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Anisa Astra Jingga, Mardiyana and Triyanto

Abstract

Mathematical connection ability helps students to understand the concepts and the applications of mathematics, in this context, the teacher as an implementer of education has an important role to make a mathematical connection in their instruction. An ethnographic study was conducted to determine the teacher’s ability to make mathematical connections. A certified teacher with 30 years of teaching experience is observed and is interviewed to obtain the data. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The findings show that the relationship between mathematics and everyday life arises as a mathematical connection in the form of different representations. When the teacher shows that a sentence can be another representation of a mathematical symbol, then those activity is a configuration of mathematical connection representation. In this study, the part-whole relationship is obtained not as a generalization but as a specific example. The relationship between ideas, facts, and concepts in mathematics appears in every construction, however, the process of knowledge construction is only carried out in the form of procedure and implication.

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Jurgita Vaičenonienė and Jolanta Kovalevskaitė

Summary

In Lithuanian public and academic discourse, discussions about the influence of English have received considerable attention. Much has been written on the English borrowings in Lithuanian or various translation strategies applied at word, phrase or syntactic levels of language, whereas there have been only few attempts to investigate how Lithuanian translated from English differs from original language. This is why we found it interesting to investigate lexical an morphological features of translated Lithuanian applying the methods of corpus liguistics. For research purposes, we used a morphologically annotated comparable 4 mln. word corpus of original and translated fiction and popular science literature ORVELIT. It has been found that translations deviate in certain ways from original Lithuanian. Translated Lithuanian has: a lower lexical density, higher proportion of function words, shorter sentences, and higher proportion of list heads; translated fiction has a lower lexical variability and smaller proportion of low frequency words, whereas in popular science translations, these differences are less evident. Keyword analysis has shown content differences in originals and translations and the overuse of personal and possessive pronouns in popular science translations. The distribution of content and function words differs in originals and translations and in different registers. Translated Lithuanian has: more verbs (especially finite forms and adverbial participles), but less nouns and adjectives; fiction translations have less and popular science more adverbs than originals; there are more pronouns and prepositions in both popular science and fiction translations; depending on the register, there are higher or lower numbers of conjunctions, particles and interjections. Some of the differences may be explained by the English language interference as: the overuse of the optional 1st person pronoun in subject position, the overuse of optional preposition “su” with instrumental case, or the overuse of optional link verb in the complex predicate. In other words, the English influence is seen in transferring certain features obligatory for analytical language where omission would be a more natural choice in original Lithuanian. These findings in most cases agree with the previous research on translationese of other languages. It is hoped that the identified tendencies to over- or under-use certain lexical and morphological features as a result of English language interference might appear to be useful when editing and translating.

Open access

Mateja Berčan and Marija Ovsenik

Abstract

The presentation of the professions from the older generation to elementary school pupils is one of the segments of intergenerational learning and intergenerational cooperation. Young people meet a person who actually did a particular occupation or profession. The older generation explains to the young generation what is needed to learn for a particular profession, and the young generation have the opportunity to test, or at least monitor the work they would do in the profession. The aim of our survey was to confirm that intergenerational learning is one of the cornerstones of quality aging. The data was collected with the survey questionnaire, which 200 representatives of older generation aged 65 and more have answered and was then quantitatively analyzed using a quantitative methodology. The results of the research confirmed that intergenerational cooperation through intergenerational learning, which involves the presentation of a profession of older generation to younger generation, affects the quality of life in the third life period. We can conclude that within intergenerational learning older generation gets the opportunity to transfer their knowledge, experience and share it with young generation, which leads to a higher quality of life even in the third stage of life. The younger generation is able to acquire concrete and useful information about professions first hand and in addition learn about aging and social tolerance.

Open access

Anna Zelenková and Dana Hanesová

Abstract

The aim of the authors is to respond to the growing demands on the intercultural competence of university teachers due to intensified internationalization pressures on higher education, especially due to the growing number of students and teachers’ international exchanges. They report on an intercultural course design responding to this need, presenting a case study from Slovakia. First, they define the need of intercultural competence of university teachers, especially those teaching in English-medium study programmes. Then they share a) findings from a needs analysis preceding the design of a new curriculum for an intercultural competence course (ICC) at Matej Bel University (MBU) with three aims (development of linguistic, cultural and pedagogic competences); and b) results from action research during piloting the ICC course. A comparison of 2011 and 2018 surveys pointed to the growing dominance of the English language, including an increasing command of English by MBU teachers. The ICC curriculum, tailored to the pre-identified teachers’ needs, proved to be a feasible way of facilitating their intercultural competence. Its implementation revealed persistent prejudices and difficulties associated with overcoming them. It also confirmed a significant deficit in preparing university teachers for their role as intercultural mediators in English-medium courses.

