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Open access

Christian Tronstad and Runar Strand-Amundsen

Abstract

The relation between a biological process and the changes in passive electrical properties of the tissue is often non-linear, in which developing prediction models based on bioimpedance spectra is not trivial. Relevant information on tissue status may also lie in characteristic developments in the bioimpedance spectra over time, often neglected by conventional methods. The aim of this study was to explore possibilities in machine learning methods for time series of bioimpedance spectra, where we used organ ischemia as an example. Based on published data on the development of the bioimpedance spectrum during liver ischemia, a simulation model was made and used to generate sets of synthetic data with different levels of organ-to-organ variation, measurement noise and drift. Three types of artificial neural networks were employed in learning to predict the ischemic duration, based on the simulated datasets. The simulated prediction performance was very dependent on the amount of training examples, the organ-to-organ variation and the selection of input variables from the bioimpedance spectrum. The performance was also affected by noise and drift in the measurement, but a recurrent neural network with long short-term memory units could obtain good predictions even on noisy and drifting measurements. This approach may be relevant for further exploration on several applications of bioimpedance having the purpose of predicting a biological state based on spectra measured over time.

Open access

Mart Min

Abstract

The first issue of the Journal of Electrical Bioimpedance saw the light in 2010 by the personal initiative of two men from the University of Oslo, Prof. Sverre Grimnes and Prof. Ørjan G. Martinsen, who has been the editor-in-chief of our Journal during all these ten years. With the sense of gratitude, we hope that he continues his persistent work also during the approaching next decade in the new conditions with a growing number of bioimpedance publications worldwide. However, every success creates new problems, some of which are discussed below.

Open access

Nanda V. Ranade and Damayanti C. Gharpure

Abstract

Image reconstruction in EIT is an inverse problem, which is ill posed and hence needs regularization. Regularization brings stability to reconstructed EIT image with respect to noise in the measured data. But this is at the cost of smoothening of sharp edges and high curvature details of shapes in the image, affecting the quality. We propose a novel iterative regularization method based on detection of probable location of the inclusion, for locally relaxing the regularization by appropriate amount, to overcome this problem. Local relaxation around inclusion allows reconstruction of its high curvature shape details or sharp features at the same time giving benefits of higher regularization in remaining areas of the image. The proposed method called DeTER is implemented using a small plug-in to EIDORS (Electrical Impedance and Diffused Optical Reconstruction Software) in a MATLAB environment. Parameters like CNR, correlation coefficients of shape descriptor functions and relative size of reconstructed targets have been computed to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique. The performance of DeTER is tested and verified on simulated data added with Gaussian noise for inclusions of different shapes. Both conducting and nonconducting inclusions are considered. The method is validated using open EIT data shared by ‘Finnish inverse problem society’ and also by reconstructing image of internal void of a papaya fruit from the data acquired by an EIT system developed in our laboratory. The reconstructed images corresponding to the open EIT data clearly show the shapes similar to original objects, with sharp edges and curvature details. The shapes obtained in the papaya image are shown to correspond to the actual void using shape descriptor function. The results demonstrate that the proposed method enhances the sharp features in the reconstructed image with few iterations without causing geometric distortions like smoothening or rounding of the edges.

Open access

B. Tsai, H. Xue, E. Birgersson, S. Ollmar and U. Birgersson

Abstract

We determine the in-vivo dielectric properties—resistivity and relative permittivity—of living epidermis and dermis of human skin soaked with a physiological saline solution for one minute between 1 kHz and 1 MHz. This is done by fitting approximate analytical solutions of a mechanistic model for the transport of charges in these layers to a training set comprising impedance measurements at two depth settings on stripped skin on the volar forearm of 24 young subjects. Here, the depth settings are obtained by varying the voltage at a second inject on the electrical-impedance-spectroscopy probe. The model and the dielectric properties are validated with a test set for a third depth setting with overall good agreement. In addition, the means and standard deviations of the thicknesses of living epidermis and dermis are estimated from a literature review as 61±7 μm and 1.0±0.2 mm respectively. Furthermore, extensions to resolve the skin layers in more detail are suggested.

