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Wioleta Danilewicz

Abstract

For almost seven decades, “Studia Pedagogiczne” has witnessed the development and transformations of Polish pedagogy. The first issue was published in 1954. The period between 1954 and 2018 has been a time of global change, and also change in Poland, affecting all spheres of life, be it political, economic, social or cultural. The journal accompanied those transformations and documented many of them, and so it also serves as evidence of these changes. The purpose of this presented text is not to analyse the content of the journal. Instead, it is to approach the topics discussed in it, the areas tackled by the authors and the changes in the perception of the educa­tional reality in Poland from the perspective of passing time and with consideration of their variety.

Open access

Zoran Avramović

Abstract

Spirit and body of the man living in the world of modern technology are discussed in the paper. The entire life of modern man is under the pressure of rapid and far‐reaching changes in economy, organisation, education, self‐image. The relations between the spirit and the body on the one side and illness and health, money, media, narcissism, morality and national identity on the other side are studied in the article. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between the world of modern science and technology and the quality of life focusing on the mind and body. The fact emphazised in the conclusion is that the nature of Western ‐ European civilization has been changing with predominant turning to the SELF, to the absolute interest of an invidual in terms of materialism. The result of this civilizational turn is jeopardizing the spirit and the body of modern man.

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Ewa Bochno

Abstract

The paper attempts to indicate the potential of using the category of common good for the interpretation of everyday school reality. This has facilitated an initial over­view of the heterogeneous, often contradictory nature of school relationship as well as relationships between school and broadly understood environment, and has made it possible to reflect on school culture, i.e. its internal and external precondi­tions for functioning.

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Anna Cox and Victoria Clydesdale

Abstract

This small scale research project undertaken in Australia investigates how an art-based approach can re-engage disenfranchised young people into education. The project was undertaken as part of Postgraduate Certificate in Education programme by the main researcher in Australia, at an educational setting for disenfranchised young people. The collection and analysis of qualitative data demonstrates how art stimulates students’ interest and provides support in self-expression and com­munication. Methodological strategies involved visual art activities that promote self-confidence and self-esteem, which enhance well-being and supportive teach­ing relationships. Using self-reflexivity through visual creativity was found to help participants in developing more positive self-image and enhanced their self-confi­dence as learners.

Open access

Beata Karpińska-Musiał

Abstract

Academic institutions and their professional communities live presently in the times of constant change. Beyond numerous, official amendments within state regulations, also quality and pace of educational change undergo transformations. We observe the change of artefacts and contexts of socio-cultural demands which call for the necessity to reformulate good practices and competencies required in education. The paper is planned to highlight several aspects of change, considered by the author as sensitive to the possibility to personalize academic education: institutional, professional, scientific and simply humane. The intention is to provide a critical look upon academic tutoring and its potentials from the perspective of an academic tutor and tutor’s trainer, as well as a researcher on education. The net of arguments, following the title of this paper, shall be outstretched between research-based, policy-based and the very prac­tice-based nodal points, with my full awareness of the limitations that my insight carries due to the qualitative rather than quantitative type of the presented research. Nevertheless, the paper should bring down the picture of a polyphony of powers that make tutoring a very special, demanding, but top quality form of academic education, which should be supported, recommended and popularized among teachers in order for them to reach their academic excellence.

Open access

Marek Madro

Abstract

Introduction: Nowadays we are looking for help and answers to our questions more and more often on the Internet. People use social networks to search for communities or groups whose members experience similar difficulties. These are often online groups that focus on psychological problems, domestic violence, etc. Members receive instant feedback and at the same time, due to the online disinhibition effect, they do not feel the fear, shame or worries they would feel in personal contact (Griffiths, 2005). The content of such self-help groups is not always helpful, but may rather induce pathological behaviour. However, the group administrator can influence the atmosphere in the group and its content itself (Niwa & Mandrusiak, 2012).

Purpose: The purpose of this research was to find a space to perform professional psychological interventions inside online self-help groups on social networks. The concept of a field worker was used in this research. The field worker offers helping services to clients in an environment natural to them and where the worker can provide the client with emergency help during the crisis and prevent other clients from offering risk advices (Ambrózová, Vitálošová, & Labáth, 2006).

