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Gabriel Hasmațuchi, in front of the palette of cultural alternatives

Abstract

The „obsession” of Gabriel Hasmațuchi in his book Cultural alternatives (Techno Media, Sibiu, 20181) is the destiny of Romanian culture. The traditional conflict between archaic and modern in Romanian culture and society is being studied in some of its contemporaneous manifestations. The author believes that both the traditionalists and the modernists of this Romanian debate have contributed constructively over the years.

Open access
Hermeneutical Perspectives In Matei Vişniec’s Poetical Discourse

Abstract

In Matei Vişniec’s literature, there is a gap between poetry and theater, which consists primarily on the ability of creating, in both species mentioned, areas or dramatic situations by using a parabolic or symbolic dimension of images. Matei Vişniec wrote poems that follow closely to the plays he wrote, which both his poems and plays including the same ingredients: the presence of characters, narrative situations, symbols, irony, and life seen as a complex spectacle. By using fantasy, the poet tends to transfer reality in a symbolic gap between the surface image and the depth image. Therefore, we will discuss two crucial aspects that involve the semnification of the theatrical dimension of look, by analysing a couple of important example of poems from his books and by consulting some critical point of views. In his poetry, we will find an interesting perspective of the so called the overturned look, which involves the relation of approaching and distancing between the surface image and the depth image. The first meaning of this dimension is to reveal a daily spectacle of life by presenting his apparently ordinary situations and people. In this case, the concept of mask will be discussed and its relation between essence and appearance. The second meaning involves the aspects that underline the loneliness and anxiety in the modern times.

Open access
Ion D. Sîrbu, a classic of the Romanian literature

Abstract

The essay dedicated to I. D. Sîrbu comes in the context of celebrating 100 years since the birth of the great novelist, playwriter and essayist. I insisted at the beginning of the essay on his relationship with Lucian Blaga, professor of philosophy during the time of the refuge of the University “Regele Ferdinand I” from Cluj to Sibiu (1940-1944), focusing on the catalytic influence of the professor in the formation process of the young writers. Lucian Blaga was in favour of a bright “paideic model” like Socrate’s maieutics.

Open access
Lucian Blaga and Constantin Noica’s beginnings under the sign of elective approaches

Abstract

Since he was a high school student in Bucharest, Constantin Noica was fascinated by Lucian Blaga’s philosophical, poetical, and dramaturgical evolution. Between the Two World Wars in Romania only few people managed to understand the expressionist vision in Lucian Blaga’s theater. More notable is the precise intuition with which the young Constantin Noica noticed the extraordinary value of Master Manole, which was played both in Romania and in Switzerland. Later on, this was considered to be Lucian Blaga’s most outstanding dramatic play. In the decades to come, Professor and Academician Lucian Blaga kept Constantin Noica in a high esteem.

Open access
On the Origins of the Japanese Language

Abstract

In this article, I deal with the historical development of the Japanese language by applying a multi-disciplinary approach that uses data from a variety of fields. My research indicates that the home-land of the Japonic language family may have been in the lower Yangtze River Valley, from where its speakers moved to the Korean Peninsula and eventually to Japan during the Yayoi period. This spread is associated with the dispersal of wet rice agriculture from the area south of the Yangtze River via the northeastern Asian mainland, where it was in contact with cultures cultivating millet. Old Japanese mythology and genealogical data suggests that the earliest known ethnic group that spoke Japonic may have been the Hayato people of southern Kyūshū.1

Open access
The Online Image of the Romanian Gendarmerie after the Diaspora Protest on August 10, 2018: Crisis Communication Strategies

Abstract

In this study we conducted a research on the Facebook page of the Romanian Gendarmerie, to understand the magnitude of the effects of the crisis this institution is facing after the Diaspora Protest ended in violence. We monitored the posts from August 10 to December 31, 2018 and analyzed the most relevant 50 comments from each post, in order to determine their character: positive, negative or neutral. In conducting this study, we started from the hypothesis that this event has affected the image of the Romanian Gendarmerie in the long time, and the crisis communication strategies used by the representatives of this institution have made a significant contribution to postponing the image restoration.

Open access
The Philippines and Vietnam’s Responses to the Permanent Court of Arbitration’s Final Award on the Arbitration Case Initiated by the Philippines Against China over the South China Sea (July 2016)

Abstract

In July 2016, the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) issued its final award on the South China Sea dispute between the Philippines and China that caught the attention of the international community. Since this was the first time that a claimant in the South China Sea had ever referred the case to an international juridical body in an effort to settle the dispute, the responses of both claimant and non-claimant stakeholders were awaited. Realising the relevance of the issue, I conduct a comparative study of the responses to the PCA’s final award to two major claimants with similar positions on the South China Sea—the Philippines and Vietnam. The main aim of this study is to indicate the similarities and/or differences in the way these two states responded to the final decisions of the PCA. The study finds that even though both the Philippines and Vietnam reacted to the award in a similar manner, the motives behind their responses were different. In general, the South China Sea policy of the Philippines has always been less consistent than that of Vietnam, which can be explained through each state’s foreign policy tendencies.

Open access
Queer Desire in Japanese TV Series

Abstract

This article provides an analysis of representations of sexual minorities in Japanese TV series. It outlines how homosexual and queer desire is depicted and how stereotypes and tropes are used in the construction of queer characters in this media format. The article also illuminates the ways in which TV series differentiate between depictions of same-sex romance and opposite-sex romance. The corpus of analysed TV series spans a period of twenty-five years. Thus, the analysis also sheds light on changes in the representation of sexual minorities over time. Examples from recent TV series point to a more positive and sometimes didactic approach towards the topic of homosexuality in Japanese mainstream media.

Open access
School on the screen: promises and deviations of the new educational technologies

Abstract

The school can therefore accommodate television screens and computers but provided they are confined to specific practices, limited, criticized, to allow time and space for a transmission of knowledge, know-how and skills which require a group, microcosm of humanity, and an authority, carrying values and ends. The screen must lose all its fantastic power, its omnipresence, to remain a complementary and partial tool in a school world, a space and a time proper, intended to instruct and educate the pupil or the student, to lead him towards a citizenship that is not confused with a consumer or with a player on screens.

Open access
Songs of Japanese Prisoners of War in the Soviet Union after World War II

Abstract

The Second World War ended with Japan’s capitulation after the disastrous nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Subsequently, approximately 700,000 Japanese soldiers were selected as captives to undertake physical labour in Soviet prison camps. After returning to Japan, some of them wrote about their lives in the Soviet Union, drew pictures about their experiences, or wrote about their favourite songs that they had sung during their imprisonment.

My study of various reports of Japanese prisoners of war (POWs) after the Second World War surprisingly revealed that not only traumatic conditions during forced labour were published, but also social interactions in the form of joint artistic activities such as making music, producing theatre plays, and staging sports competitions. The prisoners have often retrospectively described these as strikingly positive events during their years of internment in the Soviet Union. This article analyses a total of thirty-four songs sung and composed by Japanese POWs during captivity on a lyrical level (text analysis). In doing so, I adopt a new approach to interpreting the social conditions during the imprisonment of Japanese soldiers in the Soviet Union.

Open access