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Jacob Levy Moreno’s Psychodrama As a Work Technique For Treating Patients in Group and Individual Psychotherapy

Abstract

Introduction. The basic purpose of this article is to present Jacob Levy Moreno’s psychodrama method as the psychotherapeutic technique useful in work with patients during individual and group psychotherapy.

Material and Method: The author presents the analysis of case studies of patients treated in individual and group psychotherapy. He instances the examples of psychodramatic work on the stage as well as monodramatic and reports their importance in the process of patient psychotherapy. He discusses the effects of these act ivities in the context of changes in the emotional and interpersonal functioning of patients.

Results: The given examples of monodrama and psychodramatic works illustrate the mechanisms of the changes offered by the method, e.g. insight, abreaction, acceptance of internal impulses, confrontation with the feelings of other people, training of alternative behaviors. In the article one can follow each subsequent step of analyzing intrapsychic conflicts of patients, which, thanks to the play on the stage, can be named and experienced by them.

Conclusions: Psychodrama, used in the psychotherapeutic work of the group and in individual work with the patient (in the form of a monodrama), gives great opportunities to broaden the insight of the patient into very complicated internal mechanisms of conflicts and deficits. Psychotherapist - leader encourages patients to be creative and to spontaneous development of their blocked personality elements. The specificity of psychodrama is a relatively quick resolution of many years of ongoing conflict and permanent reparation of traumatic experiences, even from early childhood.

Open access
Positive Interventions in the Therapy of Schizophrenia Patients

Abstract

Positive psychology directs its research interests primarily to healthy people. The most important goal is to build a positive attitude towards yourself and the surrounding world. Recently, positive psychology has set a new area of research interest, which is clinical psychology. In recent years, several positive psychotherapy programs have been developed for people with schizophrenia experience. The article presents the latest trends in positive psychotherapy for people with schizophrenia. They involve taking into account the individual differences of each patient and the specificity of his / her psychopathology. As far as the therapeutic goals are concerned, there are interventions focused on strategies for enhancing positive emotions and wellbeing or the method of activating the strengths of character. Taking into account the methods of therapeutic work, they can be divided into training methods or those of the behavioral-cognitive psychotherapy as well as those that take into account the various aspects of meditation. The article presents the distribution of therapeutic programs in terms of the range of therapeutic goals in which the most important are: intensification of positive experiences, building of strengths of character and well-being. Therapeutic programs have been shown to focus not only on breaking down negative attitudes towards one’s own illness and life, but also on those that try to deal with the unsolved schizophrenia problem - negative symptoms.

