Browse

41 - 50 of 60 items :

  • Cognitive Linguistics x
  • Linguistics and Semiotics x
Clear All
Prosody of the viewpoint in political discourse

Abstract

The article reports on the study of the prosodic characteristics of the utterances expressing viewpoint in English political discourse. The paper draws on the findings made in the course of the auditory analysis of presentations delivered by politicians. The work contains an overview of political discourse and viewpoint studies. Special focus is given to prosodic variations of viewpoint in political public speech.

Open access
The topos “revenge” in the Gothic narrative “A legend of the Nightfort”: ways of crystallisation

Abstract

The article explores how the meaning of the topos revenge is crystallised (accumulated and interpreted) in the gothic narrative “A legend of the Nightfort” at two planes: internal (the one concerning the narrator-narratee roles) and external (concerning the implied author-reader roles). Both planes are linked in the process of intranarrative transgression, where the first mode of crystallisation is regarded as an allegorical interpretation of revenge and the second one – as a symbolic interpretation.

Open access
When phonetics matters: creation and perception of female images in song folklore

Abstract

This paper presents a stylistic analysis of female images in American song folklore in order to examine how sound symbolic language elements contribute to the construction of verbal images. The results obtained show the link between sound and meaning and how such phonetic means of stylistics as assonance, alliteration, and onomatopoeia function to reinforce the meanings of words or to set the mood typical of the characters. Their synergy helps create and interpret female images and provides relevant atmosphere and background to them in folk song texts.

Open access
Death in Metaphorical Language

Abstract

The article presents the analysis of the lexical phrases employing the selected elements of the cognitive frame of DEATH. A brief outline of the symbolism of death is also noted. The corpus for the present analysis has been collected from a number of lexicographic sources. The research results point to the negative meaning of most phrases where death, dead or to die are employed.

Open access
Language Worldview of Yakima Indians, Compared with English and Ukrainians

Abstract

The problem of conceptualization the information as well as its further verbalization remains one of the topical issues of present-day linguistic research, though the languages of Native Americans (like Sahaptin – the language of the Yakima nation) still need a more detailed analysis. The present study is the first to single out the means of verbalization the information on ENVIRONMENT & TIME in two distantly related languages (English and Ukrainian) on the background of Sahaptin (the language of Yakima people).

Open access
Meaning-Making Processes in Derivatives from Precedent Names

Abstract

The paper addresses the issue of meaning-making in a highly prolific and sprawling segment of English vocabulary – derivatives from precedent names (DPNs). The combination of cognitive linguistics methods applied to analyze the semantics of DPNs (Robin Hood cluster, Cinderella-based blends and Dorian Gray effect) permitted to account for their bias towards polysemy, which seems to be basically grounded in the process of metonymic zoom-in on the selected content in the event frame that describes the precedent name, oftentimes leading to domain extension and indeterminacy.

Open access
The phraseological meaning construal in the traditional vs. cognitive culture-oriented perspectives

Abstract

As a point of departure, the paper discusses two approaches to phraseological meaning: traditional and cognitive. Following the latter as well as certain semiotic and cultural accounts of language, semantics, and idiomaticity, I seek to elaborate a cognitive culture-oriented theory of phraseological meaning. This theory is tested against the basis of a representative corpus of selected Russian phraseologisms (more than 1000 items) that describe various aspects of verbal communication, e.g., igrat’ komediyu (lit. to play comedy), zloj yazyk (lit. an evil tongue). The results obtained are supported by the cross-cultural study of Russian and English phraseological units.

Open access
Speaking to the Global Audience: A Case Study into the Message Transformation

Abstract

This paper presents a pragma-rhetorical analysis of persuasive discourse performed by applying the information theory, modelling the process of public communication, and employing the classical notions of ethos, pathos, and logos in order to examine the factors that affect the communication process in the culturally and linguistically heterogeneous environment and to foreshow the meta-linguistic strategies, which could serve as global rhetorical maxims or universals.

Open access
Temporality in Manyōshū

Abstract

Using the Manyōshū corpus, the paper argues that conceptual metaphor theory imposes limitations on the diversity of linguistic facts, particularly those concerning the speaker or the poet who is communicating. The paper offers explanations of the nature of time by drawing upon the inference operating within “basic sign structure”, specifically, indexicality and iconicity, both of which are at the heart of human semiotic activity.

Open access
Towards Understanding of Conceptualisation in Cognitive Terminology

Abstract

The paper describes the nature of the concept in terminological research introspectively leading to a cognitively grounded framework and usage-based study in cognitive terminology, where conceptualization is revealed on the basis of the dynamic character of human scientific thinking, cognitive systems directly affecting terminological systems and professional discourse, and representing conceptual organization of special knowledge on the basis of linguistic and extra-linguistic factors.

Open access