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Objective Status, Subjective Status and Prosociality of Swiss Apprentices

Abstract

In previous research, both positive and negative relationships between social status and prosociality have been reported. We argue that the nature of the observed status can explain these divergent findings. In an experimental study with technical and commercial apprentices, we show that objective status can have a positive effect on prosocial behaviour and that subjective status can have a negative effect when controlling for objective status.

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Un/Doing Ethnicity in Intervening Swiss Street-Level Bureaucracy. A Police Service and a Child Welfare Service – an Ethnographic Perspective

Abstract

The article presents the empirical findings of a multi-site ethnography in two organizations in Swiss street-level bureaucracy. We examined both a municipal child welfare office and the police force of a medium-sized city. The focus was on the question as to whether and how ethnic differentiation takes place in such public agencies and what role it plays at work. The findings suggest that un/doing ethnicity follows an instrumental logic and that it is executed in manifold and ambivalent ways.

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”Whatever Does Not Kill Me Makes Me Stronger”: A Sociological Analysis of Uses of the Concept of Resilience. The Case of Boris Cyrulnik’s Self-Help Books Readers

Abstract

This article offers a social science analysis of the resilience concept’s success and common sense uses. Based on a sample of letters from the readers of the French author Boris Cyrulnik’s self-help best-sellers, the article first depicts the characteristics of the attitude of the letters’ authors towards Cyrulnik and what they expect from him. Second, it proposes to understand resilience as a language game used to communicate about suffering and then analyses why certain readers feel resilient while others don’t. It concludes that this way of reacting to adversity (i. e., tapping one’s inner resources, never giving up) is particularly desirable in a context where autonomy has become more prestigious.

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Being “Other” in Berlin: German Koreans, Multiraciality, and Diaspora

Abstract

Germany is considered a relatively recent country where multiraciality has become a recognised phenomenon. Yet, Germany still considers itself a monoracial state, one where whiteness is conflated with “Germanness”. Based on interviews with seven people who are multiracial (mostly Korean–German) in Berlin, this article explores how the participants construct their multiracial identities. My findings show that participants strategically locate their identity as diasporic to circumvent racial “othering”. They utilise diasporic resources or the “raw materials” of diasporic consciousness in order to construct their multiracial identities and challenge racism and the expectations of racial and ethnic authenticity. I explored how multiracial experiences offer a different way of thinking about the actual doing and performing of diaspora.

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Rereading Diaspora: Reverberating Voices and Diasporic Listening in Italo-Australian Digital Storytelling

Abstract

The contemporary diasporic experience is fragmented and contradictory, and the notion of ‘home’ increasingly blurry. In response to these moving circumstances, many diaspora and multiculturalism studies’ scholars have turned to the everyday, focussing on the local particularities of the diasporic experience. Using the Italo-Australian digital storytelling collection Racconti: La Voce del Popolo, this paper argues that, while crucial, the everyday experience of diaspora always needs to be read in relation to broader, dislocated contexts. Indeed, to draw on Grant Farred (2009), the experience of diaspora must be read both in relation to—but always ‘out of’—context. Reading diaspora in this way helps reveal aspects of diasporic life that have the potential to productively disrupt dominant assimilationist discourses of multiculturalism that continue to dominate. This kind of re-reading is pertinent in colonial nations like Australia, whose multiculturalism rhetoric continues to echo normative whiteness.

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Adaptation to Precarious Prosperity: Is it Resignation?

Abstract

This article aims at understanding how adaptation occurs in precarious prosperity. It investigates quality of life in Switzerland using a longitudinal qualitative design. The results show that processes of adaptation tend to be similar according to relevant social experiences and that adaptation does not mean complete resignation. Furthermore, the reasoning of adapting people changes over time. This shows an internalization of the perceived norm not being satisfied. Adaptation thus contributes to the reproduction of inequalities on a societal level.

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Conditions d’autonomisation et de capacitation des partenariats entre service public de l’emploi et opérateurs privés: comparaison entre la Belgique et la Suisse francophone

Résumé

Cet article montre ce qui se déroule en amont des collaborations entre les services publics de l’emploi et les opérateurs privés en charge de l’accompagnement des demandeurs d’emploi. Il met en évidence que les modalités de contractualisation et de gouvernance du partenariat influencent la confiance et, plus spécifiquement, la manière dont un partenariat s’autonomise et dont les prestataires acquièrent plus de capacités. Trois études de cas ont été menées au sein de partenariats dont deux en Belgique francophone et une en Suisse francophone.

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Costs, Risks and Responsibility. Negotiating the Value of Disabled Workers Between Disability Insurance and Employers

Abstract

Drawing on the theoretical framework of the Economics of Convention this paper analyses the employment of people with disabilities as a valuation process. Based on case studies and interviews in business companies and disability insurance offices, it explores how employers and disability insurance determine the value of disabled workers. Inasmuch as employers are not willing to adapt performance standards, job design and work organisation, disability insurance attains individual exceptions for its clients at best, while disabling standards remain intact.

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Légitimité, omnivorité et éclectisme: goûts et dégoûts en matière d’ameublement et de décoration domestique. Etude qualitative auprès de jeunes représentants des classes moyennes supérieures

Résumé

La théorie de la légitimité culturelle telle que proposée par Pierre Bourdieu a suscité de nombreuses critiques, qui ont donné lieu à de nouveaux développements théoriques. Sans véritablement s’affranchir des thèses énoncées dans La Distinction, le modèle de l’omnivorité initié par Richard Peterson et celui de l’éclectisme défendu par Olivier Donnat ont, entre autres, passablement insisté sur la tolérance des élites et leur inclination à esthétiser la « culture populaire ». Nous appuyant sur une recherche qualitative conduite en Suisse romande, notre propos est de discuter ces théories en prenant pour objet d’étude les goûts en matière d’ameublement et de décoration domestique.

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Street-level Citizenship: le cas de la promotion de la citoyenneté dans les politiques extrascolaires de la jeunesse à Genève

Résumé

Cet article analyse la formulation et la mise en oeuvre d’une politique sociale visant à promouvoir la citoyenneté. En s’intéressant au cas de la Fondation pour l’animation socioculturelle genevoise mandatée par l’État de Genève pour « favoriser la citoyenneté active », l’article cherche à mettre en lumière la norme de citoyenneté véhiculée par l’État, mais aussi à rendre compte de sa mise en oeuvre par des animateurs socioculturels au bénéfice de dispositions individuelles et confrontés à la réalité des contextes.

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