Browse

1 - 10 of 159 items :

  • Drama, Theater x
Clear All

Abstract

Drama writings and theatre performances have always been, in my opinion, the mirror in which our society reflects itself. If in the decades before the 90s our society witnessed a total or quasi-total lack of freedom and a lack of voices to be heard in theatres, in the 90s we have all been witnesses to an absolute freedom that has been constantly managed chaotically. Immediately after The Revolution, the long lost freedom has soon become confusing and has turned into a heavy tormenting issue. The new drama writing and theatre performance have needed more than 10 years to change into something new. The independent theatres and the new drama have arisen as a reaction to the crisis that our theatres underwent in the 90s. The new artist of the new millennium is often self-taught, he has to improve his organizational abilities, to think big when it comes to new projects, to see the bigger picture and not to remain stranded into his own piece of art.

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract

With a selection of both themes and delicate topics of the present, the Myths Reinterpreted in Contemporary Francophone Dramatury Anthology brings together established voices and young spirits around texts focused on young audiences. Jean-Pierre Dopagne, Axel Cornil, Marine Bachelot Nguyen, Veronica Mabardi, Gustave Akakpo, Jean- François Guibault and Andreanne Joubert are the authors present between the covers of this mosaic, but harmonious volume. The great figures of the Greek tragedy are seen again by the dwarves on the shoulders of the giants, much like the present with which they come to overlap.

Abstract

In this article I would like to point out the importance of the functionality of the soundtrack in film and theatre. First of all, I can mention that the chosen thematic has an almost unexistent bibliography due to the decreased number of theoretical works in this domain, and the few existent studies handle the same thematic from different angles, causing a lack of balance in the processing of musical and technical context. In most cases the cultural audience doesn’t watch a movie or a theatrical play for its music, but is yet 50% influenced by it, noticing it only when the background music changes into an objectively or subjectively disturbing one. On the other hand, if a movie has an impecable soundtrack, the audience won’t be bothered by it. These informations lead to the conclusion that the soundtrack has a big influence on our subconscience, dominantly on the auditive and less on the visual one.

Abstract

Hamlet is the play that has ignited the most numerous polemics, and about the Prince of Denmark and his madness, may it be considered real or acted out, thousands of pages have been written. “Hamlet is the absolute character. No other author has ever managed to create something with such a spectacular status. He is an enigma, the only one that has never given anyone the chance to fully decipher it, not one from all the people that had ever come close to it.”1 Hamlet- the actor and the director, this is the perspective from which one will seek answers by following the text and certain unique directorial approaches. One analyzed the monologue from the second scene of the third act. In this “theatre lesson”, one can find guidelines on acting, but also on directing, pieces of advice that are valid today. Hamlet is one of the characters with the most monologues, pages and pages of words that cover the same dilemma – To be or not to be. One proposes to follow the acting lesson, but also the play-within-the-play scene, as they are connected from the actors’ and directors’ perspectives. The monologue presents strict guidelines for actors/directors, exemplifying them, and in the scene of the performance one can notice whether the “lesson” was truly efficient or not. One will follow this specific path in certain productions, considered as being unique.

Abstract

The theatre of Robert Pinget was acclaimed at the Avignon Festival till the 1980s, until it became in spite of itself a representative of the theatrical avant-garde greeted by numerous critics and academic texts. It appears, however, that Pinget’s theatre was the victim of a real misinterpretation. Adventurous life, where romance and destiny mingle, lay the foundations of pingétienne irony, this search for personal tone subjects to uncertainties and other contradictions Robert Pinget’s affiliation with Max Jacob’s is an attempt to approach the avant-garde, but to turn away from it in a subtle way in the last moment. This waltz-hesitation of Pinget will be the basis of a tendency to put this work in the “new novel” or the theatrical avant-garde. The literature of Pinget can be considered as a form of the art of the escape the expression of an incessantly renewed amazement through an acousmatic voice. It is through the theory of the double and the quest for secrecy that we can now reposition Pinget’s theater in the perspective of a classical theater on the very margins of the avant-garde and a striking example of an ontological incomprehension between adaptation and the message left by the author.

