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Vasilica Bălăiţă

Abstract

The experience of the master class held by the actress Roberta Carreri (Odin Theatre) at the National University of Arts, Iaşi, has made me understand the necessity of the theatre laboratory born out of the need to leave aside all other concerns, including that of making “good” theatre. The workshop means letting yourself carried in silence as an active life principle, by other principles – of the stage movement – rediscovering the expressiveness of the body as form and sonority. It means forgetting everything you think you know about theatre and what has become an automatism; fighting with the everyday movement, abandoning it. The technical terms that designate the two types of action on the stage are “everyday movement” – where the brain acts in accordance with and by reason of automatisms, and “extra-everyday movement”, where the brain must make the effort to think in spite of the automatism. The extra-everyday movement elaboration comes from an excess/waste/potentiation of energy that is achieved by acting according to certain principles. These were carefully described in the theatre dictionary compiled by Eugenio Barba and the Italian theoretician Nicola Savareze, following half-century experiences through international confrontations of the Asian and European theatre/dance.

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Ramona-Petronela Iacobuţe

Abstract

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, the search for a form of theatre that is as close as possible to the ideal became more intense and the active involvement of the public a habit. Likewise, postmodernism has become more and more present in the theatre shows. For the new generations of spectators, postmodernism in theatre is no longer an element of novelty and not even so difficult to digest, because when you grow into a certain historical period, you easily assimilate the features reflected in all aspects of life, cultural, social or political. A special generation from which the audience for the theatre under the postmodernist empire has been selected is generation Y, the generation of those born between 1980 and 1995. For this generation, Shakespeare, for example, can also be extremely cool, not only a classic. Among the performances that claim a modern Shakespeare, helped by video projections and modern music we can focus on the shows Hamlet, directed by Ada Lupu Hausvater at the National Theatre in Timişoara, and, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Radu Afrim, and also Hamletmachine, directed by Giorgos Zamboulakis.

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Luminița Milea

Abstract

An incursion into the Romanian musical life is always a pleasure, a moment of harmony, feeling and excitement. However, the turmoil of contemporary life sometimes brings us back to reality, urging us to check its pulse and to objectively look towards the future. Postmodernism, with its multiple facets, is in such times a subject for reflection, given its force which touched not only the artistic dimension, but also the communicational one, creating mutations which were difficult to imagine several decades ago. The past and future brought into the present are oscillating on the axis of time, and the interference between art, science and technology are embodied into an indestructible entity. Bringing the mundane usefulness and derisory in relation with beauty and harmony, this phenomenon has become permanently set into the area of objective reality, generating at times conflict, at times coexistence in the creator – performer – public spectator relation.

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Alexandra Bandac

Abstract

Postmodernism is still a landmark for theatre creators worldwide. Hard to define, it proposes, as Umberto Eco also acknowledged, a critical view of the past, filled with witt and irony, when referring to a disbalanced present, lacking value or perspective. It seems relevant, when talking about postmodernism, to yield Samuel Beckett’s writings, his prose and his theatre being stamps of change in the middle of the XXth century. We chose for analysis the play Waiting for Godot, which uncovers postmodern traits, and by discovering them, the text is better understood for the director or actor who is to stage the play or a character from it.

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Diana Nechit

Abstract

Intertextually, eclectically, stridently and parodically, without performing an extremely de-dramatizing process of Ibsen’s textual core, Botond Nagy’s show, Hedda Gabler (Radu Stanca National Theatre of Sibiu), is a nonconformist experience that proves the general tendency of the transcripts of the great masterpieces of universal dramaturgy, exploding the audience perception through a complex arsenal of musical and cinematic influences. Presented for the first time to the Sibiu audience on February 22, 2018, Hedda Gabler, directed by Botond Nagy, is, according to the director, a techno-poetical installation orchestrated by the conventions of an almost psychedelic incursion into human futuristic imagination, raises the reception standards the more so as the strategy applied by the young theatre director evokes a peculiar universe which is apparently incompatible with the fervent core of this drama.