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Prevalence, pattern and clinical implications of transfusion transmissible viral infections among paediatric haemophiliacs in northern Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Scarcity of FVIII concentrate compels caregivers in poor countries to use multiple transfusions of fresh whole blood (FWB), fresh frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate for managing haemophilia A. FWB is the most frequently transfused blood product due to ease of production and its ability to simultaneously stop active bleeding and treat anaemia. Iron deficiency anaemia is common among haemophiliacs in poor tropical countries such as Nigeria, due to the combined effects of bleeding, malnutrition, and haemorrhagic parasitic diseases. Multiple FWB transfusion is usually initiated at local sub-tertiary hospitals before eventual referral to tertiary hospitals. The Nigerian blood transfusion service is underdeveloped, donor screening is rudimentary and transfusion safety is poor. The prevalence of transfusion transmissible viral infections (TTVIs), including HIV, and hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV), is therefore predicted to be high among Nigerian haemophiliacs. Aims: To determine prevalence and pattern of TTVIs (HIV, HBV, HCV infections) among paediatric haemophiliacs who have received multiple FWB transfusions in Nigeria. Materials and methods: Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data, disease severity, number of previous transfusions of FWB, and prevalence and pattern of TTVIs (HIV, HBV and HCV infections) of newly referred haemophiliacs as seen in five tertiary hospitals in northern Nigeria. Prevalence rates of TTVIs were expressed as percentages. Comparisons of parameters (age, disease severity and number of previous transfusions) between patients with and without TTVIs were performed using Students t-test for mean values and Fisher’s exact test for percentages, with p-values of less than 0.05 taken as significant. Results: Of 97 haemophiliacs studied, 24 (24.7%) were infected with TTVIs. The pattern and frequencies of TTVIs among the infected patients revealed HBV infection in 10 (41.7%), HIV-1 infection in five (20.8%), HCV infection in four (16.7%), HBV and HIV co-infection in three (12.5%), and HBV and HCV co-infection in two (8.3%). In comparison with haemophiliacs without TTVIs, haemophiliacs with TTVIs had a significantly lower mean age (4.9 vs. 7.8; p=0.007); a higher proportion of severe disease (62.5% vs. 26%; p=0.009), and a higher mean number of transfusions per patient (27.5 vs. 15.3; p=0.006). Conclusions: The prevalence of TTVIs among haemophiliacs in Nigeria is high, and the risk is correlated with disease severity and number of previous transfusions. There is need for the national transfusion service to be upgraded and for standard haemophilia care centres with an adequate supply of FVIII concentrates for optimal care to be set up. Haemophilia healthcare providers in Nigeria can minimise multiple transfusions by incorporating regular screening and treatment of haemorrhagic parasitic diseases, iron supplementation, and the use of pharmacological agents in the standard of care for haemophilia.

Open access
Safety of concomitant treatment with Non-Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants and SSRI/SNRI antidepressants

Abstract

Introduction: Warfarin has been considered as a “gold standard” in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events since 1954. Since the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants in the last few years (NOAC-Non-Vitamin K antagonist Oral Anticoagulants) prescriptions volume for apixaban, edoxaban, dabigatran and rivaroxaban have been gradually surpassing warfarin. The benefits include: anticoagulation from day one, fixed daily dosing, elimination for the need of international normalised ratio (INR) monitoring, fewer interactions with food and co-administered medicines with reduced risk of bleeding and better overall life quality.

Objectives: Assessing evidence for the safe use of Non-vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants (NOAC) with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) and Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRI).

Method: Review of literature published between 2014 and 2016 was made using the key words: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor, Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, bleeding, interaction, depression with time description from 2014 to 2018. Evidence within the literature was then compared with guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (UK), British National Formulary (UK), Clinical Excellence Commission (Australia), Thrombophilia and Anticoagulation Clinic (USA) and Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPC).

Results: 1. Serotonin plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis. Use of SSRI/SNRI compromises its platelet reuptake increasing risk of bleeding. 2. Increased tolerability and safety of NOAC over Warfarin, although caution is advised when NOAC is used with SSRI/SNRI with less evidence suggesting pharmacodynamic interactions. 3. It is not recommended to use NOAC with strong CYP and P-gp inhibitors.

Conclusions: With limited literature evidence, caution is advised when co-prescribed NOACs with SSRI/SNRI, especially with other cofactors and interacting medicines further increasing risk of bleeding.

Open access
Transforming Transition: enhancing practice in haemophilia

Abstract

Transition is the term used to describe the process of approaching and crossing the chronological boundary between paediatric and adult care services. Transfer of care describes the administrative arrangements associated with moving from a paediatric to an adult service across this boundary. Transforming Transition was a nurse-led initiative designed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience to enhance transition practice in the UK. The aims of the programme were to secure changes in working practices that enabled nurses to drive improved transition outcomes, enhance self-management by people with haemophilia and develop clinical leadership. From the outset of the programme it was clear that there were differences in practice and that sharing practice would be one route to addressing some of these variations. As a result of the knowledge and experience shared through the programme, resources described in this paper are available to all haemophilia centres. Sharing between people with haemophilia, their families and carers, and the haemophilia clinical team have resulted in the development of practical resources that enhance practice within the haemophilia centre. Sharing of practice between nurses and young people with haemophilia at the programme workshops provided a focus for development of local and regional action plans, a framework for reviewing progress, the introduction of transition clinics and improved transition documentation.