Open access

Zuzana Sándorová

Abstract

The present paper is founded on two pillars. Firstly, it is one of the current trends in education worldwide, i.e. to connect theory and practice. Secondly, it is the need to be interculturally competent speakers of a foreign language in today’s globalized world of massive migration flows and signs of increasing ethnocentrism. Based upon these two requirements, the ability to communicate in a FL effectively and interculturally appropriately in the tourism industry is a must, since being employed in whichever of its sectors means encountering other cultures on a daily basis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to find out undergraduate tourism students’ opinion on the importance of intercultural communicative competences for their future profession as well as their self-assessment in the given field. The findings of the research, which are to be compared to employers’ needs, revealed that there is considerable difference between the respondents’ views on the significance of the investigated issues and their self-esteem.

Open access

Rowland Chukwuemeka Amaefula

Abstract

This study examines the social constructions of gender as the encapsulation of reiterated human conducts within varying sites of performance. Contrary to the notion that gender roles are fixed by socio-cultural forces, this paper focuses on the fluidity of human dispositions in differing circumstances. Adopting Judith Butler’s theory of gender performativity, the researcher analyses Tess Onwueme’s Then She Said It. This protest play attests to the variability of gender performance. The characters in the drama, especially the protagonists and antagonists, exhibit considerable alterations in gender performance in different situations. Thus, the study argues that the rigid classification of gender roles along sex lines (on both biological and gendered sexuality) in protest drama in Nigeria is incongruous with the characters’ dispositions in the plays. Indeed, characters adopt cross-gendered performances as a strategy of protesting against overbearing conditions.

Open access

P. P. Khoroshikh and A. A. Sergievich

Abstract

This article is devoted to an analysis of the main mathematical concepts of one of the indigenous peoples of the North: Evenks. This is the first attempt at the systematisation and understanding of Evenks’ accumulated stock of mathematical knowledge. The study has shown that the total mathematical knowledge of this group underlies the sociocultural environment and traditional way of life. The main function of mathematical concepts is to give information about the number of animals in the camp, and to specify the direction of movement during hunting. In addition, it is noted that mathematical representation is closely interrelated with the general knowledge about the world The selection of separate groups of numerals allows the author to specify the area in which they are used. Common geometric representation is reflected in the applied art.

Open access

José-Serafín Clemente-Ricolfe and Paula García-Pinto

Abstract

This study quantified Erasmus students’ motivations for studying abroad. Surveys were completed by 120 Erasmus students at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and their motivations for studying abroad were analysed via factor analysis. A two-step cluster analysis was used to segment students’ behaviour based on their motivations. Four factors were obtained: individual development, destination choice facilitators, academic aspects and the destination’s strong points. Behaviour was not uniform, and two different segments were found. In the first, which we refer to as “without perceived motivations”, no motivation was positively rated, while in the second, “with perceived motivations”, academics were a key motivating factor. Universities should consider working with the tourism sector to offer activities related to local culture. They could also organise classes outside of school hours to help Erasmus students learn Spanish.

Open access

Amin Karimnia and Meisam Jamadi

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between English teachers’ epistemological beliefs and moral dilemma. In doing so, 70 English teachers were selected from different language institutes and were included in the research sample. The instruments used to collect the data included the Schommer Epistemological Questionnaire (SEQ) and the Defining Issues Test (DIT). The collected data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation method and descriptive statistics in SPSS software. The findings revealed that the participants believed that knowledge improves with experience over time, and that there was also an innate ability to acquire knowledge. They also displayed conflicting views about the simplicity/complexity of knowledge. The analysis of different stages of moral development in the views of the English teachers showed an ascending trend in the moral development from stage 2 (the focus on personal interests) through stage 6 (appeal to intuitive moral principles/ideals). Besides, significant differences were found among different stages of moral development as assessed by the EFL teachers and also in terms of the impact of different moral reasoning schemas on the participants when making judgments about different moral dilemmas.

Open access

Ohanaka Blessing Ijeoma and Adeleke Ismaila Oladipo

Abstract

An individual experiences boredom when an activity is neither entertaining nor conducive. Academic boredom and its negative influences include dissatisfaction and low arousal in school activities, depression, high school dropout, lack of academic goal orientation, abusive behaviours as well as poor academic performances among students. The study sought to investigate the efficacy of Systematic desensitization on academic boredom among students in Edo State Secondary Schools. The research used quasi experimental design adopting the pretest-posttest non-equivalent control group experiment. The population for the study consisted of One thousand, five hundred and eighty-two (I,582) SS2 students from Seven (7) public schools in Oredo Local Government Area of Edo State. The sample for the study was made up of two intact classes comprising of 91 (Ninety-one) SS2 students. The instruments used for the study is Boredom Proneness Scale (BPS), developed by Farmer and Sunberg, adapted from Obisanya with a test retest reliability co-efficient of 0.792. The findings of this study showed that Systematic desensitization was effective in reducing academic boredom. It was also more effective than the control group (non-attention). It is therefore recommended that reciprocal inhibition can be used to desensitize the students by counsellors. In the classroom, the teacher should note individual differences, engage students in classroom activities, use real life situations and also make learning interesting.