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Abstract

The Peak District is an upland region in central Britain with a rich mining geoheritage. It was established as the UK’s first National Park in 1951. It was the region, due to its widespread loss quarries and mines sites to inappropriate remedial measures, which led to the recognition and promotion of the modern geotourism paradigm. It is the birthplace of British geotourism with the earliest recorded instances of leisure travellers purposefully choosing to visit mines and caves. Metalliferous mining in the region can be traced back to the Bronze Age. Gangue minerals, especially fluorspar and barites, later became significant primary extraction activities and underpinned a small-scale semi-precious stone industry. It is home to the World Heritage inscribed site of the Derwent Mills, significant in the development of early Industrial Revolution textile technology and manufacturing practices. The almost equally significant mining geoheritage has yet to be similarly recognised and, indeed, its survival is still threatened because most tourism and many mining geoheritage stakeholders have a limited understanding of geo-history and the geo-interpretive significance of the individuals and geosites that shaped historical geotourism and geological exploration in the Peak District; their exploits and the legacy of their publications, alongside its superbly exposed and well researched geology and associated mining geoheritage, could underpin a bid for the region’s recognition as a geopark. Hence, this introductory paper summarises the key aspects of the region’s geology and major mining geoheritage sites, together with the major works and influence of some key individuals that should be included as a very minimum in such a bid.

Abstract

The region of Homolje in Eastern Serbia represents an area rich with numerous geological and geomorphological features, especially karst formations which are excellent representatives of this area’s geodiversity. However, the geotourism potential of these geosites still remains fully unrevealed. In this paper we analyzed the most representative ones based mainly on their aesthetic value as well as their geotourism potential. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the geotourism potential of Homolje and to determine its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as well as interactions between them when it comes to tourism development. The results of the SWOT and TOWS analysis indicate that Homolje as a tourist destination possesses immense geotourism potential but is still in the exploration phase according to the Butler tourist cycle of destination evolution. Research results also identify four different strategies which can be applied as solutions for current problems and for further tourism development.

Abstract

In the Ostrava part of the Upper Silesian Basin there are many geotouristic sites connected with the underground mining of Carboniferous bituminous coal. Text is focused on those related to the geology of the Basin and environmental issues connected to coal mining. Of great intrest are outcrops of Mississippian sediments of the paralic Ostrava Formation, as well as two most important museums with permanent geological exhibitions. Some interesting geological features conncted to younger periods of Quarternary glaciation are also mentioned. Two types of publicly accessible sites related to the environmental burdens (burning coal heaps, saline mine water drainage system) are also described.

Abstract

The geological landscape is an excellent topic for a better enhancement of the sustainable tourism. Considering Landscape as the result of the endogenous and exogenous activities that form the Earth's surface, and/or as the result of the interaction of many natural and cultural components, it is almost mandatory the use of such a theme as an informative vector in Environment Sciences popularization. Modern technology offers new powerful tools to reach and share a complete knowledge on the territory (intended as the integration between natural and cultural components). The overlay of thematic maps (geological, geomorphological, physiographic maps) as well as the integration of collected data allows us to identify the areas of greater natural and cultural value. The outdoor sports, expecially cycling and ski, give us an opportunity to talk about the territory, referring to its natural and cultural history; GIS and 3D modelling, are flexible and friendly tools in educational plans as well as in territorial promotion, fitting for the purpose of a twinning with TV sport transmission, as confirmed by the GeoloGiro experience (Geology at the Giro d’Italia 2013/14/15/16). The prototypical App here proposed, will show the landscape where the sports are played, through the visualisation of thematic maps and correlated images (3D modelling, animation, cartoons) integrating information on local environment and culture: the “LandscApp”. We argue that special attention should be devoted to the link between landscapes, wine tourism and sports, and that this new field would spur new actions to promote sustainable development in Italy, as well as a more sensible culture of responsible wine consumption.

