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Determination of musculoskeletal system pain, physical activity intensity, and prolonged sitting of university students using smartphone

Abstract

Study aim: The purpose of this study was to examine smartphone-using university students’ musculoskeletal system pain complaints, duration of smartphone and computer usage, participation in moderate-vigorous physical activities (MVPA), and prolonged sitting time.

Material and methods: This study was conducted on Hitit University students (n = 387; 206 female, 181 male) in the province of Çorum. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF), the Physical Activity Assessment Ques­tionnaire (PAAQ) (sports/exercise activities section), and a personal information form prepared by the researchers were used as data collection tools. Descriptive statistics and the t-test were used to determine differences between groups. The Pearson chi-square test was used to examine the relationship between categorical variables.

Results: It was observed that half of the participants with musculoskeletal system pain complaints (54.5%) feel the pain in all four areas (neck, shoulder, upper and lower back). There was no statistically significant relationship between physical activity intensity and pain complaint (p > 0.05). The students with musculoskeletal pain complaints spend more time on the smartphone and computer than students who do not have pain complaints (p < 0.05). During electronic device usage, the students who are in the low-intensity physical activity category spend more time sitting down than students in the moderate/vigorous intensity physical activity category (p < 0.05).

Conclusions: In consequence, information can be provided about the importance of reducing sitting time during smartphone use and increasing the duration of moderate/vigorous-intensity physical activity (PA) so awareness can be raised on the issue among university students.

Open access
Different levels of physical activity and anthropometric profile in patients infected with hepatitis C virus

Abstract

Study aim: To verify the relationship between different durations of regular practice of physical activity in aspects related to the anthropometric profile and hepatic function of patients infected by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Material and methods: 125 patients (aged 55.2 ± 10.4 years) participated in the study. Clinical data were obtained through medical records available at the Pernambuco Liver Institute. Physical activity levels were obtained through the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form to classify the patients according to the guidelines of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Results: Significant differences were found in GGT 141 (28-378 U/L) and HDL 39 (27-56 mg/dL) respectively in insuffi­ciently active and physically active groups, AST 71 (26-268 U/L), ALT 83 (36-452 U/L), GGT 78 (3-532 U/L), alkaline phos­phatase 74 (47-302 mg/dL) and total bilirubin 0.7 (0.1-2.8 mg/dL) in insufficiently active and very physically active groups. Anthropometric data showed significant differences in chest (p < 0.01), abdomen (p < 0.02) and waist measurement (p < 0.01) between insufficiently active and very physically active groups.

Conclusion: Physical activity, when practiced regularly for more than 300 minutes per week, can improve the clinical and an­thropometric profile in patients infected with HCV.

Open access
The Parameters of Foam Rolling, Self-Myofascial Release Treatment: A Review of the Literature

Abstract

Self-myofascial release (SMR) is a well-known and popular therapy. Its growing popularity is based on high effectiveness and availability. However, there is a lack of agreement about which parameters should be used to optimize the effects of the therapy. The purpose of this review is to critically select and assess current literature and ascertain the values of the follow­ing parameters: (1) therapy duration, (2) volume of applied pressure, (3) speed and (4) frequency of roll, (5) type of roller, (6) the number of treatment applications during one session, (7) the duration of intervals between applications that yield the best results in terms of soft tissue.

The authors launched their research in May 2018. The search strategy included the electronic databases EBSCOhost and PubMed. The following inclusion criteria were assessed:

- English language, high quality manuscripts (evaluation in PEDro scale)

- at least one of the groups using the foam roller, tennis ball or the stick to fascial release

- basic parameters of therapy described.A total 55 articles met the inclusion criteria. Patients can usually withstand a maximum tolerable pressure for 30-120 seconds, repeated 1-3 times, separated by 30 seconds of rest. The intensity of a single rolling movement should be moderate, and the movement should last about 3 seconds. Keeping the roller on particularly sensitive areas is recommended to release tension and enhance blood perfusion.Currently, there is no consensus on an optimal FR programme. However, there is a tendency to use SMR tools with a physiol­ogy-based method to enhance therapeutic efficiency.

Open access
Are there correlations between attention, physical endurance and anthropometric parameters of athletes?

Summary

Study aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between attention and physical endurance (running) and anthropometric parameters of athletes.

