Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 220 items for :

  • Social Anthropology x
Clear All
Open access

Katherine Kirk and Ellen Bal

Abstract

This paper explores the relationship between migration and integration policies in the Netherlands, diaspora policies in India, and the transnational practices of Indian highly skilled migrants to the Netherlands. We employ anthropological transnational migration theories (e.g., Ong 1999; Levitt and Jaworsky 2007) to frame the dynamic interaction between a sending and a receiving country on the lives of migrants. This paper makes a unique contribution to migration literature by exploring the policies of both sending and receiving country in relation to ethnographic data on migrants. The international battle for brains has motivated states like the Netherlands and India to design flexible migration and citizenship policies for socially and economically desirable migrants. Flexible citizenship policies in the Netherlands are primarily concerned with individual and corporate rights and privileges, whereas Indian diaspora policies have been established around the premise of national identity.

Open access

Marian Gajdoš and Stanislav Konečný

Abstract

The authors present the formation and development of the Ukrainian national education system in Slovakia after the World War II, which was determined by its results and new political conditions. The founding of Russian schools in Eastern Slovakia did not correspond to the wishes of part of the Ruthenian population, and their preference was a source of permanent tension. The authors of this article analyse the personnel, material and technical problems related to the development of Ukrainian (Russian) schools as well as the activities of political and state authorities in their solution. The introduction of the Ukrainian language as the language of instruction disrupted the consolidation in this area and increased dissatisfaction in many municipalities. The efforts to persuade people or various administrative obstacles could not prevent the change of the language of instruction from Ukrainian to Slovak.

Open access

Adam Wiesner

Abstract

The paper presents data from interviews conducted in 2006–2007 with four representatives of the Prague street art and graffiti scene who worked in the Czech capital city at the beginning of the 2000s. Part of the article deals with creative activities in the Prague subway where most of the interviewed authors created their works. The author thus offers the perspective of the authors of the Prague street art and graffiti scenes and presents their view of the (il)legal works of art from around ten years ago in the context of the current discourse in social sciences. Over the last twenty years, this discourse has evolved to such an extent that it now enables to see the phenomenon of urban public works of art as a phenomenon full of paradoxes. Graffiti and street art therefore cannot be interpreted only from the point of view of legality or the art of resistance. Their definition must remain sufficiently open, since certain ambivalence, contradiction and ghostliness are characteristic of it equally as of life in a modern global city that is inherently tied to it.

Open access

Blanka Soukupová

Abstract

The Czechoslovak Republic was created as the national state of the Czechs and Slovaks. Although it was based on the ethnic principle, the new state simultaneously assured relatively extensive rights for its national and religious minorities; in the Czech lands primarily for Czech Germans and the structured Jewish minority (in the new state, Jews could claim Jewish nationality and religion, or only Jewish religion). Although the Jewish minority was ideologically and politically heterogeneous and absolutely loyal to the state, it repeatedly became, not for the first time historically, the target of largely socially and ethnically motivated attacks after the foundation of the Republic. However, their nature was escalated even more by the difficult social conditions following World War I and the generally traumatic experience of the unexpected world war. Contemporary journalism helped disseminate the image of Jews as the main culprits who had caused the world war and were responsible for the general post-war destabilisation and shortages, Jews as non-state building residents of the republic, disloyal, pro-German orientated asocial elements, intensified by the image of Jewish refugees from Galicia and Bukovina, justly or unjustly accused of operating chain businesses. Contemporary journalism also emphasised the traditional image of Czech Germans as the ancient enemy of the Czech nation, currently accused of starting World War I. The fact that most Czech Germans were truly disloyal citizens of the new state after the foundation of the republic (and again in the 1930s) was balanced by the efforts of the Czechoslovak government to “win the Germans over for the new state” and therefore controlled the suppression of anti-German sentiments which were often linked to anti-Jewish sentiments. The text questions the significance of the image of the national enemy at a time in history that saw the destabilisation of existing socio-political relations, undoubtedly represented by the dissolution of the monarchy and the rise of new national states in Central Europe and their contemporary visualisation.

Open access

Katarína Koštialová, Grigorij Mesežnikov, Ivica Štelmachovič Bumová, František Bahenský, Veronika Beranská and Mikuláš Mušinka

Open access

Peter Bučka

Abstract

In this article, the author deals with the foundation, development, results and reasons of disappearance of the most successful sports club in the interwar era; the Jewish swimming and sports club Bar Kochba Bratislava. After the birth of Czechoslovakia, sports in Slovakia could develop on a national basis. Large national minorities had the same possibilities. To eliminate the risk of misusing sports for political purposes, sport representatives decided to organise it on the ethnic principle instead of the regional one. Thanks to this a wide variety of national sports organisations were established, including some Jewish ones. Even though Jews constituted only 2.01% of the population in the interwar period in today’s territory of Slovakia (Bergerová, 1992: 108), they succeeded not only in sports but in other areas of social life as well.

Open access

Jana Piroščáková

Abstract

The article presents the Codices of Revúca as one of the most important sources of research on Slovak fairy tales through the interpretation of the Berona fairy tale. This topic as a whole but also in the context of the fairy tale theory is still unexplored, just like most similar manuscripts of Slovak romanticists who were at the birth of the folklore studies in their pre-scientific period. It is purposly conceived as a material study with the aim of demonstrating the need to return to archive sources and the research potential offered by such materials. It is, however, not the specific objective of this article to present an analysis of the texts quoted in the annex. The article consists of two parts. The first one evaluates the existing material base of the research on the Codices of Revúca (J. Polívka, M. Dzubáková), highlights the limitations arising from the marginalisation of the available materials, offers precise records from the Codices of Revúca on the texts for the interpretation of the fairy tale and, finally, corrects the information on one of the key texts from this source, the letter written by S. Reuss on December 17, 1843, the full translation of which forms part of the text in the annex. The second (analytical) part of the article deals with the contextualisation and comparison of three commentaries on the Berona fairy tale (S. Reuss, J. Francisci, S. Ormis). All three texts are fully available in the annex.

Open access

Daniella Trimboli

Abstract

The contemporary diasporic experience is fragmented and contradictory, and the notion of ‘home’ increasingly blurry. In response to these moving circumstances, many diaspora and multiculturalism studies’ scholars have turned to the everyday, focussing on the local particularities of the diasporic experience. Using the Italo-Australian digital storytelling collection Racconti: La Voce del Popolo, this paper argues that, while crucial, the everyday experience of diaspora always needs to be read in relation to broader, dislocated contexts. Indeed, to draw on Grant Farred (2009), the experience of diaspora must be read both in relation to—but always ‘out of’—context. Reading diaspora in this way helps reveal aspects of diasporic life that have the potential to productively disrupt dominant assimilationist discourses of multiculturalism that continue to dominate. This kind of re-reading is pertinent in colonial nations like Australia, whose multiculturalism rhetoric continues to echo normative whiteness.

Open access

Helen Kim

Abstract

Germany is considered a relatively recent country where multiraciality has become a recognised phenomenon. Yet, Germany still considers itself a monoracial state, one where whiteness is conflated with “Germanness”. Based on interviews with seven people who are multiracial (mostly Korean–German) in Berlin, this article explores how the participants construct their multiracial identities. My findings show that participants strategically locate their identity as diasporic to circumvent racial “othering”. They utilise diasporic resources or the “raw materials” of diasporic consciousness in order to construct their multiracial identities and challenge racism and the expectations of racial and ethnic authenticity. I explored how multiracial experiences offer a different way of thinking about the actual doing and performing of diaspora.