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Leadership in the Innovative Organization

Abstract

In the context of the increasing globalisation of value chains the management of both manufacturing and service firms find themselves faced by contradictory pressures to reduce costs whilst at the same time engaging with customers and suppliers in product improvement and innovation. For advocates of lean production methods the answer is often to be found in a check-list approach to rationalising the present modes of value creation within any organization. Much can be gained by combining such approaches with modes of continuous improvement or kaizen. As Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995) have brilliantly illustrated, the most successful of Japanese firms have achieved their ability to adapt and to innovate through the uses of internal and external appropriation of tacit knowledge. For these authors this implied not only a 'bottom-up' structure of formal organization but also a means of listening and translating experiential knowledge into codifiable product and process designs. In the Japanese context this was seen as being brought about by the day-to-day integration of group decision making into operational management as well as the use of special project teams. The application of the methods has proved much more problematic for Western managers, although Japanese transplants have been relatively successful in the same Western context. In this paper I suggest that leadership styles and the formal organization of knowledge creation have to be seen as being congruent both in their aims and in the manner in which they are operationalised. Managers have also to begin by recognising the basis for the psychological contract held with outside customers, suppliers and other organizational members. Quality, especially in service fields, is often in the eye of the beholder!

Open access
The Method for Motivation by Quality Function Deployment (QFD)

Abstract

This paper presented a study on proposing a method for motivation with the use of QFD. It was reported by three students who majored in MOT at Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University in 2009. QFD has been widely used in manufacture and service industries for making improvement with the existing products and programs. However, in this study, QFD was not used in the sense of “activation” to improve motivation. Rather, it took the viewpoint of “what is required by customers”, the central theme QFD, to approach the problem. With reference to the process of knowledge conversion suggested by the SECI Model, the study operated with the basic principles and steps of QFD. In the paper, the major steps of QFD leading to setting quality planning were outlined and the implication of the study was discussed.

Open access
Objective Measurement of the Extent of Conformity to Management System Standards

Abstract

The approach described in this paper relies on a radical and innovative approach to enable a management system to demonstrate conformity to the requirements of an unlimited number of management system standard requirements, at the cost of performing a single mapping exercise. This unique approach relies on interposing a 'process reference model' between the process evidence of the enterprise management system and the normative requirements of various management systems standards of interest. This approach requires that the process evidence of the enterprise management system is mapped to the process reference model elements - a once-off exercise. The mapping of the process reference model elements to the various management system requirements is also performed as a 'once off exercise, and is completely independent of the enterprise management system. By quantifying the judgements made when creating these various links, and by appropriately aggregating the data to derive quantitative results for the extent of the coverage of process reference model (by the management system process evidence) we can derive the extent of the coverage of the requirements of the various management system standards of interest. This leads to a novel result that the question 'how much ISO 9001 have you got?' can be expressed in meaningful, quantifiable and accurate terms, based on objective evidence.

Open access
Performance of Initial Public Offerings: Evidence from Hong Kong

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of a study on the performance of the initial public offerings (IPO) of shares listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEx), which has been the largest IPO market in the world since 2009. One indicator of the success of an IPO is its subscription rate, which can be used as a proxy for the level of investor confidence in the stock being offered. This paper examines the relationship between the performance of an IPO and its subscription rate, and the corporate factors that may affect an investor's decision to subscribe to an IPO. The Hong Kong evidence can help shed light on the importance of agency cost in the pricing of IPOs.

Open access
A Proposed Knowledge Management System in SOFCON: Saudi Arabia Perspectives

Abstract

Knowledge management has became vital in organizations in today's business environment as the implementation of knowledge management tends to provide benefits such as an enhanced way to organize existing corporate knowledge; making individuals more effective at sharing explicit knowledge; and providing new ways to expose tacit knowledge, and in turn this will lead to competitive advantage. It has been argued that the role of quality professional can contribute greatly to knowledge management to include raising strategic awareness, improving the knowledge management process, cost minimization through the usage of one model to blend knowledge management and quality verification and leading the way, and in turn achieving organizational competitiveness. Due to the contribution of quality professional to the enhancement of the knowledge management process, it is suggested that a quality management system that supports all the quality management dimensions and knowledge creation processes will be more effective than one that does not. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to establish a knowledge management system where quality professional will be a key player in capturing the knowledge needed for the needs of small and medium sized organizations in Saudi Arabia.

