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Arnoldas Stramskas

Abstract

This article provides a broad overview of social, economic, and cultural politics in Latin America, especially concentrating on what became known as the Latin American literary “boom” in the 1960s and 1970s, and the region’s political context - colonial past, neocolonial/neoliberal present, the role of intellectuals within the state and cultural affairs. The second part focuses on Roberto Bolaño - the writer who put Latin American literature on the world map which has not been seen since the boom years - and his novel The Savage Detectives. The aim of this article is to demonstrate that literature not only shares common elements and possible intentions with social and political critique, but that it can also be an effective form of social and political criticism. In such a case, Bolaño’s work may be read not as inferior fictional account but as a complex, intersectional investigation of socioeconomic as well as ontological condition in Latin America that other modes of inquiry may overlook.

Open access

Aušra Vrubliauskaitė

Abstract

The paper is concerned with the status of language and its usage in Zhuangzi and how this particular way of viewing and using language can affect our “perception” of Dao. Zhuangzi’s language skepticism is first introduced and possible reasons for Zhuangzi’s mistrust in language are explored. The question is then raised as to why Zhuangzi himself used language to talk about Dao if he mistrusted it. At this point Zhuangzi’s usage of language is discussed in two aspects: the negative aspect and the positive aspect, the latter being the main concern of this paper. The negative aspect is exposed as the denouncing factor of employing (fuzzy) language to undermine (propositional) language while using different techniques (paradox, uncertainty/doubt, mockery, reversal). The positive aspect is explored as twofold: first, putting language and reason to their “proper” limits entails an acquisition of a broader perspective and a more receptive, open state of mind which prepares one for the wordless “perception” of Dao. Second, fuzzy language is presented as capable of “accommodating” silence and emptiness. Doing so it unites silence and speech giving an incredible insight of what Dao is about. An approach taking from both the principles of scholarly analysis and an unrestricted personal experience of the text is employed.

Open access

Arvydas Kumpis

Abstract

Zainichi Koreans have been attracting and recently attract more and more attention from the scientists and journalists. This tendency is welcoming, because Zainichi Koreans, as a socio-political phenomenon, have to be investigated and presented not only to the fellow researchers, but to the mass audience as well. Nevertheless, the constantly growing amount of literature still has not been analyzed in historiographical manner. The lack of such works makes it quite difficult for other researchers to start working on Zainichi Koreans’ issues. Social scientists usually do not conduct their own separate historiographical research; therefore, the understanding of a particular issue is a matter of one’s own efforts. Researches on Zainichi Koreans have been conducted since the early sixties and ever since then there have been changes in mainstream theories, approaches or methodologies. In order not to repeat the mistakes of other researchers, or conduct what has already been done, it is crucial for the scientists to be aware of the previous progress. In this paper I provide the review of the present historiography on Zainichi Koreans, including publications since 1962 till 2009. It is important to mention, that this review does not contain all possible positions of Zainichi historiography - only a certain part of them was taken to present the tendencies throughout the aforementioned period of time.