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Canyons of Albania and geotourism development

Abstract

Canyons are among the most interesting geosites created by the erosive activity of the rivers, processes of weathering and erosion or tectonic activity and are distinguished for the aesthetic beauty of the shapes, the labyrinths of the valleys, the steepness of the slopes, the greatness of vertical walls, waterfalls, caves, etc., bearing high scientific, educational and touristic values. Albania has a considerable number of canyons due to the presence of a rich river network flowing through the variety of geological formations and tectonic faults. Outstanding are the wellformed canyons in limestone rocks with almost vertical walls such as Gradec canyon in Çorovoda, Lëngarica canyon in Përmet, Grunas canyon in Theth, etc. The only canyons which are formed on magmatic rocks are the canyons of Devoll. For their values, the most interesting canyons are included in the list of nature monuments as geomonuments. The most magnificent and frequented canyons for tourism in Albania are the Osum canyons, Gradec canyon, Lëngarica canyon and Nivica canyon. These distant impressing landforms, once forgotten and unexplored, are now attracting the attention of many tourists either for admiring their natural scenery, hiking and rafting or for curative tourism. However, despite their values the canyons are not enough known due to lack of information or poor promotion. Filling this gap has served this study where the geotouristic potential of the canyons is evaluated according to four criteria of Knapik.at.al such as accessibility, state of preservation, scientific value and education value (Solarska and Jary, 2010). The database of the canyons is organized in an inventory card which contains general and specific data of each geosite. The final product of this project will be a website that will inform the public and promote the values of the canyons of Albania.

Open access
Comparison of geotourism assessment models: and experiment in Bakony–Balaton UNSECO Global Geopark, Hungary

Abstract

Geological and scenic values of locations are the non-living curiosities that can be preserved and popularized a lot easier using the institutional background of geotourism, such as geoparks. UNESCO Global Geoparks Network is responsible for protecting and fostering natural, scenic and cultural values and especially geosites that are the exciting visible physical elements. Our goal was to quantify the geotourism potential around Csopak, a scenic village in the Balaton Uplands giving home for the headquarter of the Bakony-Balaton UNESCO Global Geopark. After designating 216 potential geosites using topographic and geological maps, we applied two assessment models: the Geosite Assessment Model (GAM) and the Modified Geosite Assessment Model (M-GAM). GAM has been applied with good results in Hungary on different areas, but M-GAM has not been used before. As M-GAM involves tourists into the process counting with their opinion, it may give a more realistic view of the geosites. The two methods produced different but comparable final values of geotourism potential counted from the Main Value and Additional Value scores. We discovered that the proportion of the difference of these values carries major information. The ratio of ΔAV/ΔMV used as linear functions and depicted on diagrams can derive which values are more important for the visitors. From this result we can draw conclusions about the future development trends: scientific or infrastructural values should be more effectively fostered. Using our results, geosites can be handled and developed as visitors expect it.

Open access
Increasing the attractiveness of the Zádielska dolina (“Zadiel Gorge“) in the area of modern climbing as a tourism development support tool

Abstract

The Zádielska dolina (“Zadiel Gorge“) belongs to the most beautiful and from a natural science perspective to the most interesting landscape formations of the Slovak Karst. The area represents the National Nature Reserve in the National Park and is part the European Network of Protected Areas NATURA 2000. The site is characterized by climbing activity. This article provides suggestions of attractiveness in the field of climbing that respect the development of tourism in accordance with nature and landscape conservation. The basis for the proposals were theoretical knowledge, thorough analysis of the area and own experience with the issue. Recommendations from other climbing places and identification of problems between climbing and nature, have been key for us in making appropriate proposals. The increasing interest in adventure tourism, including climbing, means a global trend in tourism and therefore it is necessary to pay close attention to this issue.

Open access
Notes on the impact of cycling infrastructure on tourist destination management

Abstract

There has been a large support given to building of cycling routes in Slovakia for last few years at all levels and many aspects. Not just legislative, strategic and technical point of view but also financial support is necessary to take in account. According to this big effort is necessary to be more focused on a question of evaluation of impacts on local communities. This article deals with analysis of cycling infrastructure impact on destination performance.

Open access
Revitalised geotourism mining heritage potentials in the Posavje Folds

Abstract

The territory of the Posavje Folds offers many geotourism potentials reflecting in particular in rich mining heritage. For a long time, local communities have considered them mainly in the context of local problems, but nowadays we may see individual examples of successful revitalization of cave chambers and mining structures. All that has given rise to fantastic stories about the mining wealth of the underground world and the mining heritage interpreted with modern approaches and new findings. In addition to managers and heritage owners, the revitalization process also includes scientists, artists, architects and educators who, each in their own way, contribute to a holistic perspective of the values of the past in light of contemporary understanding of this type of heritage. As a result, the territory has witnessed the revitalization of the medieval lead and silver mine Padež pri Laškem, the former Laško coal mine machine room, which was transformed into the Strojnica Gallery, and the polymineral mine Sitarjevec within the last five years. All mentioned examples are cases of abandoned mining activities with long-lasting mining tradition, which left an imprint in the area in terms of the diverse social structure of the population and in terms of town development, which also allows us to evaluate from a distance the contribution to the construction of the railway between Vienna and Trieste, which put these towns on the European map of centres of industrial significance in the mid-19th century. Trains that still connect the Austrian capital with the Adriatic coast may in future, in light of sustainable green tourism, attract curious guests to stop and linger a while, which is the ultimate goal of the attempts of local communities to revitalise mining heritage. Meanwhile, the goals set can only be realised with the help of new and attractive tourist products that reflect own creativity related with tradition ranging from design ideas, music events, art installations, popular science evenings; in short, with contents that are suited to visitors of all ages.

