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Abstract

The article aims at presenting the possibilities of using games, most of all the board ones, in civic education of children, the youth and adults. The article will demonstrate activities of Pomorskie Stowarzyszenie Aktywni Lokalnie (Pomeranian Society Locally Active-PSAL), which has taken advantage of games in its activities popularizing public participation as well as in ecological education.

Abstract

This article profiles a MOOC on International Franchise Law offered by UNSW Sydney in 2016. The IFL MOOC is an example of an open access legal education course that was successfully integrated in real time into an on-campus curriculum for students majoring in business law. Opportunities, and future challenges that emerged for legal education are addressed.

Abstract

With the current issue of student retention and attrition as a major aspect of online education, this interpretivist qualitative case study sought to determine whether online facilitators and online student-to-student relationships affect online graduate students’ ability to complete their modules and achieve student learning objectives and outcomes (LOO). This study encompassed CoI (Community of Inquiry) and surveyed 54 participants who indicated that the three interdependent presences that form part of CoI (cognitive, social, and teaching) were instrumental in helping them to complete their modules and to achieve student learning objectives and outcomes (LOO). Students’ feedback on online facilitators exemplified their cognitive presence in the form of statements linked to triggering events and exploring of ideas. However, there were few statements connected to integration and none linked to resolution. Overall, most of the data collected connected to subsets of teaching and social presences rather than cognitive presence. Additionally, students’ feedback on their peers suggests that social presence that fosters group cohesion is the most critical factor to assist in completion of the modules and achieving student LOO. Open communication was also indicated and, to a lesser degree, personal/affective subsets of social presence were evident. The findings of this study suggest that more research is needed on the components of the three presences and their relationship to students’ ability to complete the module and achieve student LOO.

Abstrakt

Ojcostwo jest tematem tak ważnym i poważnym, bo faktycznie od ojcostwa, od tego, jakich mamy mężczyzn, mężów i ojców, ogromnie wiele zależy. Jeżeli miejsce, które w wychowaniu dzieci zarezerwowane jest dla ojca pozostaje puste, to powstanie luka, której nie da się odrobić ani zapełnić.

Obecnie brak ojca w rodzinie stał się nie tylko zjawiskiem zauważalnym, ale wręcz powszechnym. Mamy do czynienia z kryzysem męskości. Jest to poważny problemem, który stale przybiera na sile, i który z pewnością w najbliższym czasie nie zniknie.

Zgodnie z coraz powszechniej przyjmowanym nowym paradygmatem męskości, oczekuje się od mężczyzn pełnego zaangażowania w życie rodzinne i równego podziału obowiązków. Krytycznie ocenia się rolę ojca jako nieobecnego w procesie wychowania dzieci. Eksponuje się korzyści płynące z nowych doświadczeń, jakie przynosi angażowanie się mężczyzn w życie rodzinne i opiekę nad dzieckiem.

Trudno jest odpowiedzieć na pytanie „Kim ma być dziś mężczyzna”? Kryzys męskości pociąga za sobą także kryzys ojcostwa. Można powiedzieć, że jego wizerunek stał się kruchy. Często nawet zadajemy sobie pytanie: czy obraz ojca nie rozpadł się definitywnie na kawałki? W dzisiejszych czasach pytania te nie są bynajmniej oczywiste. Warto abyśmy sobie na nie odpowiadali, uświadamiali kryzys współczesnego rodzicielstwa i starali się szukać szans na jego odbudowanie.

Abstract

In this article, I would like to attempt to reinterpret political prudence – a key skill for political action according to classical philosophy (Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas) – as a useful and even necessary skill for educators and teachers. This reinterpretation is made possible primarily by the fact that a significant part of the political works of classical authors is concerned with the upbringing and education of children and adolescents.

Abstract

The purpose of the article is to show the personalistic dimension of education as consciously and intentionally organized social activities, aimed at causing changes in human personality, shaping the right attitudes, beliefs and assimilation recognized by specific social environments – family, school, group – values, norms, behavior patterns and goals life, which is a dynamic and complex process that usually occurs in personal interaction.

