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Assessing Residents’ Satisfaction with Planning and Neighbourhood Facilities of Some Public Housing Estates in Benin City, Nigeria

Abstract

The objective of the study is to analytically assess the residents’ perception of planning of six housing estates and their satisfaction levels in Benin City, Edo state, Nigeria. The population of the study comprises all residents of the six housing estates in Benin City as at 2018 which is the study period. The data were collected from the six (6) estates covered by this study: Oluku Housing Estate, EDPA Housing Estates Ugbowo, Federal Housing Estate, Oregbeni, Federal Housing Estate on Ikpoba Hill, Iyekogba Housing Estate, Ebo Village, and Andrew Wilson Housing Estate, Evbuoriaria. A total of 1200 copies of questionnaires were administered across the six housing estates. However, the total response rate of 1000 was achieved as only these copies of questionnaires were retrieved in usable format. Descriptive statistical tools such as means, standard deviations, kruskal-willis test and categorical regression analysis were utilized for the data analysis. The result showed that the relative satisfaction index scores for the all the estates are on the fairly satisfied region (RSI: 2.1-3.0) and this implies that residents are fairly satisfied with the estate planning conditions. The Kruskal-willis test confirms the absence of any significant differences in RSI scores across the estates while the categorical regression analysis results shows that estate planning has a positive effect on residents satisfaction and this is significant at 5% (p=0.003) which implies improvement in estate planning results in higher satisfaction levels. The study recommends the need for Government policy to encourage a decent living environment in terms of planning of estates.

Open access
Beyond the Conventional Development Approaches: Evolving and Institutionalizing the Strategic Framework for Sustainable Wealth Creation and Development in Odukpani Local Government Area of Cross River State, Nigeria

Abstract

Given the low level of economic development and the attendant burgeoning social vices at local level in Nigeria, this study illuminates on the strategic framework for sustainable wealth creation in Odukpani Local Government Area of Cross River State. The study argues that rather than the constant reliance on the ‘one size fits all’ analysis which has fundamentally blurred the minds of development experts and policymakers, greater emphasis should be placed on context-driven and specific studies. Among other things, the study notes that context-driven studies would enable each local government identify problems peculiar to it and evolve problem-solving measures consistent with local realities and demands. In the context of the present study, we share the optimism that Odukpani Local Government Council should prioritize wealth creation as basis for stimulating economic growth and development in the area. The study relies on triangulation of data involving interviews with key stakeholders, on-the-spot observation, participatory rural appraisal and information derived from relevant literature.

Open access
Common and Special Features of the First School of Drawing in Albania and the First School of Applicative Arts in Kosovo

Abstract

This article tries to give a vivid frame of the historical background of the development of figurative art in both sides of Albanian boarders, thus that of Kosovo and Albania, as a unique belonging of the same national features. It is represented through a historical and theoretical background so that to show the roots and the layers of the development of art in Europe, which is in all senses the impact Albanian art, but not only has taken from. Pure and concrete examples of Albanian painters of the very first generation and as an inspiration to what follows later, are given to demonstrate the will and need of Albanian society to cultivate artistic tastes.

Open access
From a Culture of Borders to Borders of Cultures: Nationalism and the “Clash of Civilizations” in International Relations Theory

Abstract

The Peace of Westphalia signed in 1648 signaled the beginning of the modern international system of states. International relations (IR) theory identifies this treaty as the founder of the principle of political sovereignty whereby each nation-state has full control over its territory and domestic affairs, thus it is the beginning of an international system of states. The latter is based on the sanctity and inviolability of interstate borders as its main defining feature. This paper investigates the recent developments in international relations and their significance to the concept of borders in IR theory; on the one hand, a “clash of civilizations” thesis assumes that new “fault lines” borders among civilizations of, mainly, different religions are taking precedence over traditional territorial borders of nation-states, while, on the other hand, a rise in conservative nationalism and, possibly, protectionism, over the traditionally liberal West reasserts the primacy of territorial borders in IR. In particular, this study examines whether such developments signal a paradigm shift in IR theory that may necessitate revisiting certain fundamentals of mainstream respective theories.

Open access
Managing Organizational Conflicts: A Study among Organizations in Kosovo

Abstract

Organizations and managers during their organizational activities, not rarely face different conflicts. Managers, depending on their gender, use different ways to resolve these conflicts while this reflects on their subordinates. The purpose of this study is to analyse the most common approaches applied to resolve conflicts in organizations in Kosovo and the impact of gender on the choice of style to handle conflicts. The study employs a quantitative approach whilst convenience sampling method is used for the purpose of selecting respondents. The study is conducted in ten largest companies in Kosovo in which hundred employees and fifty managers were included. A structured questionnaire is used to collect primary data and necessary tests were conducted through SPSS. Results reveal that managers use the integrative style more than other styles during the conflict management process; gender partially affects the choice of the style and the style of conflict management affects the likelihood of managers among employees. The study suggests that the field of conflict management among organizations in Kosovo needs more academic research.