Open access
A transgender person with haemophilia

Abstract

Introduction: Transgender people face many obstacles to accessing healthcare but cultural changes are likely to increase provision of sex reassignment surgery in countries with sufficient resources. Haemophilia services traditionally focus on providing factor replacement therapy for males and should therefore understand how the care they provide can be adapted to meet the needs of transgender people. Haemophilia is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder, caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (haemophilia A) or factor IX (haemophilia B). The condition is passed on through carrier females, the majority of whom have a factor level high enough to allow for normal blood clotting. However, around 10% of carrier females are symptomatic and at risk of abnormal bleeding. Case presentation: This case report describes a person with mild haemophilia A who, on first presentation to the haemophilia service, stated he was a transgender person in transition to becoming a male. Haemophilia was diagnosed when heavy bleeding occurred following bilateral mastectomy approximately 25 years previously. He now requested phalloplasty. Management and outcome: Phalloplasty was performed at a hospital geographically separate from the haemophilia centre, requiring careful coordination between the two services. A haemophilia specialist nurse provided education and training about haemophilia and its management to the surgical nurses. Twenty-four-hour support was available from the nurse and a specialist doctor. Preparation and administration of clotting factor was the responsibility of the haemophilia nurse until the surgical team was confident in its use. Clotting factor replacement was managed using standard procedures, successfully maintaining factor VIII above a target level of 100% with a twice daily dose. Surgery went well, but wound healing was delayed, in part, due to persistent bleeding. Discussion: Close collaboration between the haemophilia and surgical teams provided effective prophylaxis of bleeding during a complex

procedure that presented new challenges. Both services now have better understanding of the needs of transgender people.

Open access
Uncommon psychopathological syndromes in psychiatry

Abstract

Introduction: The development of biological sciences, as well as cultural and civilizational changes have led to the emergence of practice within the medicine of science, called psychiatry. Already at the turn of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, Karl Jaspers - a German scholar - father of psychopathology - in the work “Allgemeine Psychopathologie” crystallized his intuitions in the field of psychopathology, which classifies and describes states that are deviations from the physiological mental state of a human being.

Material and method: his paper reviews available literature to approximate the symptoms of the most interesting psychopathological syndromes in psychiatry such as: Clerambault syndrome, Otheller syndrome, Cotard syndrome, Ekboma syndrome and Folie à deux.

Results: A multitude of psychopathological syndromes results from the wealth of survival of psychiatric patients. They represent the delusions of different contents that develop in a primitive way or as a consequence of other types of disorders. Psychopathological teams have been inspiring the poets and directors for centuries. The relationship between psychiatry and culture, film and literature undoubtedly testifies to its interdisciplinary nature.

Discussion: Despite the passage of time, the descriptions of these syndromes with a rich historical description, symptomatology and criteria have not lost their relevance and are still a clinical reality.

Open access
You think you know the patient inside-out. But do you know the outside-in?

Abstract

Haemophilia impacts on the person who has it as well as his close family and friends. The majority of healthcare provider focus is with the person with haemophilia and his carers during childhood, and then on the person himself as he becomes able to self-manage. There is a belief that the family and healthcare team support the patient equally. In this study, which was designed to understand the patient/ carer/healthcare provider relationship, we investigated support mechanisms from the patient’s perspective, using narrative stories from those we call ‘witnesses’. Carers, family and friends rarely feature in haemophilia research, yet can provide in-depth insight into the life of the person with haemophilia. Three key areas were identified which underlie and cause tension in the world of haemophilia. These are described as ‘identity and tackling the lion’, ‘the haemophilia team’ and ‘the unique perspective and influence of the ‘outside-in’. Support from the ‘outside-in’ as well as healthcare providers is important for people with haemophilia for both physical and psychological health. Working together we can better support individuals with haemophilia as well as other members of their extended families. As haemophilia care changes in a new era of therapeutic options; we need to re-evaluate the supportive role of family and carers to ensure that the patient and family voice is heard in decision-making at an individual and national level.

