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Ileana Simona Dabu

Abstract

The Banat area is considered an area of interculturality and multilingualism, an area where there is an interference of cultures, a continuous dialogue between cultures and spiritualties. Banat, being a multicultural and multiethnic space, is a model of harmonious coexistence between the many ethnic groups that make it up. In the present research we have aimed at identifying the individual values of the inhabitants of the studied communities and the attitudes towards the others (Romanians, Serbs, Hungarians, Germans, Bulgarians and other ethnic groups), and also their attitudes towards work, land, church, trust in state institutions and traditional occupations.

Open access

Mathew O. Olasupo, Erhabor S. Idemudia, Ganiyat S. Arowosegbe and Damilare A. Fagbenro

Abstract

The study investigated the predictive role of pay satisfaction and organisational politics on quality of work life. Herzberg’s Two-Factor Theory was used as a theoretical framework in this study. Cross sectional survey research design was adopted. Data were collected from 429 respondents consisting of (Females = 231(53.8%), Males = 198(46.2%) (Mean age = 39.14, S.D = 12.07) via a simple random and convenience sampling techniques. Work-Related Quality of life scale (WRQLS), Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) and Perceived Organisational Politics Scale (POPS) were used as instrument for data collection. Data collected were analysed using Pearson moment correlation (PPMC) and Multiple Regression analysis. There was significant positive relationship between pay satisfaction and quality of work life. Positive relationship was found between organisational politics and the quality of work life. Finally, pay satisfaction and organisational politics jointly predict quality of work life. These findings have implications for putting up psychological interventions aim at improving the quality of work life of government employees.

Open access

Benjamin A. Ubleble, John M. Agomoh and Anthony Chovwen

Abstract

The Niger Delta of Nigeria rich in oil and gas resources has been plagued with series of armed conflicts characterised by massive youth restiveness. The peaceful coexistence of people in the region is often affected by the nature of oil and gas business determined by the political economy of the Nigerian state. By the statute of the Federal system of Government in Nigeria, all resources within the territorial boundary of the country belong to the Federal Government. The Government then pays a certain 13% derivation fund to the resource bearing states for development. The Federal Government equally sees to the development of the region through its statutory Agencies such as the Niger Delta Development Commission. All these efforts are yet to bring about infrastructural development and human capacity needs of the region. A consequence of this is the armed militancy and cult related violence that has engulfed the region. In this paper, an attempt is made to analyse the socioeconomic requisitions of a reintegration programme for ex-offenders seeking re-entry into mainstream society. An interventionist approach is recommended with effective monitoring and evaluation system for a socioeconomic reintegration of ex-offenders in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

Open access

Tărăbîc Andrei Alexandru

Abstract

Even though in many cases the terms of risk and uncertainty are similar, they have to be delimited to understand the meaning of each, individual, as accurately as possible. The two terms are combined in different situations. No matter how well the risk is managed, uncertainty cannot be removed because all possible situations and interdependencies cannot be taken into account. Thus, a source of risk can be considered uncertainty in itself if it is based on poor quality information about the actual internal or external situation of the company. Also, in my conclusion, traditional financial theory distinguishes between systematic risk and particular risk, which reaches the company’s overall risk. Investors can reduce total risk with the two primary risk management instruments, namely diversification and asset allocation.

Open access

Eleni Filippidou, Maria Koutsouba, Vassiliki Lalioti and Vassilis Lantzos

Abstract

The research field of this paper is the area of Thrace, a large geopolitical-cultural unit that was divided – due to political reasons – in three subareas distributed among three different countries: Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. A dance event that used to take place before the border demarcation but is still performed in the Greek and Turkish Thrace is that of “K’na”, a wedding dance event danced by the people of both border areas, despite of the changes in their magical-religious beliefs and the changes brought by socio-economic and cultural development. In particular, the aim of this paper is the study of the “construction” of the national identity of inhabitants both of Greek and Turkish Thrace, as this is manifested through the dance practice within the wedding event of “K’na”, through the lens of sociocybernetics. Data was gathered through ethnographic method as this is applied to the study of dance, while its interpretation was based on sociocybernetics according to Burke’s identity control theory. From the data analysis, it is showed that the “K’na” dance in Greek and Turkish Thrace constructs and reconstructs the national identity of the people who use them as a response to the messages they receive via the communication with “the national others”. In conclusion, the “construction” of the identity results from a continuous procedure of self-regulation and self-control through a cybernetic sequence of steps.

Open access

Tony Milligan

Abstract

Novels and thought experiments can be pathways to different kinds of knowledge. We may, however, be hard pressed to say exactly what can be learned from novels but not from thought experiments. Headway on this matter can be made by spelling out their respective conditions for epistemic failure. Thought experiments fail in their epistemic role when they neither yield propositional knowledge nor contribute to an argument. They are largely in the business of ‘knowing that’. Novels, on the other hand can be an epistemic success by yielding ‘knowledge how’. They can help us to improve our competences.

Open access

Basil Lourié

Abstract

Theodore the Studite resolved the logical problem posed by the second Iconoclasm in an explicitly paraconsistent way, when he applied to Jesus the definition of the human hypostasis while stating that there is no human hypostasis in Jesus. Methodologically he was following, albeit without knowing, Eulogius of Alexandria. He, in turn, was apparently followed by Photius, but in a confused manner.

Open access

Margaret Boone Rappaport and Christopher Corbally

Abstract

The authors present an evolutionary model for the biological emergence of religious capacity as an advanced neurocognitive trait. Using their model for the stages leading to the evolutionary emergence of religious capacity in Homo sapiens, they analyze the mechanisms that can fail, leading to unbelief (atheism or agnosticism). The analysis identifies some, but not all types of atheists and agnostics, so they turn their question around and, using the same evolutionary model, ask what keeps religion going. Why does its development not fail in one social group after another, worldwide? Their final analysis searches for reasons in important evolutionary changes in the senses of hearing, vision, and general sensitivity on the hominin line, which together interact with both intellectual and emotional brain networks to achieve, often in human groups, variously altered states of consciousness, especially a numinous state enabled in part by a brain organ, the precuneus. An inability to experience the numinous, consider it important, or believe in its supernatural nature, may cleave the human population into those with belief and those with unbelief.

Open access

Lluis Oviedo

Abstract

Free will is a very hot issue in several theoretical settings, but less in theology, or at least not as much as use to be in former times, when the discussions on sinfulness, grace and freedom were igniting a long season of controversies, especially in the Reformation time. Even in ecumenical dialogue apparently free will does not play a great role, since the reached consensus seems quite peaceful and agreement dominates over discussion. However, some theological insights, especially Karl Rahner reflections, are still worthy to consider and possibly theological anthropology should pay more attention to the current debate and its consequences for the way we understand human nature and its relationship with God.