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Nick Bailey, Joanna L. Stewart and Jon Minton

Abstract

The suburbanisation of poverty has been noted in the cities of a large number of countries, including the UK. The main drivers are labour market restructuring on the one hand, and market-driven change in the housing system on the other although social and housing policies are also factors. This paper explores the possible consequences for the welfare of low-income groups in relation to two dimensions: exposure to air pollution and access to good quality schools. Results show that, for these groups, suburbanisation has had mixed impacts on welfare. In most cities, suburbanisation is likely to bring improvements in air quality but there are only a minority where it improves access to good quality schools. Overall, it is clear that suburbanising low income households enjoy fewer of the benefits of suburban locations than middle class households.

Open access

Loretta Lees

Abstract

Gentrification is no-longer, if it ever was, a small scale process of urban transformation. Gentrification globally is more often practised as large scale urban redevelopment. It is state-led or state-induced. The results are clear – the displacement and disenfranchisement of low income groups in favour of wealthier in-movers. So, why has gentrification come to dominate policy making worldwide and what can be done about it?

Open access

Benjamin Stelzle and Jörg Rainer Noennig

Abstract

A comprehensive piece of research on the tools and methods available for public participation in urban development was carried out as part of the U_CODE Urban Collective Design Environment H2020-ICT Project, the results of which are presented in this paper. Approximately 70 methods and a range of participation goals were identified by investigating the publications of 20 cities and participation networks in Germany plus a number of online participation platforms. In the descriptions a general distinction was made between the level of involvement and the objective of participation. For most of the goals on informational or cooperation level, several (especially offline) tools were found to be available. For more ambitious objectives, e.g. massive co-design, no appropriate tools are currently market-ready, yet several research and development projects are targeting the development and testing of such means. The strong development of more complex methods and tools can be expected within the next few years. Often these instruments are designed in cooperation with urban authorities, however their broad application in German municipalities may take a couple of years yet.

Open access

Elżbieta D. Ryńska and Maria L. Lewicka

Abstract

Sustainable development has now become an element that is deeply integrated in contemporary architectonic design and urban planning. With the development of a modern designer’s workshop, resilience, passive, ecological, plus energy or nZEB buildings and various smart city issues have to be included in line with more conventional analyses prepared during the design processes. Currently, we also face the emerging theme of the circular economy. This has a great impact, not just on the introduction of circular loops into the flow of building materials, but also on the design approach and management choices. Historic heritage buildings forming part of the building stock must be considered within this new theme. Most existing research deals either with new or modernised buildings, or with the re-use flows of various materials, actually often coming from historic buildings which have passed beyond the limits of repair. This paper shows a different approach to historic buildings where a design was prepared focusing on best choice cases and included a chain of several intertwining approaches, presented against the background of a Polish case study in Warsaw. The aim of this work is to propose a design management procedure to be used when dealing with historic buildings. It follows both the path of a circular economy and of heritage values, emphasising the need to maintain as much of the existing fabric as possible. This analysis is also based on various issues of site research and is followed by historic building case analysis.

Open access

Anna Mastalerz

Abstract

This paper deals with the transformations of (post)industrial towns in Poland, which took place during the transition from a centralised communist economy to liberal capitalism. As a consequence, a number of areas became redundant. These malfunctioning spaces represent serious spatial, social and economic problems. The complex multifaceted nature of towns means, however, that there were no simple solutions leading to immediate improvements. Investments focused on particular, isolated areas appeared to be far from sufficient interventions. Therefore, comprehensive programmes aimed at holistic urban regeneration are more common nowadays. Since local community wellbeing is one of the key factors in these renewal schemes, social participation is a crucial part of the process. This allows residents to have an influence on the regeneration of their town, which (if well carried out) is expected to improve space, economy and quality of life. The above-mentioned issues will be analysed on the basis of a case study of Pabianice, a post-industrial town in the province of Lodz. The aim of this study is to examine the social participation initiatives implemented during the preparation of the Regeneration Programme for Pabianice – to classify them and to compare them with models regarding the level of social involvement and power in the urban regeneration process described in the paper.

