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Abstract

This article examines the instructional practices used to teach the computer science (CS) standard of computer devices and systems to undergraduate preservice teachers (PSTs). With computer science education (CSE) gaining an international focus, there is a need to explore a variety of instructional practices used to teach these topics. This descriptive, exploratory case study presents an examination of the instructional practices used in a CSE licensure course. In this study, the instructor utilised two commercially available computer kits to provide hands-on, learner-centred learning experiences for PSTs. PSTs perceived these kits to be valuable for learning about computing devices and systems topics and for teaching these topics in their future classrooms. Additionally, results showed that PSTs considered the usability, grade level and ability of the kits to build interest in CS when reflecting on their future use. Limitations to the instructional practices included a lack of transfer to subject areas outside of CS and a lack of focus on the integration between hardware and software.

Abstract

The intersection between academia and social media is gradually overlapping. The ability to vent personal and professional discord online, either through blogs or social media, has had both positive and negative consequences on academic communication, with the public and/or in the public domain. ResearchGate (RG) is one of the most popular academic social media sites that allows commenting, either in response to published papers or to questions that are posed on that platform. This paper explores an important aspect of a high-profile, topical and controversial 2017 paper (Derek Pyne; Journal of Scholarly Publishing; DOI: 10.3138/jsp.48.3.137) that had based itself on a flawed blacklist created by Jeffrey Beall. In that paper, unfounded claims were made regarding financial rewards as remuneration schemes at a “small business school” in Canada related to publishing papers in “predatory” journals, i.e., in open access journals that were blacklisted by Beall. Based on those claims, Pyne used RG as a platform to target academics at his research institute. Pyne could have, but did not, use the scholarly platform to engage with his colleagues in an academic debate about his controversial findings, causing personal disrepute on three occasions. Consequently, RG was contacted with a claim of defamation on each occasion. Within hours of each claim, Pyne’s comments were deleted. In early May, RG also erased his social media account. The issue of actual or potential insults in the public domain, such as on blogs, is rarely discussed, much less related to academic social media sites like RG. This case study, and the issues discussed herein related to social media more broadly, will be useful for academics to better navigate increasingly challenging publishing waters.

Abstract

Portfolios are often used in higher education for learning, promotion, assessment and appraisal. Thanks to technical developments in recent years, portfolios are increasingly digital rather than physical. E-portfolios provide a comprehensive way to document personal progress, to reflect on work activities, to support learning and to serve as a tool for feedback and evaluation. However, there has been very little research conducted on the use of e-portfolios for learning purposes in higher education. This paper focuses on the use of e-portfolios in teacher education. Six students in a master programme work with e-portfolios in the course of their practical vocational training. In a mixed-methods design, the students were interviewed about their experiences and the process of writing e-portfolios. In addition, a document analysis of the e-portfolio entries has been conducted in terms of content and structure. The findings of this study provide indications on how e-portfolios can be used effectively in teacher training and which promoting and inhibiting conditions students encounter.

Abstract

Investigating disengagement is a continuing concern within computer-based learning environments. Drawing upon several strands of research into preservice teacher learning with network-based tutors, this paper outlines an object orientation to conceptualize a type of disengaged behaviour referred to as carelessness. We further differentiate this construct in terms of carelessness towards one’s own learning as opposed to other’s learning. In support of our claims, we review research into carelessness in the context of nBrowser, an intelligent web browser designed to support preservice teachers learn about the pedagogical affordances of novel technologies while designing lesson plans. The key aspects of this research can be listed as follows: (1) a knowledge engineering approach to implement a set of production rules within the learning environment to detect instances of carelessness and intervene; (2) a data-driven approach to infer learner behaviours in their absence due to carelessness; and (3) a model-driven approach to improve the functioning of the learning environment despite instances of carelessness. We discuss the limitations of these different approaches and draw implications for future research into preservice teacher disengagement with computer-based learning environments.

Abstract

This work analyses the use of artificial intelligence in education from an interdisciplinary point of view. New studies demonstrated that an AI can “deviate” and become potentially malicious, due to programmers’ biases, corrupted feeds or purposeful actions. Knowing the pervasive use of artificial intelligence systems, including in the educational environment, it seemed necessary to investigate when and how an AI in education could deviate. We started with an investigation of AI and the risks it poses, wondering if they could be applied also to educative AI. We then reviewed the increasing literature that deals with the use of technology in the classroom, and the criticism about it, referring to specific use cases. Finally, as a result, the authors formulate questions and suggestions for further research, to bridge conceptual gaps underlined by lack of research.

Abstract

Although LinkedIn is the world’s largest professional networking site, the research concerning self-presentation on the platform is limited and fragmented. The main goal of the study was to explore the self-presentation of Polish football managers on LinkedIn in four dimensions: completeness and attractiveness of the profile, network-embeddedness, and activity. Using quantitative content analysis of managers’ profiles (N=319), the research shows that the managers exploit the potential of LinkedIn to build their personal professional brand only in a very limited and mostly static way. In addition, the self-presentation in LinkedIn is the best among managers working in Polish Football Association, improves with the length of professional experience, and shows only slight differences between women and men.