Browse

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 238 items for :

  • Human Resources, Labor Practice, Job and Career x
Clear All
Open access

Margaret Heffernan and Eoin Rochford

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine whether social networks reduce the effects of psychological contract breach on an employee’s intention to leave the organisation. This paper focusses on two particular elements of the social network in an organisation: (1) social status and (2) local ties/connectedness. Using a sample of 242 responses from officers in the Irish Defence Forces, the results provide empirical evidence of the impact of psychological contract breach on officer turnover intentions. The results also demonstrate that perceptions of social networks moderate the relationship between psychological contract breach and turnover intentions through social status. Contrary to expectations, strong connectedness with senior officers was also found to be a moderator but not in the direction that was hypothesised. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

Open access

Judith Breen

Abstract

The field of management education has been the focus of much debate in recent times regarding the relevancy of its content and process. How we define relevance has implications for all stakeholders of management. As a result, how applicable are the alternative approaches to management education such as critical management education (CME). This research explores how criticality is perceived, experienced, and translated into the everyday practices of critical management educators. The research found that there was a common theme about criticality relating to questioning taken-for-granted assumptions about management and its practices. However, distinctions were made between those whose interests were more theoretically, politically, or practically oriented. From the findings, two critical educator types emerged. These were the critical experientialists and the critical traditionalists. This research provides an understanding of the critical classroom through educator perceptions and practices. In doing so, it enlightens the management educator further as to what it means to be critical.

Open access

Jeff Hughes and Joe McDonagh

Abstract

This paper aims to illustrate how the case study methodology may be used in novel and productive ways for research into strategy practice. Instigated by the quest for a research design that could target the ‘practice’ of strategic information systems planning (SISP), a review of the strategy-as-practice (SAP) literature uncovered parallels with the SISP domain from a methodological standpoint. A SAP perspective was employed in conjunction with the case study methodology to investigate SISP (the strategy practice) on the part of senior managers (the practitioners) at the meso level (the level of praxis). Ultimately, this approach was found to offer original insights and uncover valuable new directions for future academic enquiry.

Open access

Christine Cross and Michelle O’Sullivan

Open access

Aidan Duane and Philip O’Reilly

Abstract

There is little understanding of how organisations manage social media. Stage-of-growth (SoG) models represent a picture of evolution, where the current stage can be understood in terms of history and future, providing an opportunity to identify the stages, paths of evolution, benchmark variables, and dominant problems experienced by organisations at each stage. Following a review of 4 decades of SoG model research, as well as a review of existing social media research and practitioner insight across multiple domains, the authors adopt Gottschalk and Solli-Sæther’s (2010) five-step stage modelling process as a research methodology to develop a SoG model for managing a social media business profile (SMBP). The paper develops and validates Step 1 (suggested stage model) and Step 2 (conceptual stage model) of the stage modelling process. A number of key contributions to theory and practice are identified, and ongoing research to further refine the model is outlined.

Open access

Rachel Kidney, Brian Harney and Colm O’Gorman

Abstract

Relative to the overall population of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), high-growth SMEs (HGSMEs) make a disproportionate contribution to economic growth. While research has identified factors that characterise HGSMEs, it is yet to provide a comprehensive explanation of the growth process. The purpose of the study is to identify specific growth events and examine how HGSMEs successfully transition through these periods in terms of operational (i.e. management systems and practices), structural, and strategic changes. Drawing from a descriptive profiling of Irish HGSMEs, four indepth case studies are presented. Analysis suggests a complex relationship between structure and growth, illuminating how HGSMEs experience trigger points that create a momentum of growth, which in turn mandates a supportive infrastructure.

Open access

Mary P. Murphy

Abstract

The paper examines various rationales for applying equality and human rights proofing mechanisms to fiscal policy. The principle of using available resources to the maximum to progressively realise human rights, and not to erode the revenue capacity of developing nations to do likewise, is at the heart of emerging human rights norms. To date, Irish budgetary processes and major policy statements such as the Commission on Taxation or the draft outline National Plan on Business and Human Rights Strategy have not engaged with the principles of maximising available resources or extraterritoriality. Proofing fiscal policy is also relevant from the perspective of fiscal welfare where taxation instruments, traditionally used as a revenue-gathering mechanism, are increasingly used as distributional mechanisms to achieve policy outcomes in pensions, health, housing and employment, with important equality and distributive dimensions, particularly from gender, age and socioeconomic perspectives. A number of practical institutional mechanisms and evaluative questions can guide equality and human rights proofing of fiscal policy, but commitments to maximise resources to realise rights also need to be promoted through a public discourse which sees taxation as potential investment in society rather than a burden or cost on the economy.

Open access

Chris McInerney

Abstract

This article examines the role of social/poverty impact assessment in contributing to the shaping of policy at a local level in Ireland. In doing so, it briefly describes the broader impact assessment landscape internationally, presenting key definitions and identifying underlying principles. From this the article highlights the key elements of social impact assessment, proposing a three-phase process to guide consideration of impact assessment, namely a pre-assessment phase, an assessment phase and a post-assessment phase. An analysis of these different phases then allows for a range of technical and more ‘theological’ assessment complexities to be presented. With this background in place, the article moves on to examine the local-level experience in Ireland. It acknowledges the highly innovative nature of poverty proofing as originally introduced in 1998 and retitled poverty impact assessment following a 2006 review by the Office for Social Inclusion. However, it points to the low level of engagement with poverty impact assessment processes at local level and suggests that poverty impact assessments have become largely subservient to other forms of impact assessment, particularly strategic environmental assessment. The article concludes that the local level does offer an important space for the practice of poverty impact assessment, but is unlikely to do so without the provision of appropriate capacity and resources, or without it being hardwired as a legislative obligation, albeit accompanied by mechanisms to sensitise and incentivise policymakers towards its usage.