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Celebrating 50 years of haemophilia care at the Royal Free Hospital

Abstract

In recent decades, few disorders have benefited more from scientific research than haemophilia. Those living with the condition have witnessed improved standards of care resulting in dramatic improvements in quality of life. The Katharine Dormandy Haemophilia Centre and Thrombosis Unit has made a proud contribution to this improvement in care.

Open access
Diagnosis and management of inhibitors: the need for professional collaboration

Abstract

Advances in the understanding of haemophilia require effective collaboration, both at the national and international levels. Such collaborations are currently playing a major role in elucidating the natural history of acquired haemophilia, and also in clarifying the issue of product-related inhibitor development in previously untreated patients with haemophilia.

Open access
Gene therapy for haemophilia: a very modern success story

Abstract

AAV-mediated gene therapy has the potential to be paradigm shifting as a treatment for haemophilia. A single administration of AAV vector can result in safe and consistent long-term expression of transgene (>5 years), reduction in spontaneous bleeding episodes, reduction in clotting factor usage and an improvement in quality of life. There is huge commercial interest in this approach, with the expectation that an AAV gene therapy product for haemophilia B will be licensed by 2020.

Open access
Gynaecological and obstetric care for women with inherited bleeding disorders

Abstract

The issue of women with bleeding disorders was first reported by Professor von Willebrand in 1926, but it is only from around the mid 1990s that the issue has been fully recognised. Much of this is due to the vision and hard work of Professor Christine Lee and colleagues at the Katharine Dormandy Haemophilia Centre. This work has led to better diagnosis, better quality care and improved quality of life for women with bleeding disorders.

Open access
International databases open the door to improved care for rare bleeding disorders

Abstract

The development of registries through international collaboration has facilitated better understanding of the rare bleeding disorders. Such work has shown that rare bleeding disorders are heterogeneous and need to be studied singularly, and that heterozygous patients may bleed. There is a need to understand the minimum plasma coagulant activity level to prevent spontaneous bleeding. Moreover, due to the low prevalence of rare bleeding disorders, the management of this patient population remains a challenge. Data collection on clinical history, efficacy and side effects of treatment needs to be harmonised.

Open access
Into the future with novel emerging therapies for haemophilia

Abstract

Patients with haemophilia have benefited hugely from the advances in basic science achieved over the past 50 years. The introduction of clotting factor concentrates opened the door to home treatment and the subsequent availability of plasma and then recombinant products heralded the prophylaxis era. As clinicians and patients begin to manage the introduction of longer-acting factor concentrates, there are also many novel therapies and approaches in development, many of which offer the potential to transform the lives for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders and their families.

Open access
Literature Review: Transition From Paediatric to Adult Services in Haemophilia

Abstract

The need to prepare children and young people with haemophilia for long-term care in the adult sector has long been accepted and is reflected in many national health care policies. Ideally, transition should be an individualised age- and development-appropriate process, through which each young person is empowered to self-manage, with support from their families and multidisciplinary team (MDT). It is widely recognised that young people who are not engaged in self-management frequently become non-adherent to therapy. For those with haemophilia, this can have a life-long impact on joint health and quality of life. In practice, anecdotal reports from individuals suggest that the transition process is often poorly planned, leaving them feeling lost and unsupported by the healthcare professionals who, until this point, have been core members of their support network. Rarely are the views of young people or their families sought regarding the outcome of their transition process. For those with less severe disease or rarer bleeding disorders, and for girls at the menarche, transition is often not addressed at all. This literature review forms the first part of a project that seeks to identify the outcome measures that can be used to drive a nurse-led initiative improvement in transition for young people with bleeding disorders, through changes in both working practices among health professionals and in the underpinning system, which enables them to put such changes into practice.

Open access
The modern challenges of haemophilia care in childhood and adolescence

Abstract

Modern haemophilia care based on good diagnosis and effective prophylaxis has allowed boys born with haemophilia to grow up leading essentially normal lives. Nevertheless, there remain challenges notably those posed by inhibitors and patient expectations. There is now a significant cohort of men in their 30s, 40s and 50s who have been looked after extremely well but many of whom now have significant ankle arthropathy because they played football, even when advised not to do so at a time when prophylaxis was limited or started late. The imminent era of longer-acting clotting factors and gene therapy will also impact on future patient expectations. Meeting and managing these challenges will be much enhanced by the development and maintenance of good relationships between the patient and the haemophilia team.

Open access
Musculoskeletal care in haemophilia: the importance of the joint team approach

Abstract

The multidisciplinary team approach to providing comprehensive care is the cornerstone of the management of musculoskeletal issues in haemophilia. At the Royal Free the team takes a holistic approach to musculoskeletal disease management that is not just about assessment of a painful knee or having an operation. It recognises that patients sit on a spectrum of musculoskeletal disease severity that is dependent on age and the type of treatments available and the issues that may have been experienced with those treatments. The patient’s own goals sit at the heart of the team’s approach.

Open access
The road to cloning of factor VIII and the recombinant era

Abstract

Use of recombinant clotting factor now represents the standard of care in haemophilia across the developed world. But the recombinant era would not have occurred without the isolation from plasma of factor VIII in sufficient quantities to allow characterisation and cloning. Much of this development work occurred at the Royal Free Hospital.

Open access