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Sean Murphy

Abstract

The language of Early Modern texts can potentially reveal a lot about Shakespeare’s language. In this paper I describe the creation of a genre classification scheme for a segment of Early English Books Online – Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP), covering the period 1560–1640. This categorisation permits meaningful comparison of the language of Shakespeare with that of his contemporaries and makes an integral contribution to The Encyclopaedia of Shakespeare’s Language project at Lancaster University. I outline the rationale behind the scheme, describe preliminary automatic genre classification work and present the prototype approach adopted for this categorisation. I also provide specific examples of classification in practice and discuss internal and external factors which influenced genre selection. I finish by suggesting how a range of scholars might benefit from this research.

Open access

Tamás Fekete and Ádám Porkoláb

Abstract

In this article we would like to examine an area of onomastics that has not received much scholarly attention. We aim to provide an adequate linguistic analysis of the place-names found in The Elder Scrolls (ES) video game series. For our analysis, we rely chiefly on the methods of linguistic statistics, which have not yet gained widespread use in onomastic research. Our goal is to give a boost to linguistic and onomastic research into video games and to develop related aspects of its research methodology. Two main methods of place-name formation can be observed in our results: one is when the fictional names are coined on the basis of the lexical elements of already existing non-fictional languages (we call these mimetic names), and the other is when the game developers create so-called speaking names. In our article we demonstrate that the toponyms of the ES universe in part conform to the conventions of non-fictional place-name formation (e.g. they can be sorted into the two main categories of habitative names and topographical names), and in part they contradict such conventions, because around 14 percent of the names we analyzed are purposefully coined as semantically obscure toponyms, which does not happen in the case of non-fictional names.

Open access

Peter Petré, Lynn Anthonissen, Sara Budts, Enrique Manjavacas, Emma-Louise Silva, William Standing and Odile A.O. Strik

Abstract

The present article provides a detailed description of the corpus of Early Modern Multiloquent Authors (EMMA), as well as two small case studies that illustrate its benefits. As a large-scale specialized corpus, EMMA tries to strike the right balance between big data and sociolinguistic coverage. It comprises the writings of 50 carefully selected authors across five generations, mostly taken from the 17th-century London society. EMMA enables the study of language as both a social and cognitive phenomenon and allows us to explore the interaction between the individual and aggregate levels.

The first part of the article is a detailed description of EMMA’s first release as well as the sociolinguistic and methodological principles that underlie its design and compilation. We cover the conceptual decisions and practical implementations at various stages of the compilation process: from text-markup, encoding and data preprocessing to metadata enrichment and verification.

In the second part, we present two small case studies to illustrate how rich contextualization can guide the interpretation of quantitative corpus-linguistic findings. The first case study compares the past tense formation of strong verbs in writers without access to higher education to that of writers with an extensive training in Latin. The second case study relates s/th-variation in the language of a single writer, Margaret Cavendish, to major shifts in her personal life.

Open access

Sven Leuckert

Open access

Peter Collins and Xinyue Yao

Abstract

This paper presents a newly-compiled diachronic corpus of Australian English (AusBrown). With four sampling time points (1931, 1961, 1991 and 2006), Aus-Brown is designed to match the current suite of British and American ‘Brown-family’ corpora in both sampling year and design. We provide details of the composition and compilation of AusBrown, and explore the broader context of its ‘Brown-family background’ and of complementary Australian corpora. We also overview research based on the Australian corpora presented, including several AusBrown-based papers.

Open access

Gabriela Tucan

Abstract

This article dwells on three of Hemingway’s canonical short stories, set in Italy. While not entirely autobiographical, they deal with Hemingway’s inner turmoil caused by his experience during World War I. From its inarticulate nature, pain half emerges into conversations between patients and physicians in A Very Short Story and In Another Country, but disappears into silence in A Way You’ll Never Be. The paper argues that the nature of physical and mental wounds, whether visible or concealed, fails objectification.

Open access

Diana Oțăt

Abstract

Although there has been harmonisation work on translator training, different programmes still show a different focus. The current paper frames a training project aiming at developing Master’s students specialised translation competence while working with bilingual corpora and exploiting technology. Legal translation corpus design, analysis tools and false-friend management are addressed so as to provide further insights into such recurrent matters.

Open access

Ilda Kanani

Abstract

The present paper treats some of the challenges faced when interpreting very technical presentations, speeches and discussion panels on a very specific training on small boat operations organized by U.S Coast Guard and U.S Embassy in Vlora, Albania. It tries to investigate the interpretation problems which may arise during this kind of translation and the specific skills required by the interpreters to successfully accomplish this really demanding task. The case study method is based on the author’s experience as a consecutive interpreter (English into Albanian and vice-versa) in this training and it will provide specific interpretation challenges along with skills and strategies employed in each case.