Open access

Muhammad Abdul Kadir and K. Siddique-e Rabbani

Abstract

Tetra-polar electrical impedance measurement (TPIM) with a square geometry of electrodes is useful in the characterization of epithelial tissues, especially in the detection of cervical cancer at precancerous stages. However, in TPIM, the peak planar sensitivity just below the electrode surface is almost zero and increases to a peak value at a depth of about one third to one half of the electrode separation. To get high sensitivity for the epithelial layer, having thicknesses of 200 μm to 300 μm, the electrode separation needed is less than 1 mm, which is difficult to achieve in practical probes. This work proposes a conical conducting layer in front of a pencil like probe with a square geometry of TPIM electrodes to create virtual electrodes with much smaller separation at the body surface, thus increasing the sensitivity of the epithelial tissues. To understand the improvements, if any, 3D sensitivity distribution and transfer impedance were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics software for a simplified body tissue model containing a 300 μm epithelial layer. It has been shown that fractional contribution of an epithelial layer can be increased several times placing a cylindrical conducting layer in between the tissue surface and the electrodes, which can further be enhanced using a conical conducting layer. The results presented in this paper can be used to choose an appropriate electrode separation, conducting layer height and cone parameters for enhanced sensitivity in the epithelial layer.

Open access

Jakob Orschulik, Diana Pokee, Tobias Menden, Steffen Leonhardt and Marian Walter

Abstract

Lung pathologies such as edema, atelectasis or pneumonia are potentially life threatening conditions. Especially in critically ill and mechanically ventilated patients, an early diagnosis and treatment is crucial to prevent an Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome [1]. Thus, continuous monitoring tool for the lung condition available at the bedside would be highly appreciated. One concept for this is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). In EIT, an electrode belt of typically 16 or 32 electrodes is attached at the body surface and multiple impedance measurements are performed. From this, the conductivity change inside the body is reconstructed in a two-dimensional image. In various studies, EIT proved to be a useful tool for quantifying recruitment maneuvers, the assessment of the ventilation homogeneity, the detection of lung edema or perfusion monitoring [2, 3, 4, 5]. Nevertheless, the main problem of EIT is the low spatial resolution (compared to CT) and the limitation to two dimensional images. In this paper, we try to address the latter issue: Instead of projecting conductivity changes onto a two-dimensional image, we adjust electrode positions to focus single tetrapolar measurements to specific, three-dimensional regions of interest. In earlier work, we defined guidelines to achieve this focusing [6, 7]. In this paper, we demonstrate in simulations and in a water tank experiment that applying these guidelines can help to detect pathologies in specific lung regions.

Open access

Robert F. Melendy

Abstract

In a succession of articles published over 65 years ago, Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin and Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley established what now forms our physical understanding of excitation in nerve, and how the axon conducts the action potential. They uniquely quantified the movement of ions in the nerve cell during the action potential, and demonstrated that the action potential is the result of a depolarizing event across the cell membrane. They confirmed that a complete depolarization event is followed by an abrupt increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon, accompanied by considerable increases in membrane conductance. In an elegant theoretical framework, they rigorously described fundamental properties of the Na+ and K+ conductances intrinsic to the action potential.

Notwithstanding the elegance of Hodgkin and Huxley’s incisive and explicative series of discoveries, their model is mathematically complex, relies on no small number of stochastic factors, and has no analytical solution. Solving for the membrane action potential and the ionic currents requires integrations approximated using numerical methods. In this article I present an analytical formalism of the nerve action potential, Vm and that of the accompanying cell membrane electric field, Em. To conclude, I present a novel description of Vm in terms of a single, nonlinear differential equation. This is an original stand-alone article: the major contribution is the latter, and how this description coincides with the cell membrane electric field. This work has necessitated unifying information from two preceding papers [1,2], each being concerned with the development of closed-form descriptions of the nerve action potential, Vm.

Open access

Oliver Pabst

Abstract

It has been demonstrated before that human skin can be modeled as a memristor (memory resistor). Here we realize a memristor bridge by applying two voltages of opposite signs at two different skin sites. By this setup it is possible to use human skin as a frequency doubler and half-wave rectifier which is an application of the non-linear electrical properties of human skin. The corresponding electrical measurements are non-linear since these are affected by the applied stimulus itself.

Open access

Jaan Ojarand and Mart Min

Abstract

Different excitation signals are applicable in the wideband impedance spectroscopy in general. However, in electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements, there are limitations that set specific demands on the properties of the excitation signals. This paper compares the efficiency of different excitation signals in a graspable presentation and gives recommendations for their use. More exactly, the paper deals with finding the efficient excitation waveforms for the fast spectroscopy of electrical bioimpedance. Nevertheless, the described solutions could be useful also in other implementations of impedance spectroscopy intended for frequency domain characterization of different objects.

Open access

Fred J. Pettersen

Abstract

The term sensitivity is sometimes misused when discussing volume impedance measurements. This is a critique of the name of the quantity sensitivity, as well as pointing out how the term easily can be misinterpreted. To resolve the issue, a shift of focus towards volume impedance density, which is a more useful quantity, is proposed. A new parameter, perceptivity, is introduced. Perceptivity is useful tool for characterization of measurement systems, to objectively compare systems, and to formulate instrument specifications.