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Open access

Asaad Ali Karam

Abstract

The research endeavor to inspect the effectiveness of “training and development” (TD) on employee performance (EP), an outcome acquired from the examination, along these lines, could be extrapolated and connected to the training incline that exists within banks that work in Erbil Kurdistan region government (KRG). The procedure was in four banks of both sectors i.e. open and private. The outcomes were acquired by utilizing structural equation modeling (SEM-PLS) on important factors by Algorithm to measure indicators in reflective way; the R2 results 0.604 employees motivation (EM), and 0.639 (EP). The goal of the examination is to seek factors affecting employee’s performance. Therefore, the findings proposed that (TD) of employees work environment, and employee’s creativity has a most significant effect on enhancing employee’s performance. The examination reasoned that with breakdown the productivity of any association which needs to get to the efficiency per unit from the input information’s.

Open access

Emira Derbel

Abstract

Censorship today has been acquainted with the action of silencing, suppressing or even making unheard and unseen what is considered as culturally and socially unacceptable. Its omnipresent and widespread aspect made the concept touches upon all literary genres among which graphic narratives by women prove to be censorship’s target. The medium’s multimodality and ability to explore culturally, socially and religiously troubling spaces has categorized feminist graphic narratives as “soft weapons” endowed with a stylistic capacity and a system of grammar to subvert and to resist control. It is in this context that that this paper procures a theoretical definition of censorship by linking it history to that of comics and graphic narratives in order to shed light on the historical ties informing today’s conflictual relation between censorship and feminist graphic narratives. By taking the example of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis and Linda Barry’s One! Hundred! Demons!, the study stresses the capacity of graphic narratives to elude the gaze of the censor through the adaptation of different evasive techniques.

Open access

Yves Robichaud, Jean-Charles Cachon, Abdellatif Taghzouti, Abdelouahid Assaidi and José Nicolas Barragan Codina

Abstract

This research tried to identify similarities and differences in motives between male urban entrepreneurs from Mexico and Morocco. The Mexican sample of 192 respondents was drawn from Chambers of Commerce listings in Guadalajara and Monterrey. The Moroccan sample of 222 respondents came from the Fès-Meknès region. In both countries a majority of entrepreneurs went into business by necessity and pursued monetary goals in order to secure their financial future for their families and for themselves. Larger cohorts of younger entrepreneurs were present in Mexico, where female spouses tended to be more often involved in their husband’s business and contributing more to family income, as compared to Morocco. In Mexico, a larger proportion of entrepreneurs were also expressing a very strong interest for intrinsic goals involving self-actualization, meeting challenges, while Moroccan respondents were more in search for autonomy and independence besides pursuing extrinsic or financial goals. Results generally confirm results obtained elsewhere in Africa and Latin America.

Open access

Somchat Boonsri, Phadungchai Pupat and Peerawut Suwanjan

Abstract

Due to rapid change in technology, enterprises are facing a shortage of competent human resources that are suitable for their needs. The Dual Vocational Training Program, which emphasizes authentic training for enterprises, is able to develop human resources from vocational education so that their competencies are up to date competencies, to keep up with technological changes. The purpose of this study was to conduct a second order confirmatory factor analysis of occupational competencies in enterprises. The samples of this study were 804 students of the Vocational Education Certificate Program, in the field of Mechanical Technology. They were selected by using Multi-Stage Random Sampling. The instrument used was a 5 level rating scale questionnaire. The results of the study indicated that the Model of Occupational Competency in Enterprise of Dual Vocational Training Students is valid. The structural equation statistical values were: Chi-square = 896.0707, df = 514, p = .000, χ2/df = 1.47 (less than 2.0), GFI = .945, AGFI = .920, and RMSEA = .030.

Open access

Siti Hamin Stapa, Kesumawati A Bakar and Fuzirah Hashim

Abstract

Malaysia is currently one of the largest producers and exporters of palm oil in the world. Despite the strength and vast potential of our palm oil industry, engaging the youth in this industry is a challenging task as most perceive the industry and agriculture unattractive as a career, without realising the importance of the sector in their everyday lives. Furthermore, the development of sectors such as ecommerce, digital technology and real estate is a compounding factor behind the decline of interest among the younger FELDA generation. The present study is designed to examine the attitudes and motivation of young FELDA generation towards the palm oil industry. A simple random sampling technique was adopted to select 50 working respondents from the age of 22-40 at 4 FELDA settlements. Questionnaire was distributed for primary data collection, where a four-point Likert scale was used to examine differences in attitudes and motivation towards 64 statements regarding aspects ranging from working conditions to promotion opportunities. The findings point to an overall positive attitude towards all aspects of the industry. The highest mean is revealed in the area of social status, with the majority feeling respected and proud to be a part of the palm oil community. In general, the majority of the respondents display positive attitude and motivation towards the palm oil industry. Based on the findings we would recommend trainings to empower FELDA youths to take advantage of the expanding industry and to claim their space in the palm oil sector.

