleus of hemiparkinsonian rats via electrical impedance spectroscopy. Two electrode types with 100-μm bared tips were used: i) a unipolar electrode with a 200-μm diameter and a subcutaneous gold wire counter electrode and ii) a bipolar electrode with two parallelshifted 125-μm wires. Miniaturized current-controlled pulse generators (130 Hz, 200 μA, 60 μs) enabled chronic DBS of the freely moving animals. A phenomenological electrical model enabled recalculation of the resistivity of the wound tissue around the electrodes from daily in vivo recordings of the electrode impedance over two weeks. In contrast to the commonly used 1 kHz impedance, the resistivity is independent of frequency, electrode properties, and current density. It represents the ionic DC properties of the tissue. Significant resistivity changes were detected with a characteristic decrease at approximately the 2nd day after implantation. The maximum resistivity was reached before electrical stimulation was initiated on the 8th day, which resulted in a decrease in resistivity. Compared with the unipolar electrodes, the bipolar electrodes exhibited an increased sensitivity for the tissue resistivity.

Open access
Estimation of optimal frequencies for electrical impedance-based diagnosis of osteoporosis based on numerical modeling of cancellous bone tissue

Abstract

In recent years, the degree of spread of osteoporosis in men and women has increased considerably. According to the existing statistics 20 percent of women above the age 50 are suffering from osteoporosis and the degree of its growth has been more among men rather than women. In the following research, a three-dimensional electrical computer model of cancellous bone tissue has been presented which consists of a unit cell made of cortical bone where we adjust the amount of bone density as desired. Using a commercial electromagnetics simulation software, we put the intended piece under the effect of electric field and calculate the electric current and extract the impedance of the tissue. Considering the fact that the electrical properties of the components of the intended piece is different for each frequency, the obtained impedance would be variable with frequency. Changes of the impedance caused by alteration of the bone density, can thus be computationaly estimated and leads to a model-based estimation of impedance sensitivity to changes in bone density. Consequently, it would be advantageous to find a frequency range that causes the highest relative change in the amount of the impedance as bone density is varied. The obtained results in a wide frequency range of 1 kHz – 1 GHz indicated that by the alteration of the bone density from 10 to 30 percent, the highest sensitivity in the electrical properties of cancellous bone occurres at frequencies less than 100 kilohertz.

Open access
Electrical impedance tomography methods for miniaturised 3D systems

Abstract

In this study, we explore the potential of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for miniaturised 3D samples to provide a non-invasive approach for future applications in tissue engineering and 3D cell culturing. We evaluated two different electrode configurations using an array of nine circular chambers (Ø 10 mm), each having eight gold plated needle electrodes vertically integrated along the chamber perimeter. As first method, the adjacent electrode configuration was tested solving the computationally simple back-projection algorithm using Comsol Multiphysics in time-difference EIT (t-EIT). Subsequently, a more elaborate method based on the “polar-offset” configuration (having an additional electrode at the centre of the chamber) was evaluated using linear t-EIT and linear weighted frequency-difference EIT (f-EIT). Image reconstruction was done using a customised algorithm that has been previously validated for EIT imaging of neural activity. All the finite element simulations and impedance measurements on test objects leading to image reconstruction utilised an electrolyte having an ionic strength close to physiological solutions. The chosen number of electrodes and consequently number of electrode configurations aimed at maximising the quality of image reconstruction while minimising the number of required measurements. This is significant when designing a technique suitable for tissue engineering applications where time-based monitoring of cellular behaviour in 3D scaffolds is of interest. The performed tests indicated that the method based on the adjacent configuration in combination with the back-projection algorithm was only able to provide image reconstruction when using a test object having a higher conductivity than the background electrolyte. Due to limitations in the mesh quality, the reconstructed image had significant irregularities and the position was slightly shifted toward the perimeter of the chamber. On the other hand, the method based on the polar-offset configuration combined with the customised algorithm proved to be suitable for image reconstruction when using non-conductive and cell-based test objects (down to 1% of the measurement chamber volume), indicating its suitability for future tissue engineering applications with polymeric scaffolds.

Open access