Abstract

Maurice Maeterlinck, the author of some of the plays associated with the symbolist aesthetic, in which the character is often an unseen presence associated to destiny or death, writes in the first part of his career a collection of dramas in which the heroines seem to appear each time under different guises. At the end of his career, Maeterlinck returns to the mysterious universe proposed in his first text – The Princess Maleine, finishing the circle of love dramas, the dramas of the profound self discovery. The princess Isabelle comes and claims the unfulfillment of her sisters from the previous texts, which she afterwards saves. The obsession of the water, a lethal substance for most of Maeterlinck’s heroines, becomes for Isabelle the unconscious need for purification. Being the last text published during this author’s life, it contains within its structure fragments from almost all his previous work, and thus there is a certain continuity and unity between the obscurity of this author’s beginnings and the light of revelation which precedes the great travel to the unknown.

Abstract

This paper intends to deal with the problem of transcending the limit from the performing arts perspective. To achieve this goal, we proceed to an analysis of the concept of limit from both philosophical and theatrical perspectives. There is a wide range of possible definitions of limit as the concept in itself turns out to be ambiguous. To reflect upon different ways of surpassing the limit firstly requires the identification and investigation of the meanings of the concept of limit which is to be surpassed. Some examples of going beyond the limit in the theatre are briefly reviewed.

Abstract

Two categories of limitations are identified in the performing arts: physical, on the one hand, and those related to the intellectual and emotional predispositions of artists, on the other. Physical boundaries, in turn, are divided into material barriers - for example, the type of performing space and its dimensions - and the constraints generated by the anatomy and morphology of each artist. The experience had at the Vasile Alecsandri National Theater, in Iaşi, is evoked, while insisting on the importance of the actors’ abilities to go through the different states of mind that accompany various ages of man. The discussion of limitations involves the discussion of the new. The contribution of new stage technologies to the evolution of theater is recorded. It is briefly described, in context, the experience facilitated by the show Planet of Lost Dreams, in order to advocate for the avoidance of the unwarranted use of means such as video projections, the Internet, etc. The challenges posed by the mix of 3D and 2D images are noted. The view is advanced that the total absence of limitations, as well as their formal treatment can block the development of the theater.

Abstract

This article proposes, explains and describes an original method called Queering Drama, which is the result of this article’s author one decade of research. Queering Drama is not just a theoretical work hypothesis, but also a practical performing method of going beyond limits by Queering the characters of any classic play (the Queering Drama method can be applied to modern plays as well, but the classic plays are the ones most staged, in greater need for new meanings and refashioning). What happened if one character from a classic play would not be put on stage and played as the dramatist dictates, from a sex and gender perspective? What if, instead of a heterosexual woman (labeled by the dramatist as the wife of..., the daughter of...), the character were played as a bisexual male, or a lesbian female, or a plurisexual hermaphrodite? How would that change the relations between the characters? Would it make a difference? Would such staging change the meanings of the play? Queering Drama involves rethinking and discovering new ways of reading old iconic plays, more specifically through their (iconic, by now) characters, and implicitly uncovering new ways of putting them on stage. The possible performance results are infinite new meanings of old plays, original ways of looking at classic characters and unseen, maybe unimaginable ways of staging the classics. The multidisciplinary theoretical base of this daring aim at Drama and Stage, coming from Pirandello the dramatist, entangles the academic fields of Drama, Feminist Theory, Literary Theory and Epistemology.

Abstract

On September 18, 2019, the Romanian National Opera of Cluj- Napoca celebrated its 100th anniversary and on May 25, 2020, it also celebrated a century from its inaugural performance. The birth of a cultural institution represents in itself the first overcoming of a limit: the limit of perpetuity. The concept of limit arose with the awareness of the finite essence of human nature in relation to its need for evolution and, concurrently, with the craving for freedom, exemplary being a desirable consequence of challenging the limit. In this context, humans discovered and endowed art concurrently with the purpose and gift of sublimating them, of guide them in their effort to explore, understand, affirm and overcome their condition. From the multitude of artistic expressions, opera appears to be, perhaps, the most complex genre. From this perspective, the Romanian National Opera of Cluj-Napoca not only has the virtue of being the first institution of this kind in the country, but also of fully observing its artistic status, of triumphantly overcoming all the challenges it, at a historical scale, through the mists of time. Now that the institution has celebrated its centennial, this is no longer a mere trial, but a confirmation. Through its accomplishments, the Cluj Opera has all arguments to be confident in its ability to persevere in going beyond the most recurrent of limits: the future.