Open access

Anna Staniewska

Abstract

Securing green infrastructure is crucial to maintaining the quality of life in cities therefore it is necessary to create new public green spaces responding to the needs of city dwellers. This paper provides a qualitative evaluation of the results of teaching the process of public participation to landscape architecture students from Politechnika Krakowska including such activities both preceding and during their work on the design of public parks. In this paper the author describes the rationale behind introducing participative planning into academic education and its theoretical background, as well as comparing the local perspective with examples of successful participative projects in the broader European context and the context of international trends in landscape architecture and urban planning in general. Both the teaching methodology and participation tools used are presented, referring to the methods already in use in practice and highlighting the fact that the teaching goes far beyond the legal minimum foreseen in Polish legislation. Finally, based on a summary of their experiences and case studies, particular fields of impact observed in the practical implementation of their projects are identified. Taking all this into consideration, it may be stated that from the moment when landscape architecture graduates started working for the public authorities in Kraków and making use of their knowledge and skills in public participation, the quality of public involvement has risen and the number of parks realised via this process is growing.

Open access

Stefania Środa-Murawska, Leszek S. Dąbrowski and Paweł Smoliński

Abstract

Social participation allows public authorities to learn about communities’ views and thus to jointly work out satisfying solutions. The pre-1989 law in Poland generally prevented the possibility of citizens taking part in the making of decisions about the use of public areas. Over the following years participatory decision-making was adopted, which evolved and expanded as new tools were introduced which encourage citizen involvement. The municipality of Toruń adopted a participatory approach to budgeting in 2014 so that the city’s residents could influence the use of public land in their neighbourhoods according to their needs. The total amount of funding spent on participatory budgets between 2014 and 2017 exceeded PLN 26 million. The aim of the study is to prepare a typology of desired changes in the city of Toruń and to identify the level of social participation on the basis of projects nominated for financing from the participatory budget. To this end, the types of projects and the turnout of the residents who voted were analysed by place of residence. The study showed that both the number of nominated projects and the number of voters increased in the years covered by the survey, thus pointing to the success of participatory budgeting, a form of schooling in local democracy, in Toruń.

Open access

Natalia Bursiewicz

Abstract

In Poland, the last 15 years have been marked by various, numerous regeneration projects of historic cities that were supposed to improve the citizens quality of life and their security, as well as to create an attractive tourist offer. Those programs were often focused on the renewal, reshape and modernization of public squares. Such changes never go unnoticed. On contrary, these are frequently associated with criticism, debate and disagreements. The research has been focused on the analysis of regeneration projects from selected Market Squares in historic cities and town centres in Lower Silesia. The main aim was to exhibit the medieval origin of those squares and recently introduced contemporary layout. Moreover it was to present diverse opinions regarding square’s form and function, that can be crucial in understanding the architects, planners and citizens’ points of view and their ‘feelings’ towards the space.

Open access

Krystyna Ilmurzyńska

Abstract

This article investigates the suitability of traditional and participatory planning approaches in managing the process of spatial development of existing housing estates, based on the case study of Warsaw’s Ursynów Północny district. The basic assumption of the article is that due to lack of government schemes targeted at the restructuring of large housing estates, it is the business environment that drives spatial transformations and through that shapes the development of participation. Consequently the article focuses on the reciprocal relationships between spatial transformations and participatory practices. Analysis of Ursynów Północny against the background of other estates indicates that it presents more endangered qualities than issues to be tackled. Therefore the article focuses on the potential of the housing estate and good practices which can be tracked throughout its lifetime. The paper focuses furthermore on real-life processes, addressing the issue of privatisation, development pressure, formal planning procedures and participatory budgeting. In the conclusion it attempts to interpret the existing spatial structure of the estate as a potential framework for a participatory approach.

Open access

Krystyna Pawłowska

Abstract

The idea of public participation in spatial management finds an ever-expanding number of supporters and implementers in Poland. An increasing number of references to the subject are incorporated in Polish acts of law and other legal regulations. Despite progress in the field, the status quo cannot be considered satisfactory. Acceptance an idea does not always go hand in hand with skill in applying it. The reason for the many failures and misunderstandings are the defects and errors in the methods of its application as well as false representations concerning the whole idea and its constituent parts. Far from being clear, at face value cases of participation occurring in this context may meet the requirements and yet bring none of the expected benefits. A caricature of participation, they discourage further attempts. This article presents a list of defects, shortcomings, flaws, errors, and myths that make the implementation of participatory projects difficult, if not impossible.