Browse

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 106 items for :

  • Paediatric Cardiology x
Clear All
Open access

Joanna Szymkiewicz - Dangel, Grażyna Brzezińska - Rajszys, Bohdan Maruszewski and Agata Włoch

Open access

Kinga Bączyk-Rozwadowska

Abstract

Civil liability for medical malpractice may be attributed either to a doctor or a hospital when any of these persons’ acts or omissions cause injuries to a patient; it may be also the hospital’s liability for the damage caused by negligence of its staff (doctors and other personnel). The rules that govern this liability and the way of compensating the damage are different due to the grounds on which the doctor performs medical services and, in case of hospital’s liability, the relation between a doctor and a health care institution. A doctor who runs his private medical practice bears civil liability individually and is obliged to pay damages if any of his patient suffers injury in connection with the treatment. However, a doctor who acts as employee of a health care institution is protected by the provisions of the Labour Code and exempted from civil liability to a patient. On the other hand, a so-called independent contractor’s liability is joint and several with a hospital that has engaged him. However, case law seems to protect such doctors and treat them as hospital’s employees if certain premises are fulfilled (like de facto subordination of the doctor to the head of the ward).

Open access

Iwona Strzelecka, Maciej Słodki, Andrzej Zieliński, Iwona Maroszyńska and Maria Respondek-Liberska

Abstract

Introduction:

Prenatal diagnosis is an integral part of modern perinatal care. In the article results of questionnaires pertaining to the prenatal process of diagnosis are presented. Parents whose children were afflicted with congenital malformations of all types responded to enquiry

Materials and methods:

Between March 2014 and March 2015 150 of 355 infants were hospitalized in the Department of Pediatric Intensive Care and Congenital Malformations in Łódź, and 150 had congenital malformations.

Results:

101 parents of 150 children (67,3%) have given the feedback. Anomalies were such as: of the digestive system (37%), CHD (25%), OUN (14 %), genito-urinary (13%), skeletal system (9%) and respiratory system (2%). In 65 children of 101 the defects were detected prenatally. The obstetric US exam was the most frequently pointed out as performed (more than 1200). The biochemical markers and genetic tests in were performed in 34 pregnancies. The high percentage of ability to detect malformation was reported in the group of fetal echo examinations.

Conclusions:

1. Prenatal ultrasound exams were the least effective method of making appropriate prenatal diagnosis of congenital malformation.

2. Fetal echocardiography had a high level of sensitivity and specificity in detecting congenital malformations.

3. Prenatal cardiologists proved to be the most effective in detecting congenital malformations 89,3 % of detected abnormalities.

4. Biochemical exams had a positive result in only one case of Down Syndrome.

Open access

Lucia Manganaro

Abstract

Congenital heart defect (CHD) is one of the most common type of fetal malformations. Tissue-Doppler imaging, dynamic threedimensional (4D) echocardiography and fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are advanced modalities for the assessment of cardiac structure and function. MRI can study the cardiac morphology using T2-weighted half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo sequence (HASTE) and steady-state free precession (True FISP) sequences. Also a dynamic study can be performed, through the acquisition of cine-MR sequences with real-time steady-state free precession (SSFP) oriented according to the standard projections used in fetal echocardiographic scanning. If the challenges relating to motion and cardiac gating can be overcome, MRI has the potential to provide high-resolution imaging of the fetal heart.

Open access

Iwona Strzelecka, Joanna Płużańska, Jerzy Węgrzynowski, Tomasz Moszura, Maciej Słodki and Maria Respondek-Liberska

Abstract

Most heart defects form between 4 and 6 weeks after fertilization. The detection rate is still growing. Despite significant progress in prenatal diagnosis some cases still go undetected. We present two cases of similar defects: prenatally detected and undetected, both presenting with a normal four chamber view in mid-pregnancy. We compared the follow-up of both neonates along with sustained health and economic consequences. The dynamics of the development of heart defects during prenatal life suggests the legitimacy to perform additional, late echocardiography exams (35-38 weeks of gestation)