Open access
Geological Tourism Development In The Finnish-Russian Borderland: The Case Of The Cross-Border Geological Route “Mining Road”

Abstract

The Finnish-Russian borderland has a unique geological potential for geological tourism development. Creating new tourist attractions based on geoheritage, design and development of the cross-border tourist routes open new opportunities for tourism development on both sides of the border. The article presents the crossborder geological tourist route “Mining Road” as a tool of activation of tourist activity in the Finnish-Russian borderland. This article explores the practical aspects of the project "Mining Road" development for tourism industry. It is proven the significance of cross-border route "Mining road" for preservation, popularization and reproduction of the natural, cultural and historical potential of the borderland.

Open access
Geotourism and Mining Heritage: a Potential Gold Mine for Central Nigeria

Abstract

The potential for geotourism and mining heritage of some landscapes in parts of Kaduna, Plateau, Nasarawa and Kwara states in central Nigeria were studied and compiled. The result show that geological endowments range from insalbergs, flood basalts and dome structures, which presents natural landscape for tourism. The quartzite ridges of the Oreke area in Ilorin host the Owu Falls of 120m cascading waters, the Kafanchan flood basalts that flowed extensively from the Kagoro hills with extensive columnar jointing creating the prestigious water falls of over 30m all present versed potential for geotourism. Mining activity around the Jos Plateau (Bassa, Jos, Bukuru, Barakin Ladi and Bokkos areas), southern Kaduna (Godogodo and Jagindi) create landscapes that if properly beautified can become tourist landmarks. Adopting and harnessing these landscapes can boost and provide alternative revenue for the affected central.

Open access
Kaczawa Klippen Belt – geotouristic attraction in the Sudety Mountains, SW Poland

Abstract

In the paper authors present some geological sites from Kaczawa Unit, Sudetes, Poland, and their interpretation in a geotectonic context. All described geosites are important for understanding the evolution of so called Kaczawa Accretionary Prism as well as whole Sudetes. Presented outcrops are easily accessible, well exposed and exhibits high education value. Special attention was given to the Wojcieszów Limestones and their relationship to the surrounding rocks

Open access
Stone in architecture and sculpture – source material for reconstruction

Abstract

Stone is the oldest, natural material, which was (and still is) used as both building and sculptural material. The most commonly used for these purposes are: granites, marbles, limestones and sandstones, representing the three main genetic groups of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. All of them are permanently being destroyed in result as well of natural weathering as microbiological activity and anthropogenic pollution of atmosphere, known as deterioration. The speed of such decay depends on both environmental conditions and mineral composition of the stone and it can lead to such intensive destruction that conservation may require partial replacement. Smaller damages are refilled with appropriate mineral masses, whereas in case of bigger damages refilling with natural stone is necessary. Professional conservation practice demands the selection and use of the same rock or the rock that is, in so far as is possible, identical to that originally used. It can be done only after previous detailed petrographical studies of the original material. Only then the stone material used for reconstruction will be appropriate and stonework performed properly will not (or almost not) leave marks. In many cases the ancient quarries do not exist and original source material is not available. Then petrographical studies of numerous rock-samples, which are recently available from other existing and/or working quarries, will allow the indication the most similar material. In many cases, unfortunately, the stone used for replacement is not identical to the original but only macroscopically similar. In such a case results might be visible sooner or later. These will be differences in colour, differences in structure and in some cases even crystallization of secondary minerals in the newly inserted fragments.

Open access
Creating demand for the tourist product during the implementation of geotourist project for post-mining objects

Abstract

The experience of recent years shows that geotourism in post-mining objects has got a large development potential due to, among others, moving away from the typical museums to modern tourism products much more engaging visitors and the transition from the idea of 3S (sun, sand, sea) for 3E (experiment, excitement, education) and 4H (heritage, handicraft, habitat, history). In the article the specifics of the tourism product in projects related to the adaptation and using of post-mining objects and sites were presented. The article presents an assessment of the possibility of building a branded tourist product based on the relics of the mining industry in the context of the development and implementation of subsequent phases of the project consisting in making these relics available to tourists. The examples of completed projects, among others, in Poland and Germany were used. The division of the primary and secondary value of the geotourist project and the activities affecting the increase of these values were proposed. The article also raises issues of variation in demand for mining heritage products and the economic viability of such projects, as well as the recommendations for future investor in the post-mining tourism’ venture were specified.

Open access