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Alena Petruželková

Abstract

In November 1951, books, manuscripts and other archivalia were confiscated during house searches in the flats of Karel Teige and Eva Ebertová. The confiscated set of books was considered to be lost until 1994, when it was handed over from the State Archives to the Library of the Museum of Czech Literature. The article presents a fragment of Teige’s library in terms of thematic areas and identified provenances (dedications, glosses and additions, stamps, signatures). Another part of the article analyses Teige’s paper ‘Ten Years of Surrealism’, which was presented at a discussion evening of the Left Front and published in the collection Surrealismus v diskusi [Surrealism in Discussion] (1934), and Teige’s corrections and additions found in a copy from the confiscated collection. In the text, Teige systematically removed morphological and syntactic archaisms as well as filler words. In addition, Teige made numerous formulation changes and additions in many places of the text, especially those dealing with the relation of psychoanalysis and surrealism. In these passages and also in a part of his article on the Kharkiv Resolution, Teige refers to A. Breton, he quotes from the First and Second Manifestos of Surrealism, and he maps the Breton / Aragon conflict within the French group. Because of the frequency of the changes in the text, the article covers only selected changes always representing a certain type. Therefore, it is not a textological article, but it turns the attention of Teigean researchers to a previously unknown version of one of Karel Teige’s key texts of from the 1930s.

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Jana Kantoříková

Abstract

The aim of this article is to present the roles of Miloš Marten (1883–1917) in the Czech–French cultural events of the first decade of the 20th century in the background of his contacts with Hanuš Jelínek (1878–1944). The first part of the article deals with Marten’s artistic and life experience during his stays in Paris (1907–1908). The consequences of those two stays to the artist’s life and work will be accentuated. The second part takes a close look at Miloš Marten’s critique of Hanuš Jelínek’s doctoral thesis Melancholics. Studies from the History of Sensibility in French Literature. To interpretate Marten’s reasons for such a negative criticism is our main pursued objective. Such criticism results not only from the rivality between Czech critics oriented to France, but also from different conceptions of the role of critical method and the role of the critic and the artist in the international cultural politics. The third part concludes with the critics’ „reconciliation‟ around 1913 by means of the common interest in the work and personality of Paul Claudel.

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Catherine Servant

Abstract

The aim of this article is to describe the beginnings of the cooperation between Hanuš Jelínek and the journal and publishing house Mercure de France. In March 1900, Jelínek published, under the pseudonym Jean Otokar, his first study ‘La Poésie moderne tchèque’ in the Parisian journal. For some time, the critic then wrote the column ‘Lettres tchèques’ (August 1900 – February 1903) in Mercure – after Alexandr Bačkovský (alias Jean Rowalski) and before William Ritter. The early origin of the ‘Lettres tchèques’ of Bačkovský and Jelínek as a result of the aesthetic affinity between literary and artistic modernism on the one hand and some French and Francophone circles of the time on the other has the merit of introducing the readers of an important French periodical to Czech production. These columns have their firm place in the history of Czech efforts to gain recognition in France and the French-speaking world.

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Jean Boutan

Abstract

Although Hanuš Jelínek gives a rather marginal place to the poet František Gellner both in his History and in his Anthology of Czech Literature, he tends to express particular sympathy for him, sharing with him the Bohemianism of the student years in Paris. A close study of his few translations of Gellner’s poems into French reveals his romantic and cosmopolitan interpretation of the work, contributing to a definition of Jelínek’s own stylistic choices.

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Petra Hesová

Abstract

The article focuses on the elucidation of the broader context of the cultural, social and political activities of Josef Václav Frič during his emigration to Paris. It outlines the circumstances of his efforts to promote the Czech issue in Europe and popularise it among the wider public. It thus draws attention to Frič’s key platforms of sociability and communication: the possibilities of contemporary periodicals and the first association of compatriots in France, Českomoravská beseda (Czech–Moravian Beseda). The accompanying visual material includes representative examples of extant archival materials from Frič’s legacy and from the collection of his personal library.

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Jaroslava Kašparová and Jana Konečná

Abstract

The National Museum Library contains the personal library of an outstanding Czech critic and modern art theorist, Karel Teige. From the 1920s, he was in touch with the founders and important representatives of modern art movements, mostly from France, whose relations and cooperation are i.a. demonstrated by the books donated to him. The article presents several dedications by André Breton, Tristan Tzara, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Le Corbusier and Salvador Dalí.

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Barbora Půtová

Abstract

The article focuses on the life and work of Božena Jelínková-Jirásková (1880–1951), which are described and interpreted by means of a content analysis of her correspondence and artistic production. It presents the basic phases in the artist’s life and work in terms of the influence of her father, the writer Alois Jirásek, and subsequently her husband, the diplomat and writer Hanuš Jelínek. The study provides a chronological overview of the course of her education, life in Paris, exhibition activities, social contacts and artistic movements that affected her paintings. In this respect, a source of inspiration for the work of Jelínková-Jirásková can mainly be seen in the work of Paul Cézanne and Otakar Kubín, with the latter of whom she maintained long-term contacts. The central motif of their work was a landscape, comprising not only a major theme of her artistic production, but also a form of search for personal identity, internal security and a familiar home. A partial objective of the article is to cover the artistic development of Jelínková-Jirásková from Impressionism to realistic and figural work, her subsequent inclination to Neoclassical landscape painting and eventually a return to Realist painting, the Czech landscape and still lifes. The article presents Jelínková-Jirásková as one of the first Czech professional painters to have achieved recognition in both Czechoslovakia and France.

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Miloš Zelenka

Abstract

The paper evaluates the importance of the French-written Histoire de la littérature tchèque I–III [The History of Czech Literature] (1930–1935) by Hanuš Jelínek (1878–1944), a leading expert and authority on French–Czech cultural relations. His synthetic work destined for French readers and completed outside the modern methodological context of the 1930s draws on Ernest Denis’ concept of Czech literary development as the ‘literature of struggle’ against the German element, while its composition is inspired by Arne Novák’s history written in German, and his expository method follows in the footsteps of his mentor Jaroslav Vlček. Therefore, Jelínek conceives literary development as a continual motion of ideas within an aesthetic form, as a subject-stratified, multi-layered story unified by the central outlook enabling him on the one hand to emphasise the nationally defensive aspect of Czech literature, and, on the other hand, to present it through parallels and illustrative examples within the European perspective. Jelínek’s Histoire, supplemented with a number of his own translations of Czech authors, is a particular narrative–historical genre – the epitome of the young Czech nation’s cultural policy and an archetype of cordial relations between the Czechoslovak and French cultures.

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Jaroslava Kašparová

Abstract

The article points out the uniqueness of the personal book collection of the Czech poet, translator and theatre critic Hanuš Jelínek, one of the most prominent figures in Czech–French cultural relations. Based on the owner’s last will, it has been deposited in the National Library in Prague since 1951, when the book estate was handed over to the National Museum after the death of his wife, Božena Jelínková-Jirásková, an academic painter, and it also contains books that belonged to her. The book collection, which still awaits further research and is hardly known to the wider professional public, is a very valuable source on the life and work of Mr and Mrs Jelínek as well as an important source of information on the history of Czech-French cultural transfers and the cultural history of Europe in the first half of the 20th century.