Open access

Jakub Malinowski, Maciej Słodki, Krzysztof Szaflik and Wanda Mikołajczyk-Wieczorek

Abstract

We present a case of a female fetus with large posterior fossa cyst. After detailed diagnosis in referral center revealing normal heart anatomy and no functional abnormalities in cardiovascular system, a trial decompression of the fluid reservoir was suggested to the parents and successfully performed at the 30th week of pregnancy. Neurosurgical treatment was continued in the neonatal period. At the age of 7 months, the child presented normal physical development, and the cranial image of the CNS showed good recovery of the brain.

Open access

Agnieszka Nawara-Baran and Beata Radzymińska-Chruściel

Abstract

The aim of this study was an analysis of cardiac assessment in the first trimester, their outcomes, and comparison with literature data. Five cases were analysed from the year 2014. The exams were performed between 11-13 + 6 weeks. The analysis confirmed that the detection of CHD in 1 st trimester was possible and was verified by an early fetal echocardiogram. The most common symptoms of abnormal heart images in the early screening assessment were: axis, heart size and color Doppler assessment of the chambers and V sign. The outcome of pregnancies with early detection of fetal heart defects was poor. There was only one surviver

Open access

Maciej Słodki and Maria Respondek-Liberska

Abstract

Attempts to adapt the classifications of pediatric congenital heart defects (CHD) to prenatal cardiology have been lasting for many years. The paediatric cardiology CHD classifications are mainly based on anatomic details and/or pulmonary blood flow and are not always useful in fetal medicine. Because of these reasons and also many more, adaptation attempts of congenital heart defects of children, from pediatric to prenatal cardiology have not brought desired effects.Clinical course in utero and at delivery can now be predicted, and as a consequence, fetal medicine specialists are being asked to consider the fetus as a patient and the transition to postnatal life is an important part of care. The new prenatal classifications of CHD shows new particular group of CHD, requiring emergent procedure after birth. Thanks to organizing special delivery room with special team of specialist we can much more improve the outcome, especially in severest CHD.

Open access

Katarzyna Piątek, Katarzyna Zych-Krekora, Joanna Płużańska, Ewa Gulczyńska and Maria Respondek-Liberska

Abstract

Complains about prenatal diagnoses usually touch late diagnosis, missed diagnosis or uncomplete diagnosis. Prenatal diagnose provides usually important information for parents, obstetrician and neonatologist. Successful perinatal care is based on a good cooperation of the perinatal team. This time we present a peculiar situation when improper reading of prenatal diagnosis had caused a lot of troubles for the patient, parents and hospital staff.

Open access

Maria Respondek-Liberska, Joanna Płużańska, Katarzyna Zych-Krekora, Ewa Czichos, Maciej Słodki and Jadwiga Moll

Abstract

From 2012-2014 we selected fetuses who had an isolated congenital heart defect and restriction of the foramen ovale defined as its diameter of 4 mm or less, shunt across foramen ovale, V max > 70 cm/sec along with a typical harsh sound during fetal ausculation during echocardiography and reversal flow in pulmonary veins, no extracardiac anomalies, singleton pregnancies and delivery > 37 weeks of gestation. It was retrospective analysis of 16 cases: There were 10 non-survivors and 6 survivors The only significant difference between survivors and non-survivors pertained to the fraction of newborns operated on up to 11th day, which was significantly higher among the survivors (5/6 vs. 2/8, p=0.031).

Conclusions:

1) In the event of prenatal restriction of the foramen ovale early surgery by day 10 had a statistically better outcome in terms of survival compared to cases that underwent surgery at a later period at our Institute.

2) Prenatal restriction of the foramen ovale was more often related to male gender and in 75% of cases in our series had complicated follow-up: neonatal death or prolonged hospital stay.3) Information from prenatal echocardiography regarding restriction of the foramen ovale should be taken into consideration as valuable information suggesting priority for early cardiac surgery.