Abstract

In the first part of the study, we have pointed out that mining tourism is a new, undervalued and less used a form of tourism, geotourism. We present its definition and present its specifics that make it unique on such a scale - by which it can be defined as a separate form of tourism. Mining tourism can be thought to contain virtually all objects, phenomena and processes, which, from prehistory till today, were related to one of the oldest human activities - mining and their subsequent access to and inclusion in tourism. In the world, underground quarries are currently used for various purposes, such as environmental, cultural centers, concert halls, wineries, churches, warehouses, and tourist destinations.In the second part of the study, we deal with mining tourism on the example of the most extensive underground stone quarry in Slovakia. Quarry, Veľká Stráň currently serves as the goal of unorganized ‘mining‘ natural tourism as part of a geological site protected as a nature reserve. However, underground stone has the potential to become the destination of organized mining tourism not only for school educational excursions but also for the general public.

Abstract

The eastern Kii Peninsula exhibits a variety of rock outcrops, fossils, and other geological features that illustrate the formation history of the Japanese Islands. This work aims to describe the geotourism potential of the region based on the significant rock exposures, and sets out the basis for establishing geosites in this region in the future. Geologically important sites have been selected, together with places of unique history and culture within the northern part of the eastern Kii Peninsula, including the Ise and Toba areas. The results of this study include a detailed description of the geology and history of the region, together with an evaluation of the relative value of each selected locality as a geosite. Proper development and promotion of the proposed sites would make the sites available for education and tourism, and provide opportunities for suitable development and the popularization of geological knowledge.

Abstract

Post-mining workings, especially after the exploitation of the rocks, become attractive mainly because of their landscape forms. These new forms of landscape can be an important element of tourist interest, and can cause the regional tourist revival. Quarries, as a quite specific forms, may, however, be received by individuals, as more or less attractive. The existing methods of landscape attractiveness evaluation cannot be directly applied to assess the attractiveness of abandoned quarries without the introduction of some partial criteria. The article attempts to present the methodological basis of the procedure for evaluating the attractiveness of the landscape of the quarries by setting new criteria for such an assessment. To do this, the method of semantic differential, called the Osgood’s Method, was used, as well as principles of entropy and point bonitation. The evaluation of the attractiveness of the quarries’ landscape consists of the results of these methods. On such basis, four classes of the attractiveness of the landscape of abandoned quarries have been defined.

Abstract

The Archaeological Mines Park of San Silvestro is part of the Campiglia mining area. It represents its most important historical core. The Park covers a surface of around 450 hectares on the mountains Calvi, Rombolo, Poggio all’Aione and along the valleys Temperino, Lanzi and Manienti. The main characteristic of the Park is the richness of mining activity traces towards copper, lead and silver. The mining activity started during the 7th century BC with the Etruscan civilization and continued until 1979, when the last mine was closed. Many karst cavities of the Campiglia are “cave-mines’: they are the result of a natural event and the action of ancient miners, who searched metalliferous minerals. In Campiglia there are traces of hundreds of Etruscan, medieval and modern mining operations, tunnels from the 19th and 20th centuries. The aim of the Archaeological and Mining park of San Silvestro is to highlight historical landscape, the result of centuries of mining activities. Some of the buildings, originally used for productive and administrative purposes, have been restored to house exhibitions and services for visitors. The impressive ruins of the medieval village of San Silvestro and two of the modern mining tunnels, have been equipped for guided tours. The accessibility of ancient mining works is however still difficult and this represents a limit in the enhancement and protection of these sites. Speleologists, archaeologists and geologists will be involved in making a project to let everyone discover the most ancient underground mines. We have three main targets: (1) produce high quality pictures of the most interesting and impressive mining traces; (2) create 3D models useful for scientific and cultural purposes; (3) equip some of the ancient shafts with light structures to allow small groups to visit them. We will describe the morphological characteristics of one of these ancient mines, giving some advice for the production of high quality picture in this contest. We will also describe the technique used for the production of a 3D model and how to equip the mine for the visit of small groups of people.