Open access
Primary Schools Readiness for Health Emergencies among Primary Schools in Delta State, Nigeria

Abstract

The study was meant to explore the readiness of primary schools toward school health emergencies in Delta State, Nigeria. The method was the use of exploratory / descriptive study design of the expost facto method. Three variables of personnel, equipment and environment were used, while three research questions and three hypotheses were used as a guide. Simple questionnaire of Yes or No was used to generate data. Descriptive statistics of frequency count, percentages and paired t-test statistics were used to analysed the data. It was found that personnel for school health emergency were not available in schools and were found to be negatively significant at −30.97 (p = 0.05) and had negative correlation of −1.00. Equipment was found to be available (at least, at the level of First Aid Box) and found significant at paired t - test value of 19.01 (p = 0.05) while environment for school health emergency was not available and negatively significant at paired t – test value of -111.891 (P = 0.05). The study concluded that readiness of primary schools in Delta state for health emergencies is still at its infancy. The study concluded that readiness of primary schools in Delta State is still at its infancy. It was recommended among others Government and stakeholders in primary school education should provide at least one school health Nurse in every primary school and school health teachers be provided with opportunity of training in First Aid and school health emergency.

Open access
CLIL4CHILDREN: Teaching Materials for CLIL Lessons in Maths, Geography and Science for Primary School

Abstract

This article describes the didactic principles underlying the creation of a ready-made fifteen lesson plan package for primary CLIL (for Maths, Geography and Science) for pupils aged 5 to 12, developed through the collaboration of an international group of English and primary teachers, teacher educators, researchers and teaching materials developers across four European countries in the framework of the CLIL for Children (C4C) project (2015-2018) on educating teachers for CLIL teaching environments. These principles are presented in the framework of a brief state-of-the art discussion on the lack of ready-made teaching materials for CLIL, their importance for teacher development and quality teaching and learning in CLIL classrooms, and criteria they should conform to. The article proceeds by summarising the findings of two C4C surveys, one on best CLIL teaching practice through national reports of four European countries (Italy, Portugal, Poland and Romania) and the other on Open Educational Resources (OER) available for CLIL Maths, Science and Geography, as well as by drawing on C4C Guidelines. The article then demonstrates these principles in practice through a module of a three lesson plan sequence for CLIL Science on the topic “The World of Plants” by showing how language (vocabulary or content-specific terminology and language functions), specific communication skills, content and culture are integrated and developed through a child-centred, holistic (Brooks and Brooks), constructivist approach. Digital technologies are included as everyday learning processes for access to knowledge and playfulness in learning. Methodologies for active, experiential, discovery, problem solving and cooperative learning are foregrounded. The article further highlights how teacher cooperation and teacher identities (English and primary education teachers) as individuals with multilingual repertoires, expectations, and expertise are crucial for producing quality CLIL materials and resources.

Open access
in e-TEALS
Developing Learners’ Intercultural Understanding through a CLIL Approach

Abstract

Language and culture are interconnected and teaching a language should also be concerned with offering learners a wide range of opportunities to gain insights into other cultures. Content and language integrated learning (CLIL) approaches have an invaluable contribution to make towards developing learners’ intercultural understanding (ICU), by making the content culturally relevant to the language of instruction. Within this paradigm, this paper presents the findings of an action-based research project seeking to develop ICU among secondary learners of French in England, through the teaching of a series of lessons following a CLIL approach. Stemming from its findings, it is proposed here that a renewed understanding of CLIL be defined, in which CLIL would stand for Content and Language Intercultural Learning. Within this framework, the content would be conceptualised through the lens of culture, to offer learners opportunities to compare and contrast experiences and viewpoints, to develop their cultural knowledge, as well as their intercultural skills and attitudes – by means of exposure, independent exploration and collaborative work. The language, still driven by the content, would encompass both the language of learning, and the language required through the learning processes - and would be language that is both accessible and cognitively challenging. Learning would occur through cognitively demanding content that is real, relevant and engaging, yet accessible to all.

Open access
in e-TEALS
Digital Competence and CLIL: The Use of WebQuests in Bilingual Education

Abstract

This paper discusses the use of WebQuests as an activity to combine competencybased learning and digitalization in a CLIL context through social tasks. In the 21st century, people need to use the knowledge they acquire in multiple scenarios. Thus, the educational system must provide learning contexts where students develop competences so that they are able to apply the knowledge they need in a culturally heterogeneous world. Integrated learning advocates the use of social tasks in bilingual scenarios. In order to solve a problem or explore an issue while creating a specific learning product, students connect different types of knowledge and thus acquire a more contextualized perspective of learning as a socially relevant activity. This kind of learning can be perceived as a bridge between the students’ educational context and daily lives. The digitalization of education is crucial for understanding how society advances and works as many of the jobs that appear in the future will require digital literacy. In this paper, an example of a WebQuest in a CLIL class in Spain is presented as a model for competency-based learning and digitalization through a social task.

Open access
in e-TEALS
English Medium-Instruction as a Way to Internationalization of Higher Education in Kazakhstan: An Opinion Survey in the Innovative University of Eurasia

Abstract

This article presents the results of a survey conducted in the Innovative University of Eurasia (InEU) about the necessity of implementing English as a medium of instruction (EMI) at the baccalaureate and master’s degree levels. It describes the findings obtained through semi open-ended questionnaires and interviews with two focus groups: InEU administration members and faculty representatives. The data collected suggest a rather positive general attitude of the respondents of both groups to English-medium instruction at the university, a special emphasis being made on the global status of English and internationalization of education. However, the majority of respondents raised concern about the impact of English-medium teaching on the quality of subject learning since it depends on an English proficiency level of both students and teachers and their motivation to study/teach in English. The survey data also indicate other important issues connected with teaching-in-English implementation at the university, such as finance, the pace of implementation, preparedness of students and teachers, support structures and incentives.

Open access
in e-TEALS