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Alexandra Ioana Daniela Rus, Monica Violeta Achim and Sorin Nicolae Borlea

Abstract

The aim of this paper consists in providing a general overview of the notion of intellectual capital as a key to maximizing the corporate performance. Following the researches carried out, we present the delimitations of the intellectual capital in relation with human capital, relational capital and structural capital. In terms of its measurement, we focus on a question which could be a solid base for the next studies: “Can intellectual capital be evaluated?” In this regard, a number of methods (direct and methods based on assets returns), generic model and individual company models were presented, concluding in this way with a hierarchy in terms of utility and their importance.

Open access

Cristina-Veronica Partenie

Abstract

In the context of an increasing competition among Romanian universities for attracting students, developing a strong brand that appeals to the stakeholders’ needs and desires, while incorporating the institutions values and principles, is a desired course of action. A well-structured relatable brand enables future students to identify themselves with an institution and helps them in taking an important decision that could determine the outcome of their future. The present study analyses the factors that high school students consider when choosing to attend a certain university, through a quantitative research performed among 275 high school students from 33 high school institutions in Bucharest, Romania. Result helped classify the most important markers of a reputable university, which universities should consider when building branding programs. At the same time, universities’ communication strategies should appeal to values that they share with their targeted audiences in order to increase their attractiveness.

Open access

Mercy T. Musakwa and Nicholas M. Odhiambo

Abstract

This paper gives an overview of foreign direct investment (FDI) in South Africa from 1980 to 2017. It highlights trends in FDI inflows, reforms that have been implemented to date, and challenges that need to be addressed in order to increase the FDI inflows into the country. Government reforms on FDI have been two pronged. Firstly, there are policies that are aimed at creating a strong competitive industry and a strong industrial base for investment. Among such policies are trade liberalisation policies, multilateral and regional integration policies, supportive industrial policies, and bilateral trade agreements. Secondly, there are policies that directly target the FDI investment. These policies include, amongst others, investment incentives, regulatory reforms, exchange control relaxation, and Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) reforms. The findings from this study show that FDI inflows have increased significantly from 1990 although they still remain depressed.

Open access

Cordelia Onyinyechi Omodero

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of corruption on foreign direct investment inflows in Nigeria, by using some control variables. The study covers a period from 1996 to 2017 and employs Ordinary Least Squares method to perform the multiple regression analysis with the aid of SPSS version 20. The findings indicate that corruption has a significant positive influence on FDI. Though the influence of inflation is significantly negative but exchange rate and Nigeria’s corruption ranking position have insignificant positive impact on FDI. The implication is that the poor legal framework and institutional qualities in Nigeria are helping corruption to thrive in all areas of Nigeria’s economy and might ruin the young generation if nothing is done urgently. The study finds support for helping hand theory of corruption and FDI and also establishes that inflation has a significant negative influence on FDI inflows in the country. Therefore, the study recommends establishment of strong institutional and legal system to curtail the prevailing situation in order to save the future of the country.

Open access

Asif Ahmed Kibria, Kamrunnessa, Md. Mahmudur Rahman and Annanya Kar

Abstract

Banana plants (Musa paradaisica) and banana peels (Musa sapientum) two of same genus Musa are grown in worldwide and consumed as ripe fruit or used for culinary purpose. All parts of the banana plants have medicinal applications. The aim of the present study was detection of phytochemicals from this two types of samples and find out some viable phytochemicals which might be used as food additives after commercial purification. These two types of samples banana plants and banana peels were collected from local area of sobhanbagh near Daffodil International University. Samples were washed and dried in room temperature and grinded in pestle. Then 25 gm of grinded samples were soaked in 75 ml of 70% methanol, ethanol, acetone and 0.9% NaCl solution for 72 hours. Then all the extracts of banana peels and banana plants were detected by standard protocol. Flavonoids, carbohydrates, reducing sugar, tannins, saponins, anthraquinones, steroids, glycosides, phytosterols, phenols, terpenoids, were detected from those extracts. Negative and positive result of presence of phytochemicals were detected by the observing of color change. Banana peels and banana plant extracts were showed maximum result in ethanolic extracts. The present study showed qualitative analysis of phytochemicals content existence in banana peels and banana plants extracts. The study also discussed the application of some phytochemicals in food industry.

Open access

Abishkar Khatiwada, Aadesh Subedi and Rashmi Dangol

Abstract

The study mainly focuses on the status of production and marketing of large cardamom in Nepal and also compares these dimensions in the context of different countries. For the study mainly secondary data were collected from research articles, reports, publications and news articles. Large cardamom is the third most expensive crop and one of the major cash crops of Nepal. Nepal is the largest producer of large cardamom in the world followed by India and Bhutan. Taplejung, Sankhuwasabha, Panchthar and Illam are the four major districts that contribute more than 80% of the national production. Cardamom produced in Nepal is graded according to tail cutting after drying and packed in jute bag or plastic to export it to foreign countries. Nepal exports almost 90 percentage of its total cardamom production to India. In the global scenario, Guatemala is the largest exporter of cardamom (small and large combined) followed by India, Nepal, Singapore and Indonesia respectievly. It was found that the production of cardamom is declining in Nepal due to price fluctuation and viral diseases such as Chirkey, Furkey. Problem such as absence of unique HS code for large cardamom and ‘duplicate large cardamom’ are also seen in the market.

Open access

Fabian Buder, Anja Dieckmann, Holger Dietrich and Julia Wieting

Open access

Luka Neralić and Margareta Gardijan Kedžo

Abstract

After its introduction in 1978, Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) has instantly been recognized as a useful methodology for measuring the relative efficiency of different entities, called Decision Making Units (DMUs), given multiple criteria. Up until nowadays, the popularity of DEA has been growing and a significant number of bibliographical items was published, reporting on both theoretical and empirical results. However, the main applicative area of DEA remained the performance measurement in economics and business. On the 40th anniversary of DEA, the aim of this paper is to present the DEA bibliography of Croatian scientists (up until June 2018). We consider six main categories of DEA-related publications, followed with key statistics and an overview of keywords and research areas. The whole list of DEA-related publications used in this analysis is published online. We believe this research will shed light on the state of DEA in Croatian science and motivate future researches.

Open access

Craig Depken, Chanda Chiseni and Ernest Ita

Abstract

We utilize two waves of the National Income Dynamics Study in South Africa to estimate the returns to education in 2010 and 2012. We find that during this time period the returns to education were approximately 18% per year of education and that the returns were higher for females relative to males and higher for those living in urban relative to rural areas. The policy implications include a suggestion to continue investment in educational infrastructure, especially in rural areas, so as to increase the returns to education in those areas.