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Open access

Igbudu Ujiro and Erhabor Igbinosa Norris

Abstract

Increase in population contributes and it is also affected by climate change, hence it deserves consideration in any climate change policy development strategies. Based on the importance of population growth on climate change, this study was embarked on to ascertain the perception of students to the influence of population growth on the consequences of climate change. The population of the study consisted of undergraduate students in a Federal University in Southern part of Nigeria. A sample size of 362 respondents were selected using systematic sampling to select every one and other halls of residence (3 halls of residence selected out of 6) and simple random sampling of balloting by replacement to select 14% each from the three halls of residence. The questionnaires administered were analyzed using SPSS version 20 and the descriptive and inferential statistical tools were employed to analyze the data gotten. The study revealed that there was a significant difference on the respondents perception based on their gender, age group and home of residence(Urban or rural). Based on these findings, it was recommended among other things that population control measures should be effectively implemented in the country. And any policy on climate change, gender, age group and location should be considered because a gender, age group and location bias policy will increase the severity of the problem.

Open access

Adrian Papajani

Abstract

The study aims to provide a picture of the content and presentation of history texts for the fifth grade of basic education during the period of communist rule in Albania (1946-1991). Part of the analysis in the study are elements of design, organization of written text, book size, paper quality, font size, etc., as an important part of a textbook. The methodology used relies on the prevailing situation in the field and the lack of a single methodological model for studying history texts. For this reason, she relied on a list of questions about the content and pedagogic elements of history texts compiled by UNESCO expert Robert Stradling, adapted to the features of the historical period that include texts taken in the study. The analysis was accompanied by the processing of quantitative and qualitative data extracted from the history textbooks, including illustrations, classified into several sub-categories based on their importance for the development and acquisition by students of historical concepts of “change” and “continuity”. The survey findings reflect the most important features of the field for a period of 45 years, some of whose deficiencies, despite ongoing improvements, continue to be present in current textbooks.

Open access

Sumyah Alnajashi

Abstract

This study aimed to examine whether instructing readers to judge text information can impair or facilitate their ability to recall information from expository texts of different genres. Experiment One used four expository texts and examined three types of orienting instructions: To answer pre-text questions, to be prepared to answer questions after the reading the text, to be prepared to judge the knowledge introduced in the text. The results of the study indicated that the use of pre-text questions did not improve readers’ performance in a recall test; in fact, they impaired the readers’ overall recall ability. However, being forewarned that they would be asked to provide a judgment on the information contained within a passage after reading it did enhance the participants’ ability to recall information from expository texts. Experiment 2 used the same four expository texts and examined the relationship between text recall and participants’ judgement of text information with particular cognitive abilities. The results reveal variations in the patterns of correlations between recall and rating of the text and other cognitive factors across the different text genres. The outcomes and implications of this research are discussed in this paper.

Open access

Eric Anane and Juliana Audria Dankwa

Abstract

The role of women in society seems to be predefined in terms of cultural and physiological lines. Some people think the woman is not capable of taking up some executive positions, because they are weak and too feeble to handle certain kinds of work. However, the last decade has seen huge progress in the employment of women in the formal sector. This study therefore explores the factors that affect the work and family life of female lecturers. Data was generated from the administration of questionnaires on 105 women lecturers, who were conveniently selected from two public universities in the central region of Ghana. Our findings from the study indicated that factors such as teaching large classes, lack of teaching/learning materials, family responsibilities and pressure and demanding Deans and Heads of Departments, affected female lecturers’ job performance. The results also suggest that females academics involved in the study were least bothered about issues on their promotion and personal goals. We recommended that University management would have to come to terms with the requirements of managing tension among women to make the environment potentiating and favourable so as to keep adroit women in higher education.

Open access

Simeon Olayinka Olajide, Thomas Ajibade Adebisi and Tosin Adebola Tewogbade

Abstract

The study assessed the availability of laboratory resources, teachers’ and students’ involvement in practical activities in Basic Science in junior secondary schools in Osun State Nigeria. These were with a view to ascertain the availability of laboratory resources in the teaching of Basic Science in junior secondary schools and the involvement of teachers and students to practical activities in the state. The study employed a descriptive survey research design. The population for the study consisted of all Basic Science teachers, facilities for teaching Basic Science and all junior secondary school II students in Osun State. Ten schools were selected from each senatorial district through simple random sampling technique, from each school, ten students from JSSII were also randomly selected through simple random sampling technique to take part in the study. Basic Science teachers found in the schools were purposively used for the study because of their discipline and numbers. The facilities for the research were also purposively selected based on a must for teacher to use in the course of their teaching. Three instruments were used for data collection. They are: Observation Checklist for Basic Science Laboratory Facilities (OCBSLF), Questionnaire for Teachers on Teachers Involvement in Practical Activities (QTTIPA) and Students’ Questionnaire on Basic Science Laboratory Facilities (SQBSLF). Data collected were analyzed through simple percentages. The results of the study showed that 14(40.0%) schools indicated that beakers, boiling tubes, conical flask and cylinder are available while 21(60.0%) schools indicated that beakers, boiling tubes, conical flask and cylinder are not available, 10(28.6%) schools indicated that flat bottom flasks are available while 25(71.4%) schools indicated they are not available, 11(31.4%) schools indicated that round bottom flasks are available while 24(68.6%) schools indicated they are not available, 8(22.9%) schools indicated that hand lenses are available while 27(77.1%) schools indicated they are not available, 7(20.0%) schools indicated that Ammeters are available while 28(80.0%) schools indicated they are not available, 9(25.7%) schools indicated that Resistance box are available while 26(74.3%) schools indicated they are not available, 3((8.57%) schools indicated that plastic mammalian models (heart, eye, ear, and skeleton) and First Aid box (fully equipped) 3((8.57%) are available while 32(91.3%) schools indicated that they not available, 1(2.86%) schools indicated that Meter Rule, Rheostats, Connecting wires, Spatula are available while 34(97.4%) schools indicated they are not available. The results of the study showed that on the average teachers did not use laboratory facilities to teach the students and students are rarely involved in practical activities in schools. The study concluded that laboratory resources are not available to teach students Basic Science in junior secondary school level.