Methods: We have conducted qualitative research using the method of content-frequency analysis. The sample for this study consisted of 10 closed online self-help groups focusing on topics such as depression, anxiety disorder, domestic violence, self-injurious and suicidal thoughts and tendencies, etc. For the purpose of this research we created an online group moderated by professionals, focusing on similar topics of mental disorders.

Conclusions: The research results indicated that group members exchanged useful information (35.43%), described their current difficulties they were experiencing (32.33%), shared their own experiences (10.53%), and also published information on what had helped them manage the difficult feelings and situations they had been experiencing (6.39%). However, we also identified risky statements and threatening recommendations in posts and comments. Based on the results, we outlined the possibilities of online field worker interventions and described techniques of interventions that the professional can use for the benefit of group members.

Open access

Nenad Živanović and Zoran Milošević

Abstract

Physical culture with the man in its centre has always been an integral part of social events and troubles in various times and ages. Regardless the need to adjust its theory and practice to the given requirements and social circumstances of the time it has always been stretched between rationalism and theanthropos‐centrism. Rationalism and its right wing the Enlightenment had formed deep furrows in the area of physical culture, (too) since the age of Pythagoras, Epicurus, Plato and later Origen and the Neoplatonists and Descartes' ''I think, therefore I am''. The great Njegoš made a clear judgement of the general effects of Rationalism in his work The Ray of the Microcosm: ''You, Pythagoras and you, Epicurus, ... You have degraded a being a man.'' Indeed, only a glimpse at today's events and the development of sport and physical exercise is enough to prove his words to be true. On the other hand, thenathropos‐centrism with its theory and practice bring back hope that not all is lost, when everything is lost (R.P. Nogo). Theanthroposcentrism or, God‐man centrism as it can be called, approaches man with Love and belief that physical exercises is divine food for the human being. And that the food is given to him so that he can master the good as gifted from the Creator, to stand firm, get strong and divinized. Therefore, we can say that Rationalism and Thanthropos‐centrism are two views of and two approaches to man (even) in modern times. Behind the first one there is pridewhereas behind the second one there isLove. It is up to man himself to choose his way.

Open access

Đorđe Stefanović, Violeta Šiljak, Slađana Mijatović and Vladan Vukašinović

Abstract

The scientific contribution of this paper consists of an innovative approach to the issues of Orthodox faith and sport, which opens up a new creative area for theology itself, where sport also gets new opportunities. Given the known "affair" in almost all sports branches, which illustrate the state of "alarming helplessness", the contribution of faith in solving it is indisputable, especially in the way advocated in this research work. The primary goal is to extract from the plethora of theological literature those contents that can encourage the creative responsibility of all positive factors of sports events, from the athletes themselves, through their managers and club officials to the fans. Recognizing these problems and referring to theological sources as "clear content", without the bias of the members, with critical awareness, qualifies work to search and find adequate answers to the asked questions. The mere fact that a new research field has been opened, without the intention to make the last word on this, points to the scientific contribution of this paper.

Open access

Ljubiša Despotović

Abstract

The paper analyzes spiritual stumbling of modern man which in addition to other general aspects of life has also led to sport degradation to only one dimesion ‐ the dimension of the result covering particular material interests of having power and being popular to which all other sport components including playing as the most honourable ingredient, which in terms of anthropology defines man as a being whose essential characteristic is playing, are inferior. Spiritual stumbling of modern man is a result of ratiocentrism (that is, his abandoning the concept of theocentrism) with dispair and loss of morality turning the complex body‐spirit bond into an instrument and the sport competition itself into an alienating form of achieving results at all costs. As a result, athletes themselves as main participants in competitions (either against other competitors or against themselves) have become an instrument‐tool for gaining profit. Spiritual stumbling have generated moral crisis and left sports and their participants without any human dimension of existence degrading them to a single physical dimension and its merciless and brutal exploitation.