Browse

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 97 items for :

  • Sociological Theory x
Clear All
Open access

Matteo Antonini

Abstract

The analysis of the Swiss labor market poses a methodological challenge. On the one hand, Switzerland is too diversified to be analyzed as a single socio-economic space. On the other hand, a high level of territorial fragmentation makes the use of administrative divisions methodologically weak. In this paper, we classify Swiss cantons into three types of labor markets: attractive, multicenter, and marginal. Our typology is based on a wide range of economic and labor market parameters, and can be a ready-to-use tool for further researches.

Open access

Leah R. Kimber, Claudine Burton-Jeangros, Loïc Riom and Cornelia Hummel

Abstract

The literature frequently argues that the feeling of insecurity might be greater among the elderly than in other population groups. Based on results of a qualitative study which consisted of 51 interviews with people aged between 70 and 92 years old, this paper proposes to approach the feeling of insecurity from the actors’ perspective. This allows us to take into account the perception of the elderly in order to dispose of the age-related vision that tends to erase the effects of fragility due to aging.

Open access

Felix Bühlmann and Marion Beetschen

Open access

Désiré Manirakiza

Abstract

Without questioning the binomial Civil Society-Democracy, this study shows that with regard to the disturbed past of Burundi, the Civil Society cannot be the place to learn about values of democracy. The reflection highlights an institution whose agents, under the socio-financial and politico-ideological pressure, are not beyond the realm in which political power and other socioeconomic bonuses are gained.

Open access

Julie Falcon and Dominique Joye

Abstract

We study whether educational homogamy has increased following the rise of women’s educational attainment and of egalitarian couples in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. From the analysis of data from the European Union and Swiss Labour Force Surveys over a 15-year period (1999–2013), we observe that educational homogamy did not increase across cohorts, although we find substantial differences in the degree of homogamy according to couple arrangements.

Open access

Dorian Kessler

Abstract

This study examines the association between educational attainment and separation risks in marital or non-marital first partnerships to query the extent to which educational expansion has affected trends in partnership stability. Because the educational gradient in separation changed from being positive for women (and, to a lesser extent, for men) to being statistically non-significant at the same time as educational expansion took place, the latter can only serve as a minor explanation of the exceptional rise in breakup rates in Switzerland.

Open access

Dirk Konietzka and Michaela Kreyenfeld

Abstract

This paper examines the association of education and family forms based on data of the German microcensus 1996–2012. The investigation shows that highly educated women in western Germany had a higher probability of living in a nonmarital instead of a marital union. With an increase in the share of nonmarital births, the association has reversed. Likewise, the highly educated couples were initially the vanguards of living in nonmarital unions with children, but they are nowadays the least likely to do so. Patterns differ between eastern and western Germany, though.

Open access

Gina Potarca and Laura Bernardi

Abstract

According to status-caste exchange theory, intermarriages involve transactions in which higher educated immigrants trade status for the ethnic advantage of the less-educated native partners. Looking at 2 836 currently married Swiss immigrants, we find that the highly skilled “exchange” their status only when pairing with a medium-educated native. Results also show that younger cohorts of immigrants are more likely to choose hypogamy when marrying a same-origin immigrant than when partnering a native.

Open access

Ramsey Wise and Christoph Zangger

Abstract

How is educational expansion associated with increased educational homogamy and income inequality? Using SOEP and SHP panel data, we randomly match couples and compare the resulting income distribution to the observed one. Educational homogamy thereby has had only a marginal impact on earnings-based income inequality between couples, which is largely due to the endogenous decision-making of couples concerning working time.

Open access

Rolf Becker, Ben Jann and Eric Widmer