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Abstract

Using data and statistics obtained in the research project The Social History of Hungarian Cinema (1931–2015), this study investigates the upward and downward mobility movements of women in the Hungarian films made after the regime change. The political transition following the collapse of communism radically altered the economic and social structure of Hungarian society. The social experiences of losses and failures, as well as the closing social structure are reflected directly and explicitly in many Hungarian films made between 1990 and 2015. With the help of Bernard Weiner’s social attribution theory for describing failure and success, the article analyses the narratives of these films in terms of the extent to which and the proportion that they are attributed to inner, individual dispositions or external circumstances. Based on this approach, the author states that female heroines in these movies appear to move “up the slope,” as they are pulled down not only by the gravitational force of economic and social crises, but also by the lack of emancipation and gender equality.

The Role of Information in Services Provided to Innovative Users
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Abstract

Keynote talk given at the conference Intermediality Now: Remapping In-Betweenness, organized at Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between 19–20 October 2018, within the framework of the exploratory research project PN-III-ID-PCE-2016-0418, funded by the UEFISCDI (Executive Unit for Financing Higher Education, Research, Development and Innovation).

Abstract

Sally Potter’s The Tango Lesson (1997), an homage to the Argentine tango, situated in-between autobiography and fiction, creates multiple passages between art and life, the corporeal and the spiritual, emotional involvement and professional detachment. The romance story of filmmaker Sally Potter and dancer Pablo Verón is also readable as an allegory of interart relations, a dialogue of the gaze and the image, a process evolving from paragone to symbiosis. Relying on the strategies of dancefilm elaborated by , the paper examines the intermedial relationship between film and dance in their cine-choreographic entanglement. Across scenes overflowing with passion, the film’s haptic imagery is reinforced by the black-and-white photographic image and culminates in a tableau moment that foregrounds the manifold sensations of in-betweenness and feeling of “otherness” that the protagonists experience, caught in-between languages, cultures, and arts.1

Abstract

Joan Jonas’s large survey exhibition at Tate Modern (2018) highlighted the contemporary relevance of this pioneer of performance art in her juxtapositions of analogue and virtual methods. Her process often relies on a ground or stage where physical remnants of her performances are tangible. Drawing from these insights and exploring figure-ground relations through a selection of works by various artists and filmmakers, this article aims to challenge Hito Steyerl’s polemic that we might not need a ground within contemporary virtual image worlds. The consideration of case studies will be informed by philosophical reflections as to the relevance and scope of the idea of ground within the post-digital era.

Abstract

This paper will present the role of the loops and the peculiarities of the mixed reality experience in the case of the performance of Illegitimate (stage adaptation by Adrian Sitaru, based on an original text by Adrian Sitaru and Alina Grigore). The author argues that the loops, defined by Manovich as “a new narrative form appropriate for the computer age” are also the key for the possible reality switches and joinings.

Abstract

In contemporary artworks of so-called post-media assemblage, screens can be argued to emphasize, interconnect and rearticulate relationships between various parts in various modalities of image-making and display. They can be understood to produce gesturality that maintains conditions of mediality, which is the sustenance of relations between different parts of the media ensemble. This paper is an attempt to understand screens by analysing the gesturality that they propagate and not just facilitate. For this purpose, the paper interrogates the intermediality of screens in contemporary media arts that rely on this gesturality. By closely analysing contemporary media art installations such as Solar Reserve (Tonopah, Nevada) (John Gerrard, 2014) and Shadow 3 (Shilpa Gupta, 2007), this paper elaborates a concept of intermediality as an unfixed state and describes in-betweenness as enabling an openness to continuously form, unform and deform relations with different entities, thereby producing a gestural modality.

Abstract

According to Rebecca Rouse’s concept of “media of attraction” (2016), the mediums of virtual reality have four characteristics: they are participatory, interdisciplinary, unassimilated and seamed. The author’s hypothesis is that even though 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences as seamed mediums are remediating the medium of film, they have the characteristics of the medium of live performance. She points out that the characteristics of performance art based on Fischer-Lichte’s taxonomy (2008), such as liveness and co-presence, are influencing the development of 360-degree films and virtual reality experiences. As an argument, she analyses three virtual reality productions created by performing artists, which operate with the specificity of intermediality and the longing for immersion, the main characteristic of virtual reality. These productions lean on the immediacy characteristics of the medium of film and performance by using cut-scenes, linear narratives, live streaming, but also by including the “human interface,” i.e., the actor, who ensures a higher level of absorption.1