Open access
Young people’s experience of transition from paediatric to adult haemophilia care in the UK

Abstract

People with haemophilia and other bleeding disorders, such as von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD), are frequently diagnosed in childhood. There is, therefore, a recognised need to prepare children and young people with these conditions for transfer to long-term care in the adult sector. The Transforming Transition programme was designed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience to enhance transition practice in the UK. The aim of the programme was to secure change in working practices to enable nurses to drive improved transition outcomes, enhance self-management by people with haemophilia and develop clinical leadership. As part of the programme, we captured young people’s views of their transition experiences by means of a series of structured interviews conducted with young people identified through the patient association. Interviews revealed that transition tended to take place around the age of 16 but could be delayed in response to individual circumstances. The transition process did not always appear to be planned, with many participants reporting an abrupt or sudden change between paediatric and adult teams and/or centres. Those with severe haemophilia tended to be well educated and prepared by their paediatric teams to be confident in managing their condition from an early age. They would learn to self-infuse between the ages of 5-11, and reported feeling confident in tailoring their treatment around their daily routine. Experience of transition to adult services varied, with about half describing it as fairly well planned. For those with bleeding disorders such as vWD, there was rarely a transition process. These individuals and people with mild haemophilia described having less exposure to opportunities to learn self-management and appeared to experience issues which coincided with significant lifestyle changes, such as leaving home and attending university. This highlights the importance of ensuring that patients across the spectrum of bleeding disorders are adequately supported in the lead-up to and transfer to adult services. The interviews also reinforce the need to continue to address the specific needs of women with bleeding disorders as they transfer to adult services. The learning from this phase of the Transforming Transition programme was submitted to NICE as part of the consultation on its guideline.

Open access
Nurse-led telephone review service for mild inherited bleeding disorders improves attendance rates, frees hospital resources and is highly rated by patients

Abstract

Introduction and objective: In the UK, the National Service Specification for haemophilia stipulates that all patients with mild inherited bleeding disorders must be reviewed annually by their haemophilia centre. For those patients who rarely experience problems relating to their bleeding disorder, attending a yearly hospital-based appointment may be viewed as a low priority. This can result in missed appointments and disconnection from their haemophilia centre, leading to poor understanding of how to manage their condition in emergencies, or when surgical or other invasive procedures may be necessary. The inherited nature of these conditions also has implications for reproduction, and it is of vital importance that the risk of bleeding around labour, delivery and the neonatal period are fully understood and mitigated against. The introduction of a structured, nurse-led telephone clinics across the North London Adult Haemophilia Network (NLAHN) offered an alternative method for patients to be reviewed. This strategy was then evaluated to assess whether the needs of patients were being fulfilled. Materials and methods: Clinical nurse specialists (CNS) from the NLAHN devised a short service evaluation questionnaire with Likert scales and one open question. Patients across the NLAHN sites who had received a telephone review in 2016 were sent an anonymised questionnaire, with a stamped addressed envelope and a six-week return date. Results: 514 questionnaires were distributed, 174 were returned, and 18 were excluded as returned incomplete, giving a return rate of 28%. Overall, 89% (139/156) of patients rated the new service between excellent and very good; 89% (139/156) reported that they were very satisfied with the information received in the review; and 95% (149/156) were happy to continue to receive telephone reviews. Conclusion: Patients found the telephone reviews a viable alternative to traditional hospital-based appointments. The telephone clinics are more convenient for patients in terms of time and resources; they also helped those surveyed to re-engage with their haemophilia centre, ensuring continued education about their condition and the services offered. Overall attendance rates for the follow-up of patients with mild bleeding disorders have improved, with a reduction in traditional clinic appointments for this group. This has an ongoing positive impact on waiting lists and the financial burden of missed hospital appointments without impacting patient care.

Open access