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Petr Mašek

Abstract

The core of the Višňová castle library was formed already in the 17th century, probably in Paderborn. Afew volumes come from the property of the archbishop of Cologne, Ferdinand August von Spiegel (1774–1835), but most of the items were collected by his brother Franz Wilhelm (1752–1815), a minister of the Electorate of Cologne, chief construction officer and the president of the Academic Council in Cologne. A significant group is formed by philosophical works: Franz Wilhelm’s collection comprised works by J. G. Herder, I. Kant, M. Mendelsohn as well as H. de Saint-Simon and J. von Sonnenfels. Another group consisted of historical works, e.g. by E. Gibbon; likewise his interest in the history of Christianity is noticeable. The library contains a total of more than 6,200 volumes, including 40 manuscripts, 3 incunabula and 15 printed books from 16th century; more than a half of the collection is formed by early printed books until the end of the 18th century. The other volumes come from the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Volumes from the 17th century include especially Latin printed books on law, and one can perceive interest in collecting books on philosophy. There are many publications devoted to Westphalia; in addition, the library contains a number of binder’s volumes of legal dissertations from the end of the 17th century and the entire 18th century published in diverse German university towns. Further disciplines widely represented in the library are economics and especially agriculture, with the publications coming from the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Renáta Modráková

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Miroslava Pourová

Abstract

The article deals with the personal library of Václav Černý. Attention is first drawn to the portrait of Václav Černý as a reader, and the creation and augmentation of his collection (purchases, donations from friends and authors-colleagues, review copies). The paper presents Černý’s family background, studies at secondary grammar schools in Náchod and Dijon, his work abroad as well as at university, and his friendship with numerous colleagues-authors. The next part of the article outlines Černý’s personal library, the general characteristics of the collection, Černý’s methods of book acquisition, his work with books and evaluation of literature. The part of the library containing literature on existentialism is described in more detail. It deals with the predecessors of existentialism as well as Czech and foreign representatives of this philosophical movement. Not even libraries that Černý visited during his life are omitted.

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Jan Pišna

Abstract

The article deals with the book collection of Jiří Ribay, the structure of his ownership notes (on the title page in the form of ‘Jiřího Ribay’, the year of purchase and the price), extant book catalogues from 1800 and 1803, and the copies preserved in institutional libraries in Europe. It has been shown on specific examples how Ribay acquired his books and how he sold some of the books still in his lifetime (e.g. to Mikuláš Jankovič in 1807). Research into archival documents has revealed some new information on how the former National and University Library in Prague acquired a part of Ribay’s books in 1857. The end of the paper outlines the potential use of a complete edition and a new treatment of Ribay’s catalogues for the history of book culture, retrospective bibliography and literary history.

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Vojtěch Kessler

Abstract

The paper focuses on three figures connected with the Austro-Prussian War in 1866. As the conflict is not a part of the Czech national narrative, it does not present strong personal stories understandable to a broader audience or forming a part of historical awareness of the public. Numerous figures are to be found in the space between the historical reality, myth, tradition and a deliberate literary fiction, but none of them is a part of a universal consensus of understanding – the ability to be placed in time and space. The article focuses on the three figures of the topic of the Prussian-Austrian war that could help to shed some light on several causes of the phenomenon described.

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Marta Vaculínová

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to show the situation of the National Museum Library (NML) in the period of 1939–1945 based on archival documents. Central changes made by the Nazis affected people as well as their work in the NML. It was not possible to continue as before – some employees had been arrested or executed by the Gestapo. Nevertheless, the number of the NML staff increased as a result of the transfer of officials from the closed Ministry of War and Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Two employees of German nationality joined the NML based on the new rules concerning the relations between Czechs and Germans in public services. The operation of the library came under the supervision of Professor Carl Wehmer, who planned a cataloguing reform, was in charge of the book collections and ensured their later evacuation. The plans for a new NML exhibition were cancelled and replaced by propagandistic exhibitions imported from Germany, such as Deutsche Größe. The Nazi ideologists planned to return the National Museum and its library to the original idea of the land museum. Also Emil Franzel, a former leading member of the German Social Democracy in Czechoslovakia, a later member of the Sudeten German Party and in 1940–1941 an official in the NML, followed the idea of a land museum in his book History of the National Museum Library (Prague 1942), the first monograph on the history of the NML.

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Kateřina Spurná

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Jiří Fiala

Abstract

On the Christmas Eve of 1844, the master shoemaker Carl Ertel in Přibor murdered his wife and his three children by slitting their throats, after which he attempted suicide in the same way and died of his injuries on 31 December of the same year. This family tragedy is do cumented by records in the death registry of the Přibor parish. One year later, two broadside ballads of the same strophic structure were created and then printed in Vienna and Banska Bystrica. The author of the composition Žalostivý příběh v novou píseň uvedený… [A Pitiful Story Made into a New Song...] sees the cause of Ertel’s criminal behaviour in his destitution and his eviction from the rented flat, and the composition thus exhibits features of a social ballad; according to the author of the composition Pravdivé popsání o velmi strašném příběhu…[A True Account of a Dreadful Story], on the other hand, Carl Ertel murdered his entire family in a fit of alcoholic rage.

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Renata Ferklová

Abstract

The writer František Křelina (1903-1976) graduated from the teaching institute in Jičin. He first taught at village elementary schools in the Nova Paka and Turnov regions. From the mid-1930s, he was a special subject teacher at the council school in Česky Dub. After the town was occupied following the Munich agreement in 1938, he worked at schools in Prague, where his family had also moved. He considered his teaching profession to be a mission. His success and his popularity are evidenced by the extant correspondence with his former students until the end of his life. His teaching activities were terminated by force in 1951, when he was arrested and subsequently, in 1952, sentenced in a political process to 12 years in prison. He was released on amnesty in 1960, but he was not allowed to return to his profession. He thus worked as a construction labourer, retiring in 1964. In 1965, he was given an unexpected opportunity to work as a substitute teacher at his former school in Česky Dub. Since his rehabilitation proceedings had not been completed, however, he had to leave the school again three days later. In order not to cause problems for the headmaster, he excused his leaving by a pretended illness. Nevertheless, the three days were enough for his personality to leave a deep and lasting impression on the hearts of both his students and his teacher colleagues - their correspondence is full of respect and admiration. The history of the teaching activities of František Křelina, who was not allowed to achieve his full fulfilment, hence demonstrates the violence, malevolence and crimes of Communist totalitarian power.

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Milada Písková

Abstract

The Comenius Museum in Přerov has an interesting collection of chapbooks of Moravian and Slovak provenance. In the early 1990s, it was processed in the form of a museum catalogue including photo documentation. There is no extant record of when the museum acquired this collection. The collection comprises more than two thousand items, the earliest of which come from the 18th century, the latest from the beginning of the 20th century. Most of them were published by the Škarnicl family. They include both secular broadside ballads and pilgrim songs, with religious themes being predominant. Some of them are kept loose while others have been bound into chapbooks with canvas, cloth or leather binding.