Open access

Vera Arhin, Tabitha Wang’eri and Edward Kigen

Abstract

This research investigated the impact of academic advising on student retention in distance learning at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. Explanatory sequential mixed methods design was adopted for the study. The multistage sampling technique was used to sample 727 student participants from a sampling frame of 8731. Four academic advisors and three counsellors at the College of Distance were purposively selected for the study. Further, 16 students who had dropped out from the college were sampled using the snowball sampling technique. A researcher-self constructed questionnaire and a semi-structured interview guide were used to collect data. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Analyses of qualitative data were done using Merriam analytical coding process. At an alpha level of .05 academic advising made a non-significant contribution to prediction (p = .10) which implies that academic advising is not a significant predictor of student retention in distance learning. The study concluded by recommending that academic advisory services should be provided in a practical manner to address the specific needs of students at the College of Distance Education of the University of Cape Coast.

Open access

Ervin Balla

Abstract

Teachers play e key role in the process of teaching. In this article it is tried to focus on some of the most important roles that the teacher of English language plays during the difficult process of teaching. The role of the teacher in class is important. In the class teachers are: leaders of the language, thinkers, administrators, surces experts, vigilants, material furnishers, organizers, performers, estimators, listeners and controllers. At the recent literature is posed the question of the ideal teacher, so what makes a good teacher? According to Medgyes P. All the teachers are extraordinary according to their ways and different from eacher other. According to him the concept of the ideal teacher does not fit to a single concept, because many things have to be taken into consideration. Another image of English teacher is the teacher who is expert of the English language. According to Whitaker the English teacher needs to own the subject and to make the students to follow willingly the subject. He not only should own the subject but he should also know how to explain it.

Open access

Omawumi Doreen Osa-Omoregie and Roselyn Jummai Musa

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to find out the level of the listening comprehension strategies that junior secondary school students in Oredo Local Government Area of Edo State use in learning English Language. From a population of six thousand five hundred and thirty four (6534) Junior Secondary 3 students in public schools, a total of six hundred and sixty two (662) students constituted the sample size drawn through the stratified sampling and simple random techniques from six (6) sampled schools. Two instruments titled Listening Comprehension Proficiency Test (LCPT), developed by TOEFL and Listening Comprehension Strategy Questionnaire (LCSQ) adopted from Oxford (1990) Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) were used to collect the data for the study. The data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation). Results indicated that among the six strategy categories, Metacognitive (M=2.16, SD= .46), had the highest mean, followed by the Cognitive (M=1.97, SD= .34), Compensation (M=1.97, SD=.46), Social (M=1.95, SD=.47) and Memory (M=1.89, SD=.41). Affective (M=1.84, SD=.43) had the lowest mean. On the average, all the variables put together the findings from research question 2 indicates that the subjects had a mean score of 1.96 which is lower than the theoretical mean of 2.0. This indicates that students′ use of listening strategies is low. As a result, the study proposed that learners should be exposed to listening strategy instruction.

Open access

Lalida Sasai

Abstract

This study highlights the interrelationship among self-regulated learning (SRL) skills, the use of online portfolios, and social cognitive learning theory. It was conducted as a longitudinal mixed-methods study over one academic year with students enrolled in a postgraduate professional practice programme. The study used both quantitative and qualitative statistical analyses. Results showed a strong positive correlation between SRL skills and the perceptions of the usefulness of online portfolios. Based on these results, the researcher have suggested a new model which integrates students′ use of online portfolios; the influence of online portfolios on students′ SRL skills and vice versa; and the three social cognitive learning theory factors of person, behaviour and environment and their effect on students′ SRL skills across the three phases of forethought, performance, and self-reflection within an online learning environment.

Open access

Maiyoua Vang

Abstract

Michigan’s Public Act 436, commonly referred to as the Emergency Manager Law, has provided for state installed emergency managers to oversee financially distressed municipalities as well as school districts. Given that a number of Michigan school districts, suburban, rural, and urban, have been operating at a deficit for several years and yet only the financial status of majority Black school districts (Detroit, Highland Park, Muskegon Heights) have triggered this takeover law, this field experiment investigated the effect of school district’s racial composition on both the level of support for state-installed emergency managers in districts and the level of support for politically material resistance to the application of that remedy. Implications regarding policy and critical policy research are forwarded in light of the results.