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Ioana Petcu

Abstract

Art movements don’t end up at a precise moment, but they can survive over the decades in different ways, even if they could be considered out of date. Today, we live in the post-human or the post-digitalized era, but here and now we also recognize marks or processes derived from the art of the ‘80s. What are postmodernism’s shadows that have been shaping recent years’ performances and how does Romanian theatre directing look like, seen against the bigger drama background in or within our European continent – those are the two main questions to which our study tries to find potential answers. Given that we don’t want to lose ourselves into various theatre productions, we have chosen to verify this with an ageless play – Hamlet. How do they (still) look like and what do they hide again, the new profiles of the prince who speaks to us about the death of sleep’s dreams – those are the questions depicted from the hyper-technological identities of Hamlet ex machina.

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Otilia Huzum

Abstract

The basis of the progressive functioning of the human beings lays in these two fundamental components: the intellect and the affective part. They cannot be separated, but they converge towards the same goal, although they are not in absolute mutual subordination. Extrapolating on the idea of the actor, we can say that the starting point for the artistic creation is represented by thought, imagination and improvisation; all of them accomplished in a systematically designed organization, with the aim of alterity appearing. The character is brought to life through the body of the actor, without being able to tell exactly how much of this is the artist’s emotion and how much the character’s. Also, the character’s emotions cannot guarantee purity, unless we consider the representation of the presence a moment of scenic, but not life-like truth. If we think of Peter Brook’s words, “a play is play”, the comments will remain open to many possible responses.

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Cristi Avram

Abstract

This article follows the concept of postmodernism through the eyes and work of a contemporary director – Romeo Castellucci. Owing to the fact that this artistic current is constantly developing, trying to define it would be rather useless, although some of its particularities are worth to be mentioned: eclecticism, fragmental, the syncretism of arts, destroying convention, the performance, the installation etc. The above mentioned Italian director is one of the best examples of postmodern directing. Among his great creations, one stands out: the trilogy which develops from Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. By analyzing this production, one may unravel traces of postmodernism.

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Alin-Daniel Piroşcă

Abstract

Set in the postmodern culture cadres that Lyotard talked about twenty years ago, we are witnessing an accelerated mistrust of a conspicuous value. In fact, all this mistrust has occurred amid a radical overthrow of the way we were accustomed to perceiving the values of modernity. Having its starting point in philosophy, falling into disuse that postmodernity propose grows like a wave that appeared after a stone was thrown into the water. Theatre has not escaped from postmodern articulation, and its subjects have inevitably passed through the postmodern reconfiguration filter. In this article, we will talk about the subject of eroticism, trying to outline our thesis on the idea that the comprehensive synthesis of the receiver in relation to the postmodern performance is based on the construction of the subject folded on the identification of some indicators. Considered as a cultural construct, eroticism is eliminated through its discourse and requires scenarios to be fully understood and recognized. The question inevitably arises: to what extent can we talk about these scenarios in the postmodern performance?

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Beatrice Volbea

Abstract

As human beings and artists, what we produce, as well as our own selves, are visibly influenced by a complex ensemble of processes that take place around us and, in time, we can actually be regarded as their result. This evolutionary principle also applies to the role that body expression has in the wide specter of arts, including in dramatic dance and dramatic theatre. All along the XXth century and up until the first decade of the XXIst century, new performative genres have developed, for example, under the influence of political, social and cultural theories and philosophies. The result was the evolution of numerous alternative forms, supported by revolutionary theories in the dramatic field and by new approaches towards performance. Among these, we can find concepts like physical theatre, total theatre and dance theatre, all of them focusing on body expression. A notable aspect of these changes is the fact that they share the recurrent idea of a fusion between different artistic forms, incorporating dance, dramatic play and other theatrical elements in the creative processes and their outputs.