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Open access

Atefeh Moghaddam, Jacques Teghem, Daniel Tuyttens, Farouk Yalaoui and Lionel Amodeo

Abstract

We consider a single-machine bi-objective scheduling problem with rejection. In this problem, it is possible to reject some jobs. Four algorithms are provided to solve this scheduling problem. The two objectives are the total weighted completion time and the total rejection cost. The aim is to determine the set of efficient solutions. Four heuristics are described; they are implicit enumeration algorithms forming a branching tree, each one having two versions according to the root of the tree corresponding either to acceptance or rejection of all the jobs. The algorithms are first illustrated by a didactic example. Then they are compared on a large set of instances of various dimension and their respective performances are analysed.

Open access

Mateusz Lango

Abstract

Sentiment classification is an important task which gained extensive attention both in academia and in industry. Many issues related to this task such as handling of negation or of sarcastic utterances were analyzed and accordingly addressed in previous works. However, the issue of class imbalance which often compromises the prediction capabilities of learning algorithms was scarcely studied. In this work, we aim to bridge the gap between imbalanced learning and sentiment analysis. An experimental study including twelve imbalanced learning preprocessing methods, four feature representations, and a dozen of datasets, is carried out in order to analyze the usefulness of imbalanced learning methods for sentiment classification. Moreover, the data difficulty factors — commonly studied in imbalanced learning — are investigated on sentiment corpora to evaluate the impact of class imbalance.

Open access

Marta Szachniuk

Abstract

In the 1970s, computer scientists began to engage in research in the field of structural biology. The first structural databases, as well as models and methods supporting the analysis of biomolecule structures, started to be created. RNA was put at the centre of scientific interest quite late. However, more and more methods dedicated to this molecule are currently being developed. This paper presents RNApolis - a new computing platform, which offers access to seven bioinformatic tools developed to support the RNA structure study. The set of tools include a structural database and systems for predicting, modelling, annotating and evaluating the RNA structure. RNApolis supports research at different structural levels and allows the discovery, establishment, and validation of relationships between the primary, secondary and tertiary structure of RNAs. The platform is freely available at http://rnapolis.pl

Open access

Paweł M. Stasik and Julian Balcerek

Abstract

Pixel art is aesthetics that emulates the graphical style of old computer systems. Graphics created with this style needs to be scaled up for presentation on modern displays. The authors proposed two new modifications of image scaling for this purpose: a proximity-based coefficient correction and a transition area restriction. Moreover a new interpolation kernel has been introduced. The presented approaches are aimed at reliable and flexible bitmap scaling while overcoming limitations of existing methods. The new techniques were introduced in an extensible. NET application that serves as both an executable program and a library. The project is designed for prototyping and testing interpolation operations and can be easily expanded with new functionality by adding it to the code or by using the provided interface.

Open access

Joseph Gogodze

Abstract

In this note, we propose a game-theoretic approach for benchmarking computational problems and their solvers. The approach takes an assessment matrix as a payoff matrix for some zero-sum matrix game in which the first player chooses a problem and the second player chooses a solver. The solution in mixed strategies of this game is used to construct a notionally objective ranking of the problems and solvers under consideration. The proposed approach is illustrated in terms of an example to demonstrate its viability and its suitability for applications.

Open access

Witold Marciszewski

Abstract

This essay’s content is rendered by the titles of the successive sections. 1. Effective solvability versus intuitive solvability. — 2. Decidability, i.e. effective solvability, in predicate logic. The speedup phenomenon — 3. Contributions of the second-order logic to the problems of solvability — 4. The infinite progress of science in the light of Turing’s idea of the oracle. The term “oracle” is a technical counterpart of the notion of mathematical intuition.

A more detailed summary can be obtained through juxtaposing the textboxes labelled with letters A...F. Conclusion: in the progress of science an essential role is played by the feedback between intellectual intuitions (intuitive solvability) and algorithmic procedures (effective solvability).

Open access

Sławomir Leciejewski

Abstract

Fleck’s concept of thought style allows to realize the fact that in contemporary empirical sciences we deal with a computer thought style, as most research works are currently conducted with the use of computer-aided systems. In this article I support the thesis that contemporary research works are dominated by the computer research style. I refer to the findings of Fleck, Bolter, Castells, Crombie and Hacking.

Open access

Iwo Bładek, Maciej Komosinski and Konrad Miazga

Abstract

Throughout centuries philosophers have attempted to understand the disparity between the conscious experience and the material world – i.e., the problem of consciousness and the apparent mind–body dualism. Achievements in the fields of biology, neurology, and information science in the last century granted us more insight into processes that govern our minds. While there are still many mysteries to be solved when it comes to fully understanding the inner workings of our brains, new discoveries suggest stepping away from the metaphysical philosophy of mind, and closer to the computational viewpoint. In light of the advent of strong artificial intelligence and the development of increasingly complex artificial life models and simulations, we need a well-defined, formal theory of consciousness. In order to facilitate this, in this work we introduce mappism. Mappism is a framework in which alternative views on consciousness can be formally expressed in a uniform way, thus allowing one to analyze and compare existing theories, and enforcing the use of the language of mathematics, i.e, explicit functions and variables. Using this framework, we describe classical and artificial life approaches to consciousness.

Open access

Paweł Stacewicz

Abstract

In this article I defend the thesis that modern computer science has a significant philosophical potential, which is expressed in a form of worldview, called here informational worldview (IVW). It includes such theses like: a) each being contains a certain informational content (which may be revealed by computer science concepts, such as code or algorithm), b) the mind is an information processing system (which should be modeled by means of data processing systems), c) cognition is a type of computation. These (pre)philosophical theses are accepted in many sciences (e.g. in cognitive science), and this is both an expression and strengthening of the IWV. After a general discussion of the relations between philosophy, particular sciences and the worldview, and then the presentation of the basic assumptions and theses of the IWV, I analyze a certain specification of thesis b) expressed in the statement that “the mind is the Turing machine”. I distinguish three concepts of mind (static, variable and minimal) and explain how each of them is connected with the concept of the Turing machine.

Open access

Paweł Polak and Roman Krzanowski

Abstract

Pancomputationalism is quite a wide-ranging concept, but most of its variants, either implicitly or explicitly, rely on Turing’s conceptualizations of a computer and computing, which are obvious anthropomorphisms. This paper questions the concept of pancomputationalism based on Turing computing and asks what concept of computation can be used to avoid the constrains of anthropomorphisations.