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Open access

Anca-Maria Rusu

Abstract

There has been a constant interest in Shakespeare in the last twenty years among playwrights, critics, directors and actors. The revival of Shakespeare studies, the multitude of interpretations, theatre productions, research studies of doctoral type have been not just a reconsideration of texts, but also an attempt to modernise them. These findings and many other reflections on Shakespearean theatre and an amazing diversity, on which it had been founded, are the result of the doctoral research done by Antonella Cornici on the Shakespearean soliloquy and its diverse Romanian stage versions appeared in performances between 1990-2015.

Open access

Lucyna Spyrka

Abstract

The Polish and Slovak languages, as well as Polish and Slovak cultures, are considered very similar, so it would initially appear that there would be no obstacles limiting the possibilities of translating Slovak drama into Polish. It turns out however, that Slovak drama is not often translated into Polish. Older translations that were presented in Polish theatres were rarely followed in the press, and today they have been forgotten. On the contrary, current translations are published far more often than staged. The presented study evaluates this situation as a result of several limiting factors. In addition to the political conditions of cultural exchange and the manner in which publishers and theatres operate in Poland, there is also a linguistic closeness that negatively impacts on the quality of translations, as well as the stereotype of Polish and Slovak cultural proximity, which limits the interest of Polish audiences in Slovak drama.

Open access

Cosmin Matei

Abstract

The present paper describes the process of going through a pilot research phase, intuitive and scientific, from the desire to know what do we express in our corporality when we feel, empathize or play with the imaginary, especially in vocational area of actor’s training. This was done by working with the actor and Professor PhD András Hatházi, within a theatrical laboratory attended by the actor-students of the Hungarian Department, 2016-2019 promotion from the Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Theatre and Film, Cluj-Napoca. The objective of this research was given by the axiology emotion/feelings of emotion; heart/emotional system and brain/mind. Because the social, political, anthropological, and sentimental dimension of the human body has increased, so have the demands on the actors. As practitioners, we felt it necessary for the contemporary actor’s training to benefit from recent scientific observations about the bio-psycho-neuro-physiological processes of the living body, that is why the research has also evolved towards developing exercises to add new information to potentiate acting skills, at an imaginarycorporal level, as well as to achieve balanced parameters in terms of mental, emotional and physical health and integrity, especially post-acting.

Open access

Šárka Havlíčková Kysová

Abstract

The article examines the work of opera director Miloš Wasserbauer during the 50s and at the beginning of the 60s of the 20th century in the Slovak National Theatre. Focusing on the staging of new Slovak operas Ján Cikker’s Juro Jánošík and Beg Bajazid, and Eugen Suchoň’s Svätopluk. The author analyses Wasserbauer’s approach to the productions and Slovak staging tradition from the perspective of the Czech director and the critical reflection of the performances. Special attention is paid to the conceptualisation of Slovak national feeling in the corpus of archive materials.

Open access

Ioana Petcu

Abstract

For a period of time he trained at Bouffe du Nord Theatre, under Peter Brook’s guidance. He worked at Odéon-Théâtre de l’Europe and at the National Theatre of Belgium. He has his own private company, named “Louis Brouillard”. The French Academy awarded him with a prize for his playwriting. Together with his works, those are the most important biographical highlights about the author Joël Pommerat, an undiscovered personality for the Romanian public.

Open access

Anca Doina Ciobotaru

Abstract

In the last century, Romanian puppet theatre has not only received, but it has also given to the world – which I would personally correct. Perhaps: “it has given to the world innovative, poetic performances that have brought about a new aesthetic vibe.” If you skim through World Encyclopaedia of Puppetry Arts (first edition published in French, under the title Encyclopédie mondiale des arts de la marionette, and second edition published in English, under the aforementioned titled, available online at: https://wepa.unima.org/en/), you will find more information on Romanian puppet theatre than you might expect. A complicated history that has been reshaped subjectively – as is the case with every history. And, given that Margareta Niculescu left this world on the 19th of August, 2018, I’ve decided to turn back to the pages 493 and 494 (from the first edition), as if going in a pilgrimage. For quite some time, I’ve been thinking of getting closer to her, all prejudices, myths and subjectivity aside; perhaps Matei Brunul 1 has also helped; do shadows make way for themselves/do they follow us? In any domain, at any time, in any place. What matters is that you want to go back into the light, to free yourself, to be able to remember.

Open access

Alexandra-Ioana Cantemir

Abstract

HostelLand. Boardgame teatral is one of the most recent productions at Teatru Fix in Iaşi, a project that has been made in collaboration with Asociaţia Addarta. This paper will focus on the work methods used in the creative process and the performance form that has resulted – a form that is based on several rules that belong both to the principles of the boardgame that has been created, and to the way in which we interact with the audience. Director Alex Iuraşcu’s decision to structure the performance as a game generates a context in which audience participation is a factor that doesn’t only determine the way in which the performance takes place, but the very possibility of it taking place. A risky endeavour, one might say, but one that, up to this moment, has proven functional every time. The spectators have to become actants, alike the performers, and they gradually go from their role as (active or passive) players to that of citizens who are involved in a debate on the new laws of a state – the fictive, independent state HostelLand, a community formed by the boardgame players.

Open access

Petronela-Ramona Iacobuţe

Abstract

Those who work in today’s theatre are extremely connected to reality. Everything is alive, in a constant change. Many artistic themes are carefully documented from reality, because documentary theatre is, in fact, a mirror of contemporary society. At the beginning of the 21st century, a new generation of theatre directors appeared in Romania, some of them very promising. They did not wait for celebrity and recognition to come get them, but instead they tried to find answers to the Romanian theatre of the future. And, it seems that a possible response was the building of the dramAcum movement. Among the founding artists of the dramAcum movement, the most active is Gianina Cărbunariu, director and playwright. The latest show directed by Gianina Carbunariu, Work in progress, a staging on the changing working conditions well documented from real cases, premiered in 2018.

Open access

Genesis and Other Biblical Events Depicted in Postmodern Drama.

The Case of Tabori’s Goldberg Variations on Romanian Stages

Ana-Magdalena Petraru

Abstract

A complex person (novelist, playwright, screenwriter, translator), George Tabori, pen name of György Tábori, born in Budapest in 1914, was little acclaimed in North America where he spent twenty years of his life and left a mark on the German culture of the 20th century. Due to his cathartic black humour, he overcame the tragic experience of the Holocaust that took away from him almost all his family. Known in post-war drama especially by means of his anti-Hitler farce Mein Kampf (1987) which he authored, directed and acted in, Tabori even took the East-German public by surprise with his special, yet less familiar perspective on history.1 Mein Kampf was the first play that had a Romanian staging, at Cluj; however, Die Goldberg-Variationen (1991), a real international success2, became known to our public at the theatre Radu Stanca in Sibiu under the same title and as Goldberg Show at the National Theatre of Iasi (TNI). Our aim, in this paper, is to analyse the biblical events in the play from a postmodern perspective as homage to the author’s contribution to the philological sub-field of Bible and literature, already consecrated by N. Frye’s Great Code and more recent studies.

Open access

Cristina Todi

Abstract

The aim of this article is that of giving several details on the evolution of dance in Romania. The necessity of addressing this topic is given to the fact that there are many people who conceive sterile discourses in order to come forth with theories on the history of national dance. Frequently ignored or regarded as an easy genre that is strictly related to entertainment, dance is deeply rooted in our DNA, and minimizing the importance of the choreographic art deprives humanity of its existential roots.