Browse

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 71 items for :

  • Political Economics x
  • Modern History x
Clear All
Open access
Open access
Open access

Tom Phillips, Antonia Young and Elizabeth Gowing

Open access

Leszek Kwieciński

Abstract

The article explores the main elements of the creation a proinnovation policy in Poland as a new case of public policy. It analyses the current status of proinnovation policy in Poland and the relationships implicit in the Polish National Innovation System. The findings support the conclusion that Polish proinnovation policy and the system through which it is enacted are at an early stage of development which is characteristic of co-called ‘catching-up’ countries. The findings show that there is a need for the strategic and holistic management of this type of sub-functional system to enable it to support SMEs in the development of their capacity for innovation. This should include a wide range of public and private institutions in the context of multi-stage governance.

Open access

Antonia Young

Open access

Edita Gzoyan

Abstract

The League of Nations played an important role in securing the Armenian community after the 1915 genocide of Armenians in Ottoman Turkey. Nonetheless, the Armenian Question, which had a definite political accent during the First and Second Assembly of the League of Nations, remained unresolved. Afterwards, the League reformulated its policy towards the Armenian case, which involved an explicit shift from a political to a humanitarian point of view.

The humanitarian actions had a number of different aspects: the liberation of the Armenian Genocide survivors from Turkish and Islamic institutions, the provision of Nansen passports to Armenian refugees, the settlement of Armenian refugees in Soviet Armenia and the establishment of Armenian communities in Syria and Lebanon.

This article touches upon these initiatives, concentrating on the settlement of the Armenians in Syria. The League of Nations elaborated a massive program for the settlement of Armenian refugees there, which laid a foundation for the establishment of the huge Armenian diaspora in that country.

Open access

Martyn Housden

Abstract

Paul Schiemann was one of the most significant ethnic Germans left outside the German state by the post-First World War peace settlement. As editor of Rigasche Rundschau and an active politician in the new Latvian state, he was well placed both to comment on developments in the political life of the Baltic region and to attempt to work towards responses to them. This article focuses specifically on his journalism during the critical years 1919-20. As the Latvian state was forming against a background of considerable on-going violence and instability, Schiemann disseminated consistently a call for reconciliation between Latvia’s mutually suspicious national groups. The paper examines the compelling arguments he used.

Open access

Vassilis Petsinis

Abstract

This article focuses on Eurasianism as an ideological trend with a political appeal beyond the post-Soviet space. It demonstrates that the roles envisioned for the ‘Trojan horses’ of Eurasianism among the far right in Central/Southeast Europe and for Eurasianism’s sympathizers in Western Europe bear a qualitative difference. In the former case, the emphasis is on systemic transformation whereas, in the latter case, on a gradualist strategy.

Open access

Lucia Morawska

Abstract

This paper discusses a Chasidic pilgrimage movement focused on Lelov, which lies south of Cracow. Pilgrimage has always been a major part of Jewish tradition, but for many years during the Cold War it was possible only for a devoted few to return to Poland. With the collapse of Communism, however, pilgrimage sites in Central and Eastern Europe have become much more accessible and consequently ultra-orthodox Jews have created a ‘return movement’.