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Petr Mašek

Open access

Miloslav Študent

Abstract

This study gives an overview of lute and guitar tablatures in the holdings of the National Museum (at the Czech Museum of Music and the National Museum Library), and it briefly characterizes them in the form of a catalogue. Since music from the Strahov and Lobkowicz collections, which also involve a rather large set of tablatures, has been returned to its original owners in restitution, the study provides up-to-date information about where this historical material is now kept. It reflects new knowledge and discoveries (lute tablature with the shelf mark KNM Nostic gg 412). The composers presented (e.g. G. P. Foscarini, P. Mutti, N. Vallet, Ch. Mouton, P. I. Jelínek, A. Dix, M. Galilei, J. Dowland, Ch. de Lespine, J. Regnart, S. L. Jacobides, J. Ch. Beyer and many others), living and working in the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, are primarily Italian, French, German, and Czech, and with respect to social classes, they represent practically all of the environments where playing on plucked instruments was cultivated.

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Olga Mojžíšová

Abstract

Bedřich Smetana made three lists of his own compositions. The first, dated 1841, presents a selection of compositions from the period of his grammar school studies in 1840–1841. The second was made in Sweden in late 1858 and early ’59, and it contains works composed in Prague and Gothenburg between 1845 and 1858. The last, most extensive list was made gradually from 1875 until 1883. The most important list is the second one, which gives a nearly complete overview of Smetana’s works from the 1840s and ’50s, and it is of particular value for the Prague period through 1856, during which the genesis and chronology of his works are less clear. The introductory part of the study characterizes all three lists and provides information about their creation. This is followed by an edition of the second list with commentary. The edition presents a complete version of the list based on the original, and in the appended commentaries, it explains and, where necessary, corrects Smetana’s information on the basis of the sources and of the discoveries of existing Smetana research.

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Eva Paulová

Abstract

This study reports on interesting holdings in the musical iconography collection of the Czech Museum of Music. Drawings by the sculptor Karel Otáhal (1901–1972) that are related to music and musicians were created for the most part at concerts of the Prague Spring festival between 1946 and 1969. He had already begun making portraits of musicians by the end of his studies, when he created a sculpture of Jan Kubelík. His works are a specific expression of portrait realism and of the ability to capture the typical movement and characteristics of the person depicted. He met in person with musicians, and his drawings bear valuable dedications and commemorative musical quotations by important figures of Czech and foreign music. Unlike the other creators of such drawings, he was merely an enthusiastic observer, but not a caricaturist. Otáhal’s drawings serve as a unique source on the history and dramaturgy of the Prague Spring festival, including its politicization in the 1950s.

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‘The power of a country resting in agriculture is always stronger than that based on factories, which will, if indecently proliferated, only produce a large number of beggars.’

The Diseases of Central European Modernization in Austrian Pre-March (Vormärz) and Revolutionary Journalism as a Discursive Landscape

Jakub Raška and Matěj Měřička

Abstract

This article is devoted to an early discussion of pauperism and the social question in the early stage of Central European industrialisation on the pages of periodicals of the Habsburg Monarchy with an emphasis on Czech journalism. The authors attempt to follow the development of the discussion from the beginning of the 1830s until the collapse of the revolution of 1848. They pay attention to the semantic dynamics of the terms and discourse that were used in connection with mass poverty, as well as the foreign models that contributed to the specific expression of ideas of the causes of the social question and its solutions. The paper studies the development of mass poverty representation at the time from the general Romantic rejection of the modernisation process to proposals for solutions to the social question, which had already been formulated on the basis of affiliation to a political group.

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Jakub Michl

Abstract

In 1776, the convent of Elizabethan Nuns in Prague’s New Town was commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of two events: the profession of the former Mother Superior M. Deodata a Presentatione B. V. Mariae OSE (née Anna Justina von Klausniz) and the laying of the foundation stone of the convent building. The celebrations of this dual anniversary were also reflected in the institution’s musical life. There was a performance at the convent of a congratulatory cantata with a libretto by the ex-Jesuit Rochus Elinger, and music was composed for it by the local choirmaster M. Juliana a Septem BB. Patribus OSE. On Holy Saturday, there was a performance of the sepolcro Der verlorne Sohn (The Prodigal Son), composed by Emilián Rickert OCist. from the monastery in Zbraslav. That same year, Jáchym Štěpanovský, the cantor from České Budějovice, also dedicated his works to the Mother Superior.

