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Aleksandra Gajda and Mayumi Oie

Abstract

The aim of the study was to analyze creativity profiles and understanding of creativity in Poland and Japan. The study included 597 participants (233 Polish and 364 Japanese). Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out (mixed method). We identified the existence of five different creativity profiles and ten categories for defining creativity, with significant differences in frequency between the two countries. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of intercultural differences and the individualism / collectivism theory (Hofstede, 1983).

Open access

Sameh Said-Metwaly, Wim Van den Noortgate and Eva Kyndt

Abstract

This paper presents a review of the literature on the measurement of creativity. Creativity definitions are discussed as a starting point for understanding the nature of this construct. The four major approaches to measuring creativity (process, person, product and press) are reviewed, pointing out commonly used instruments as well as the advantages and weaknesses of each approach. This review reveals that the measurement of creativity is an unsettled issue, and that the existing instruments purporting to measure creativity suffer from serious conceptual and psychometric shortcomings. Research gaps and suggestions for future research are discussed.

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Art History & Criticism

Meno istorija ir kritika

Open access

Martin Soukup

Abstract

The objective of the paper is to provide an overview of currencies used by natives of Near Oceania in relation to three principal ways of its use. The author explains three main functions of currencies from Near Oceania on selected examples. The three main functions are as follows: standardized medium of exchange, bride-price, and sociopolitical exchange. These functions are demonstrated on selected types of currencies from East Sepik, Massim, Western Highlands, and West Papua. The author provides, in addition to the description of artefacts, interpretation of social and cultural context of its use.

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Pavel Onderka, Vlastimil Vrtal and Alexander Gatzsche

Abstract

The thirteenth excavation season of the Archaeological Expedition to Wad Ben Naga focused on archaeological exploration of the Typhonium (WBN 200) and the nearby cemetery WBN C200, as well as on conservation of structures located in Central Wad Ben Naga.

Open access

Pavel Onderka

Abstract

In 2012, the National Museum – Náprstek Museum accessioned a collection of 13 Egyptian antiquities from the original ownership of Jaroslav Šejnoha, who served as the Czechoslovak Ambassador to Egypt between 1944 and 1946. The collection consists of 13 highly interesting pieces, dating of which spans from the Pre-Dynastic to Greco-Roman Periods.

Open access

Filip Coppens

Abstract

The article takes a closer look at a specific feature of the Nile, and more in particular an aspect of its life bringing inundation known to the ancient Egyptian priests as Keku (“Darkness”). This facet of the inundation occurs seven times among the gifts brought by offering bearers in hydrological processions on the soubassement in the Horus temple of Edfu, the Opet temple at Karnak, the Hathor temple of Dendara and the small Isis temple of Dendara dating from the reigns of Ptolemaios IV Philopator (221–204 BCE) to that of Emperor Nero (54–68 CE). The study of its location on the temple walls as well as the inscriptions accompanying this specific personification of the Nile inundation indicates the existence of patterns in the distribution of these texts not only within a single temple, but also between temples over time and space.

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Helena Heroldová

Abstract

The study based on the preparation of Příběh Tibetu [The Story of Tibet] exhibition in the Náprstek Museum focuses on the de-contextualisation of Tibetan Buddhism objects in the museum setting. It deals with the stages of the decontextualisation process from the removing of the original material environment and social context to creation of new meanings in the museum. Namely it discusses aestheticisation and its relation to the art-gallery style exhibition.

Open access

Gabriela Jungová

Abstract

J. V. Daneš (1880–1928) was not only an outstanding figure of his time in the international scientific community, but also a diplomat and a traveller. Two of his overseas trips led him to Australia and the Pacific region, where he assembled a remarkable collection of ethnographic objects and photographs. This collection, now kept in the National Museum – Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures in Prague, has been mostly neglected and unpublished for decades. This paper provides a basis for its further study by introducing Daneš’s journeys around the region and comparing them to the proveniences of the ethnographic objects.