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Abstract

This article offers a case study in intermediality and explores relationships between tableaux vivants performances and early cinema around 1900. It locates processes of intermedial exchange not only at the level of form but also at the level of modes of address and reception. More specifically, the study is concerned with how bourgeois notions of beauty were transferred to the film image and reconciled with the attraction value of cinema. As a discussion of early film theory reveals, the concept of “beauty in film” depended on a taming of filmic motion, something that had already been realized in performance practices of tableaux vivants. In the subsequent analysis of the cultural context of tableaux vivants in European variety theatres, I outline a specific mode of address, which I term “beauty-as-attraction:” an overlap of the older aesthetics of the beautiful and the more modern aesthetics of attraction. Through concluding film analysis, I show how tableaux vivants became a model and source of inspiration for early cinema, thus bringing to fruition the two-fold address of beauty-as-attraction in a new media context.

Abstract

I argue that the trope of the doll, recurrent throughout the films of Manoel de Oliveira, is a visual figure that beyond narrative becomes a discourse on modernity and modernism, stillness and movement, life and death. Accordingly, I propose an overview of occurences of dolls and of “dollness” throughout the work of Oliveira – from Aniki Bobó (1942) to The Strange Case of Angelica (2010) – with the aim of tracking the line of transformations of an emblematic object into an aesthetic principle, a central figure involving psychoanalytical concepts such as the Freudian “uncanny,” the fetish or the transitional object.

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Abstract

In 2017, the National Museum commemorated the bicentenary of the discovery of the Manuscript of Dvůr Králové and the Manuscript of Zelená Hora by further material research into both works and especially by an exhibition of their originals. The main aims of this research into the manuscripts included the documentation and evaluation of their current physical condition and the mapping of the effect of the microchemical analyses performed in the context of the disputes over the authenticity of the manuscripts between the middle of the 19th century and the 1970s. For the achievement of these objectives, a detailed documentation of all the pages of the manuscripts in different types of lighting (visible direct, lateral, transmitted, ultraviolet, infrared), optical microscopy, and the identification of the degradation productions of damaged places by means of X-ray fluorescence analysis and Raman spectroscopy were used. This provided new information on the current physical condition of the manuscripts and documentation of the damage caused by historical microchemical testing. In addition, some previously unpublished historical tests were identified, thus offering a new perspective on some current damage of the two manuscripts.

Abstract

The article works with sources concerning the history of the library of Bohuslav Dušek (1886–1957), a bank clerk and a collector of books and art. Dušek built his library, comprising more than 3,000 volumes, from the beginning of the 20th century. Despite changing state regimes, he kept it until his death. His second wife, Hermína Dušková (1910–2012), organised the library and donated it in 1977 to the National Museum Library. The personal archival collection of Bohuslav Dušek, deposited in the National Museum Archives, provides as-yet unpublished information on the development of the library and its owners as well as on the process of the handover of this unique collection to the National Museum Library.

Abstract

The article presents recently found fragments of an Old Czech Biblical manuscript from the 15th century, namely the Bible of Pernstein (Prague, National Library of the CR, shelf mark XVII A 7), representing the third redaction of the Old Czech Bible translation. The twenty strips from eighteen parchment folios contain short passages from various Biblical books and Biblical prologues.