Open access

Genoveva Millán Vázquez de la Torre, Virginia Navajas-Romero and Ricardo Hernández Rojas

Abstract

Although the immigrant population in Spain has decreased due to the economic crisis of the past five years, few studies have analysed this group. The objective of this research has been to profile the immigrant who decides to start a business in Spain. In order to learn about the probability of immigrant workers being entrepreneurs as a function of their socio-demographic characteristics, data from the Spanish National Institute of Statistics from 2005 to 2016 have been analysed and fieldwork carried out during August and September 2016 on immigrants who are self-employed. The results show a lower rate of entrepreneurship in the immigrant population vis-a-vis the native population and the fact that creating their own business begins at an earlier age for immigrants when compared to the national average.

Open access

Mª Genoveva Dancausa Millán, Ricardo David Hernandez Rojas and Javier Sánchez-Rivas García

Abstract

Visiting places where death is present, either due to a natural tragedy, war, the Holocaust, etc., or because there is the presence of a non-visible entity or paranormal phenomenon, is increasingly more accepted in modern times. It has become a kind of tourism that has grown in demand, though it remains a minority. The city of Cordoba, in the south of Spain, is swarming with houses and places where legends have endured over centuries as a consequence of the coexistence of three cultures – Jewish, Christian and Arab. In turn, popular culture considers these places as having a characteristic “charm” due to the phenomena that happen there. This work analyses the profile of dark tourism tourists, particularly in two sub-segments - that of ghosts and of cemeteries - as well as the existing offer. The aim is to design and improve a quality tourist product that is adapted to the requirements of the demand.

Open access

Don Mayer and Adam Sulkowski

Abstract

The two Emoluments Clauses in the U.S. Constitution forbid federal officials from accepting “any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatsoever” from foreign or domestic governments. President Donald Trump’s business interests generate numerous opportunities to use public office for his personal benefit. This article examines the history of the Emoluments Clauses and the Framers’ conception of corruption. The conflicts of interest alleged in pending emoluments lawsuits against President Trump would not be allowable in the private sector, and various plaintiffs argue that the Emoluments Clauses apply to all public officials, including the President. The President’s lawyers have claimed he is exempt from the application of these clauses and have raised numerous procedural objections, such as challenging who might have” standing” to bring a lawsuit to compel his compliance with the clauses. Out of three cases filed in 2017, one has been dismissed, while two judges have recognized that the plaintiffs have standing. In each lawsuit, the President’s lawyers insist on a conception of corruption that is quid pro quo, where only bargained for exchanges count as corruption. While the Emoluments Clauses require public officials to get Congressional permission before receiving such benefits, the President’s position is that Congress must first demand an accounting of any personal benefits, rather than the burden being on the President to ask permission. Thus far, two courts have rejected that approach, and as of this writing, further appeals can be expected.

Open access

Joseph D’Agostino

Abstract

Highly influential legal scholar and judge Richard Posner, newly retired from the bench, believes that law is irrelevant to most of his judicial decisions as well as to most constitutional decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. His recent high-profile repudiation of the rule of law, made in statements for the general public, was consistent with what he and others have been saying to legal audiences for decades. Legal pragmatism has reached its end in abandoning all the restraints of law. Posner-endorsed “epistemological democracy” obscures a discretion that is much worse than the rule of law promoted by epistemological authoritarianism. I argue that a focus on conceptual essentialism and on the recognition of coercive intent as essential to the concept of law, both currently unpopular among legal theorists and many jurists, can clarify legal understandings and serve as starting points for the restoration of the rule of law. A much more precise, scientific approach to legal concepts is required in order to best ensure the rational and moral legitimacy of law and to combat eroding public confidence in political and legal institutions, especially in an increasingly diverse society. The rational regulation by some (lawmakers) of the real-world actions of others (ordinary citizens) requires that core or central instances of concepts have essential elements rather than be “democratic.” Although legal pragmatism has failed just as liberal theory generally has failed, the pragmatic value of different conceptual approaches is, in fact, the best measure of their worth. Without essentialism in concept formation and an emphasis on coercion, the abilities to understand and communicate effectively about the practical legal world are impaired. Non-essentialism grants too much unwarranted discretion to judges and other legal authorities, and thus undermines the rule of law. Non-essentialist or anti-essentialist conceptual approaches allow legal concepts to take on characteristics appropriate to religious and literary concepts, which leads to vague and self-contradictory legal concepts that incoherently and deceptively absorb disparate elements that are best kept independent in order to maximize law’s rationality and moral legitimacy. When made essentialist, the concept of political positive law shrinks, clarifies, and reveals its true features, including the physically-coercive nature of all laws and the valuable method of tracing the content of law by following its coercive intents and effects.

Open access

Thomas Halper

Abstract

The first amendment does not protect all speech. Should it protect lies? Some argue that the state should intervene to prevent and punish lying because the people are insufficiently rational (they are too emotional, and, therefore vulnerable) or excessively rational (they find it too costly to investigate claims and are, therefore, vulnerable). Others retort that state officials are not neutral or objective, but have their own interests to advance and protect, and, therefore, cannot be trusted. Though certain kinds of lying, like fraud and perjury, are clearly not protected speech, courts have recently seemed sympathetic to the view that the proper response to lying is not government action, but the workings of the marketplace of ideas. The distinguished economist, Ronald Coase, has taken this argument much farther, applying it to commercial speech, but thus far his views have not prevailed.