In particular, I would like to strongly emphasize the fact that in philosophy, education is included in metaphysical, anthropological, ethical and axiological aspects. The beginnings of philosophical reflection on upbringing date back to the Greek παιδεία – the ideal of formation for mature humanity through harmonious physical, mental and moral development towards good and beauty. In the circle of European culture, this ideal has become synonymous with universal principles of education.

The contemporary multiplicity of the concept of upbringing forces researchers to holistically capture the essence of up-bringing, which can be provided by realistic philosophy and the personalistic concept of man embedded in it. In this perspective, the basics of upbringing and self-education are rooted in the ontical structure of the human being, its potentiality and contingency. For this reason, the European pedagogical tradition is not exhausted either in collectivism or in individualism. The educational tradition of Europe is παιδεία and a stream of philosophical realism complemented by Christian culture. This tradition is guided by the principle of personalism in upbringing, and the truly personalistic upbringing concerns the real man, it is an update of the living abilities inscribed in human nature. This applies by all means to tutoring.

Abstract

This article aims at analyzing the presentations of poverty in global education with a focus on Polish publications. The study demonstrates poverty definitions, categorizations and poverty in the global context – measuring methods and the causes and consequences that sustain global poverty cycles. To achieve the purpose of this article I refer to the history of global education and the comparison of two approaches, soft and critical. These elements outline specific ways of understanding poverty in global education discourse. Along with the historical, political and social context, two visions of poverty are clarified: the one focusing on helplessness of the poor and compassion and the one focusing on injustices of global systems and solidarity. The theoretical content is confronted with the analysis of three Polish global education publications for teachers and educators. The outcome of this article is a vision of poverty that seems to be majorly based on the principles of critical global education.

Abstract

Society of Archaeology Students (SAS), in Polish: Koło Naukowe Studentów Archeologii (KNSA), is one of the oldest student societies working within the Institute of Archaeology of Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. In recent years SAS began to work in cooperation with other archaeological, historical and educational organisations, as well as with museums and open-air archaeological reservations. Most of our work is focused around building and maintaining the archaeological consciousness in contemporary society – not only through participating in various mass events but also through preparing workshops for people from local communities, as well as through adding archaeological impressions to various museum events and mass outdoor reenactment festivals. Within the current outlook on archaeological methodology, those actions are linked to so-called public archaeology – the concept that is still somewhat new in many areas of archaeological activities in Poland.

The following article concerns strategies that are present in the SAS’ archaeological popularisation initiatives, as well as our reflections and inquiries on the topic of archaeological education in contemporary reality, with its numerous homogenised, standardised or idealised concepts of the past, often mirrored in many historical festivals’ conventions. Through our observations based upon various experiences, we would like to try to determine how the archaeological education and popularisation could be more widely recognised not only as a valuable but rather as an inseparable part of being an archaeolo-gist – university scholar or a field-working one.

Abstract

The article aims at presenting the history of tutoring and the role of a tutor in one of the most significant educational concepts in the world starting with the ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China or the countries of Europe-Greece, Rome, England, Ireland, Kingdom of the Franks, the Roman Empire, France, Poland, Italy, ending with the immense social transformations sparked by the French Revolution. Throughout the centuries the role of tutors was of great significance since by staying in homes of their pupils not only did they educate but by the direct relation between a master and an apprentice, based on friendship and mutual trust, which initiated honest discussion, they influenced to a great extent the shaping of their pupils` personalities…

Abstract

While technology-assisted learning has become commonplace in education, its applications are rarely examined along geopolitical and cultural perspectives that reveal certain shared and vastly distinct localized practices in evolving pedagogy and cultural dynamics. For developing countries such as Uzbekistan, collaborating virtually with a university in the U.S. may represent both a technological and socio-cultural challenge. Conducting a virtual international project, nonetheless, offers a unique chance to experience another culture in real time through its people, exposing reductionist perceptions of other cultures and humanizing that other through community-generated dialogue. Virtual intercultural exchanges advance intercultural communicative competency and constitute an effective format for high-impact learning practices that advance students’ understanding and appreciation of diversity, equity and inclusion in traditional and online classrooms. This surveys student evaluations of a pilot Virtual International Exchange (VIE) completed between U.S. and Uzbek students in 2018, and underpins a theoretical framework for the benefits of concurring cognitive dissonance for the benefit of open, equitable and inclusive pedagogical models.