Open access
Quality Education Management in self-funded Post Secondary Education Institutions in Hong Kong

Abstract

This article discusses the management of external validation exercises (academic audit). Such exercises are now seen as providing an important means for assessing the quality of education in self-funded Post Secondary Education Institutions in Hong Kong, and therefore careful preparation for them is essential. Relevant individual's implicit/tacit knowledge has been converted to explicit knowledge for organizational formal transfer. Ten implementation strategies for the achievement of key performance results are proposed, and a check list of twenty tasks is formulated, against which institutions might assess their level of achievement and evaluate their readiness for external validation.

Open access
The Road Towards Lean Six Sigma: Sustainable Success Factors in Service Industry

Abstract

It has been widely investigated that the application of operations management techniques is not only based on technical factors, but it is mainly associated with organisational factors such as culture, previous polices and procedures, etc. A prime example of promisng operations practices is Lean Six Sigma (L6σ). The main research question for L6σ is related to its liabilities and constrains regarding its implementation. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the critical factors related to the application L6σ. The context of the analysis is service industry since it seems that it has been neglected from the literature that mainly focuses on manufacturing. The methodology was based on the qualitative exploration of three case studies from the service industry. Secondary data were collected through an analysis of companies' documents, written procedures and quality assurance policies and primary data were collected through a number of in-depth face-to-face interviews with managers and quality experts. The findings show that there are ten (10) particular factors that influence the implementation of L6σ in service organizations.

Open access
Social Responsibility is Free & Sustainable - Why Doing Good While Doing Business is Good Business

Abstract

CSR is good for business in two broad ways: the generation of revenues and investment through the creation of a positive image; and the avoidance of loss, through the avoidance of a negative image. We look in particular from a marketing and quality assurance position in taking this view of CSR as value creator and loss avoider. Specifically, how CSR relates to trust, and can be a driver of trust. Trust is a crucial area of business, not particularly well-explored in the literature. Trust relates to how an organization relates to its investors, its employees, its recruits, its customers, and even its regulators. Trust is a key factor in facilitating transactions and building sustainable relationships.

Open access
Some Practical Issues in the Application of Lean Six Sigma to Service Systems

Abstract

Six Sigma as a quality improvement framework has gained considerable popularity in the past two decades. Its extension Lean Six Sigma has also been embraced by many organizations for improvement of quality and business competitiveness. One important factor for the popularity of Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma is their potential for improving service systems, in contrast to the conventional perceptions that only manufacturing systems can benefit from statistics-based methodologies. There are however a number of issues related to the nature of service systems that must be resolved before the full benefits of Lean Six Sigma can be realized. In this paper, these issues are discussed from a practical point of view from three angles: analytical, organizational, and personal. Awareness of the existence of such issues, if not the answers to all of them, is a pre-requisite to effective adoption of Lean Six Sigma tools.

Open access
Strategic Alliances, Total Relationship Management (TRM) and 5 QS - Why Most of the Marriages and Strategic Alliances are not Sustainable?

Abstract

The paper describes theoretically with some empirical evidences the decision and result of strategic alliance as a relationship between people or as a love affair and a commitment to marriage which is ideally, based on shared interest, love, mutual trustworthiness, and commitment to continue the relationship. The main point is that, just as successful human marriages require clarity of needs, purpose, maturity, preparation, patience, nurturing, flexibility, commitment, trust, and compromise, so too will such prerequisites apply to successful organizational strategic alliance relationships. The main task of this conceptual research is to identify the reasons for failures (non-sustainability) of strategic alliances to answer the question of why do they fail. The problem will be later on (phase 2) analysed taking into consideration different industry sectors located in different countries

Open access