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Petr Tvrdý

Abstract

Text provides a summary of the regional literary production concerning Karel Havlíček that was published in Německý and Havlíčkův Brod in the 20th century. Since more significant interest in this native of Borová was associated with his special anniversaries, the author also pays more detailed attention to several collections that were devoted to this topic and, in the local conditions, significantly affected the tradition of Karel Havlíček. The author farther mentions typical phenomena connected with Havlíček: the unveiling of his statue in the Future (Budoucnost) Park in Německý Brod in 1924, the celebrations of the local secondary school in 1935, the renaming of the town to Havlíčkův Brod in May 1945, the attempts to publish Havlíček’s collected works by the publisher Chvojka, as well as the renewal of the journal of the Brod museum. The text is also a contribution to the perception of Karel Havlíček in the past, especially in the periods after 1918, after the Second World War and in the 1950s.

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Magdaléna Pokorná

Abstract

Lajos Kossuth (1802–1894) has been the symbol of not only the revolution in Hungary in 1848 but also of the Hungarian national movement in general. The article draws attention to some major published reflections of Hungarian politics and mainly its representatives in the Czech press in 1848–1852 with particular focus on Lajos Kossuth in the texts by the journalists Karel Havlíček (periodical production) and Ludwig Rittersberg (Kapesní slovníček novinářský a konversační /A Pocket Dictionary of Journalism and Conversation/). With respect to the genre diversity of their publications (the periodically issued press in the case of Havlíček and collected works, albeit of journalistic character, in the case of Rittersberg), however, it would be almost purposeless to compare these two testimonies of the period in question in detail. Each of them fulfilled their role in the public space: one was engaged in news reporting, whereas the other, after some time, remembered the values, people or events gradually forgotten in the changing political situation after the defeat of the revolution. Although Havlíček and Rittersberg were not in entire ideological agreement and alienated during the revolutionary period, they both criticised Kossuth’s national policy towards Slavs. Havlíček’s Národní noviny [National Newspaper] and his Slovan [The Slav] as well as his publication Duch Národních novin [The Spirit of the National Newspaper] and Epištoly kutnohorské [The Kutná Hora Epistles] were officially forbidden in 1850–1851; likewise the publication of Rittersberg’s work in the Austrian monarchy was forcibly interrupted at the entry ‘Medakovič’ in 1852. In this connection, the author also mentions the prepared glossary of another part of Rittersberg’s work, which remains unprocessed in the Literary Archives of the Museum of Czech Literature, paying attention to Rittersberg’s focus on major Hungarian figures, life and institutions. In the next part of the work, the author, based on her analysis of the list of prohibited publications (Chronologicko-abecední seznam tisků zakazáných v monarchii podle nařízení ministerstva vnitra z roku 1851 a tiskového nařízení policejních úřadů z roku 1852 /A Chronological-Alphabetical List of Publications Prohibited in the Monarchy According to a Decree of the Ministry of the Interior of 1851 and a Press Regulation of Police Authorities of 1852/) has provided specific examples of the restrictions to which the books published on the topic of Hungarian revolution had been subjected. Nevertheless, the governmental authorities were not satisfied with the policy of prohibiting individual publications, so that, in the end, a ban was imposed on 3 March 1853 on any information on Kossuth as well as on the Italian revolutionary Mazzini and on their ‘treacherous proclamations’.

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Petr Píša

Abstract

Based on an analysis of monographs and the main scientific studies devoted to Karel Havlíček, the article aims to present the basic topics and directions of research on Karel Havlíček while drawing attention to professional desiderata. It deals with Havlíček’s monumental biography by Karel Kazbunda, which was not published until five decades after it was written, and other, smaller monographic publications on Havlíček. Among other things, the paper describes also other works analysing Havlíček’s other life, his work as a journalist and his involvement in the polemics against the book of poems České listy by Siegfried Kapper, and indicates new impulses for research brought by the editorial preparation and synoptic analysis of Havlíček’s correspondence.