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Alexandra Ioana Daniela Rus, Monica Violeta Achim and Sorin Nicolae Borlea

Abstract

The aim of this paper consists in providing a general overview of the notion of intellectual capital as a key to maximizing the corporate performance. Following the researches carried out, we present the delimitations of the intellectual capital in relation with human capital, relational capital and structural capital. In terms of its measurement, we focus on a question which could be a solid base for the next studies: “Can intellectual capital be evaluated?” In this regard, a number of methods (direct and methods based on assets returns), generic model and individual company models were presented, concluding in this way with a hierarchy in terms of utility and their importance.

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Cristina-Veronica Partenie

Abstract

In the context of an increasing competition among Romanian universities for attracting students, developing a strong brand that appeals to the stakeholders’ needs and desires, while incorporating the institutions values and principles, is a desired course of action. A well-structured relatable brand enables future students to identify themselves with an institution and helps them in taking an important decision that could determine the outcome of their future. The present study analyses the factors that high school students consider when choosing to attend a certain university, through a quantitative research performed among 275 high school students from 33 high school institutions in Bucharest, Romania. Result helped classify the most important markers of a reputable university, which universities should consider when building branding programs. At the same time, universities’ communication strategies should appeal to values that they share with their targeted audiences in order to increase their attractiveness.

Open access

Mercy T. Musakwa and Nicholas M. Odhiambo

Abstract

This paper gives an overview of foreign direct investment (FDI) in South Africa from 1980 to 2017. It highlights trends in FDI inflows, reforms that have been implemented to date, and challenges that need to be addressed in order to increase the FDI inflows into the country. Government reforms on FDI have been two pronged. Firstly, there are policies that are aimed at creating a strong competitive industry and a strong industrial base for investment. Among such policies are trade liberalisation policies, multilateral and regional integration policies, supportive industrial policies, and bilateral trade agreements. Secondly, there are policies that directly target the FDI investment. These policies include, amongst others, investment incentives, regulatory reforms, exchange control relaxation, and Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) reforms. The findings from this study show that FDI inflows have increased significantly from 1990 although they still remain depressed.

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Cordelia Onyinyechi Omodero

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of corruption on foreign direct investment inflows in Nigeria, by using some control variables. The study covers a period from 1996 to 2017 and employs Ordinary Least Squares method to perform the multiple regression analysis with the aid of SPSS version 20. The findings indicate that corruption has a significant positive influence on FDI. Though the influence of inflation is significantly negative but exchange rate and Nigeria’s corruption ranking position have insignificant positive impact on FDI. The implication is that the poor legal framework and institutional qualities in Nigeria are helping corruption to thrive in all areas of Nigeria’s economy and might ruin the young generation if nothing is done urgently. The study finds support for helping hand theory of corruption and FDI and also establishes that inflation has a significant negative influence on FDI inflows in the country. Therefore, the study recommends establishment of strong institutional and legal system to curtail the prevailing situation in order to save the future of the country.

Open access

Muhammad-Bashir Owolabi Yusuf and Onikosi-Alliyu Saidat Oluwatoyin

Abstract

Malaysia ranks among the first twenty countries with the highest death rate from road accidents with death from motorcycle accidents accounting for more than sixty percent of this death rate. The Malaysian government, in the year 2010, started the enforcement of helmet (head protector) in an effort to reduce the rate of death from this source. This paper examines users‟ acceptance of helmet by motorcyclist, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). The data for this study comes from field survey of motorcyclists in Malaysia. This data was analysed using structural equation modelling. It was discovered that different factors from the theory account for user acceptance of this novelty. The paper concludes by specifying the policy implications of this and recommends other ways of improvement.

Open access

Miroslava Vlčková, Zuzana Frantíková and Jaroslav Vrchota

Abstract

In most European countries, teleworking or homeworking is used in various forms that differ from one another by its legal regulation. The paper examines the SME’s in the Czech Republic from the perspective what makes them to adopt telework using the financial indicators. We hypothesized that employer adoption of telework would depend on some economic factors. The empirical evidence showed that a typical company that uses telework is a company with higher ratio of liabilities and therefore lower ratio of equity, a lower ratio of fixed assets, higher sales, lower inventory, higher labour productivity and higher value added per employee, higher return on equity, higher personnel costs, higher average wages. Within the analysed enterprises, 16 indicators were assessed; the 9 indicators showed the difference between companies that use telework and companies that do not use telework. The research shows a typical company that uses telework.

Open access

Laura Bertalan, Renáta Inzsöl, Judit Hegedüs and Ferenc Jankó

Abstract

Direct sales by farmers gained acceptance in Hungary following the incursion of healthy eating and the enhancement of local economic development efforts. Conducting questionnaire surveys and interviews, our research investigated the means through which locally produced goods reach consumers, e.g., short food supply chains, as well as the farmers’ motivations and the necessary developments. According to the main results, personal direct consumer relations are vital for local farmers; however, advanced sales channels are not popular nor fully developed in Hungary. Only the capital city shows some development here, catalysing and stimulating the domestic market and consumer behaviour. On the other hand, the age structure of local farmers or the lack of knowledge hinder the advent of advanced sales channels. Nevertheless, there is a continuous and immanent need for development in this sector; although, the recent conditions of subsidies unfortunately do not support small scale local farmers.