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Alicia Mirta Ciancio

Abstract

This paper is centered on the subject’s private dialogue with his/her own body during midlife – in this case «body» means an open history coming from the wish of a child that parental figures projected, something that remains open to changes till the last minute of life. This situation revalidatesego’s discourse with him/her during this period of the life cycle, highlighted with the imprint of one’s own finitude. The author also presents a clinical case through which the understanding of the subject’s major intimacy with himself/herself is made possible – something that demands a never-ending re-adoption of changes encompassed by the passing of time. This re-adoption is the core of midlife – a period of the life cycle where physical changes usually imply different kind of losses. Through this clinical case it is also clear that the specific link that exists between the first representations that gave birth to the I-body dialogue and those closely related and specific to midlife.

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James C. Kaufman

Abstract

Despite an ongoing surge of interest in creativity (both in academia and the public eye), it is essential that researchers focus on why creativity matters. Studies that empathize variables that help increase creativity are absolutely valuable, but I argue that need more work on how creativity can lead to positive outcomes. Much of the existing literature examines how creativity can improve school or work performance – which it does. Yet when these studies are compared with similar ones on conscientiousness, it is hard to argue that increasing creativity is the best way to succeed in school or work (at least using traditional metrics). I argue that as a field, we need to expand our ideas about how creativity can be beneficial. I end with an open call for suggestions.

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Vlad Petre Glăveanu

Abstract

In this reply to Kaufman’s paper “Creativity’s Need for Relevance in Research and Real Life” I argue, from a sociocultural and pragmatist standpoint, that creativity matters because it captures the agentic, flexible, open and emergent side of human existence while, at the same time, helping us build, maintain, and transform the societies we live in.

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Marie Forgeard

Abstract

Mental health is one of the potential outcomes of creative behavior deserving of further research, as much of previous anecdotal and scientific evidence has offered conflicting findings on this topic. Integrating the expertise and methods used by scholars in different disciplines (e.g., art therapy, clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, personality psychology) may help clarify the conditions under which creative behavior is or is not helpful for specific aspects of mental health, and generate new insights into the mechanisms that might explain such benefits.

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Ahmed M. Abdulla and Bonnie Cramond

Abstract

This paper proposes a model, which hopefully will allow researchers in the psychology of creativity to confirm that the different levels and different labels for problem finding can be unified under one construct - problem finding (PF). Although no clear distinctions are made among the levels and terms used in the PF literature, the current efforts suggest that there are important differences that can be explained by (a) how well- or ill-defined a problem is, and (b) the degree to which ideation and evaluation are required. Based on these two criteria, a rubric is presented that allows distinctions to be made among five the PF processes: (a) problem discovery, (b) problem formulation, (c) problem construction, (d) problem identification, and (e) problem definition. The authors examined the literature on PF in English from 1960 to 2015 using the following databases: (a) Academic Search Premier, (b) PsycARTICLES, (c) PsycINFO, (d) Dissertation Abstract, (e) Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), (f) Psychology & Behavioral Science Collection, and (g) the Google Scholar. This search resulted in 199 articles in which at least 13 different terms were used to describe the process of finding a problem. Only a few articles endeavored to distinguish among the terms used in the literature. This paper concludes by suggesting that one term (i.e., problem finding) is to be used to avoid confusion. If this is not possible, for whatever reason, the term used instead should be defined and the reasons for the choice of terms clearly stated.

Open access

Dean Keith Simonton

Abstract

The author responds to Kaufman’s (2018) target essay from a unique perspective – research on creative genius. Although the author began studying little-c creativity, he switched to Big-C creativity when he did his doctoral dissertation, and continued that work for the rest of his career. One implication of such research is that the relevance of creative genius cannot be questioned, even if its benefits are sometimes ambiguous (however obviously consequential). Another implication is that creative geniuses do not require training in creativity, whatever usefulness such instruction may possess for everyday creativity.

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Monika Żak-Skalimowska

Abstract

The objective of my project entitled “Creating my own text-book - I know what I want to learn and how” was to develop children’s awareness of a broadly defined ability to learn, through the creation of their own textbooks, which they would like to use at school. The main aim of the research described below was to gain an understanding of what children them-selves would consider to be an ideal textbook from which to learn, what they would really like to learn about, and what are their interests and needs in terms of learning at school. Twenty-seven pupils from the III-rd grade of primary school participated in the project. The educational project lasted five months. A basic assumption of the research was that pupils have their own personal knowledge with regard to the content of what they would like to be taught at school. Conclusions from the research were formulated on the basis of interviews carried out with the children and an analysis of the textbooks which they created. The results show that the pupils who participated in the educational project are able to describe what their ideal school textbook should be like. The objective of the present paper is to present the conclusions drawn from the educational project from the perspective of developing meta-learning skills in young, school-aged children.

Open access

Antonino Ferro

Abstract

This article presents a summary of the theses advanced in Bion’s Transformations and describes their application by the analyst in the session. It then discusses the development of post-Bionian transformations in dreaming and play. Clinical material illustrates how these transformations may become effective therapeutic tools.

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Mauro Manica

Abstract

In this work the author considers how the Freudian psychoanalytic paradigm has been transformed by Bion’s theory and how the transference-countertransference dynamics must be transferred into an oneiric way of thinking. Here, a “quid” of lie becomes necessary to compare the traumatic experience of the patient with the analyst’s capacity to suffer his own personal and professional critical steps. If the analyst is to contact the O of the patient, it is necessary for him to contact his own O – during his training and in his personal narrative. Truth needs a “bit” of lie to be born, and the lie of the dream is one of the possibilities for intercepting the truth that the patient brings in analysis or, at least, the only truth that the patient can live. This truth, however, needs a share of lie (of poetry, of dream) in order to generate new emotions and new life.

Open access

Fulvio Mazzacane

Abstract

The question that has prompted this article could be formulated as follows: what are the vicissitudes of the analyst’s subjectivity in the bi-personal models and, more specifically, in the Bion field model? Using a clinical vignette, the author shows his own “toy box” mainly the way he uses reverie and the interplay between plot and characters in the session.