Material and methods: The study examined 61 students aged 19 to 25 years, divided into two groups: athletes (33 participants) and non-athletes (28 participants). We employed anthropometric measurements and the Vienna System Test, including tools to measure focused attention, such as LVT (visual orientation performance test) and DAUF (test for examination of sustained attention) and the Cooper test to measure endurance.

Results: Analysis of the results demonstrated a relationship between attention and physical endurance with median time from LVT (r = –0.552). A relationship was also found between the Cooper test results and the mean time to incorrect answer (r = –0.900).

Conclusions: The analysis demonstrated a relationship between attention, physical endurance and anthropometric parameters of athletes.

Open access
Barriers to the implementation of point-of-care ultrasonography by physiotherapists in haemophilia treatment centres in Canada: a modified Delphi approach

Abstract

Background: In patients with haemophilia, evidence suggests that the physical examination alone is not sensitive enough to detect small amounts of blood within a joint. Attention has shifted to methods of improving the sensitivity of the physical examination through adding diagnostic modalities such as point-of-care ultrasonography (POC-US). Proficiency with the physical examination and understanding of the role of POC-US are important competencies for physiotherapists. Despite training, implementation of POC-US by physiotherapists in haemophilia treatment centres in Canada has been mixed.

Aim: Using a theory-based approach, the aim of the current study is to achieve expert consensus regarding the barriers to physiotherapy performed POC-US in haemophilia treatment centres in Canada using a modified Delphi approach.

Materials and Methods: Using the Knowledge-to-Action Framework and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), a modified Delphi approach was completed using the Modified BARRIERS Scale (MBS). Participants were blinded and consensus was reached over three rounds at the Canadian Hemophilia Society’s annual three-day conference.

Results: Twenty-two physiotherapists participated; 20 participants completed Round 1, and 21 completed Rounds 2 and 3. Four items of the MBS reached consensus: 1) The physiotherapist does not have time to read research related to POC-US; 2) The physiotherapist is isolated from knowledgeable colleagues with whom to discuss POC-US; 3) Administration will not allow POC-US implementation; 4) There is insufficient time on the job to implement new ideas. All four consensus items can be mapped to one domain of the CFIR: the inner setting.

Conclusion: The haemophilia treatment centre within a healthcare organisation appears to be an important target for addressing barriers to the implementation of physiotherapy performed POC-US.

Open access
Bleeding disorders in girls and women: setting the scene

Abstract

The prevalence and impact of bleeding disorders in women is not sufficiently acknowledged, with the organisation of care traditionally biased towards boys and men with haemophilia. In 2017, the European Haemophilia Consortium surveyed women with bleeding disorders, national member organisations (NMOs) and treatment centres to assess the impact of bleeding disorders in women in four domains: physical activity, active life, romantic and social life, and reproductive life. Most women had von Willebrand disease (VWD) or described themselves as a carrier. All reported a negative impact on physical activity, active life and romantic and social life. Up to 70% of women in all groups reported that their bleeding disorder had a significant impact on their ability or willingness to have children, or prevented it. Heavy menstrual bleeding was reported as the having the most significant impact on daily life. Women face barriers to diagnosis and care, including difficulty obtaining a referral and lack of knowledge among general practitioners and gynaecologists. While bleeding disorders share many symptoms, including bleeding after minor injury and trauma, the link between heavy menstrual bleeding and a bleeding disorder often goes unrecognised and its severity is underestimated. Screening is not offered to all eligible women despite the availability of long-established management guidelines; clinical tools to estimate severity may be unreliable. Failure to recognise a bleeding disorder in a woman is a multifactorial problem that is partly due to cultural reluctance to discuss menstruation. Public awareness campaigns are seeking to correct this, and many NMOs involve women in their initiatives and provide women-centred activities. However, a transformation in diagnosis is needed to shift the focus of treatment centres beyond boys and men with haemophilia, and to acknowledge the prevalence and severity of bleeding disorders in women.

Open access
Can stretch sensors measure knee range of motion in healthy adults?

Abstract

Study aim: There are currently limited methods available to access dynamic knee range of motion (ROM) during free-living activities. This type of method would be valuable for monitoring and progressing knee rehabilitation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the functioning of stretch sensors for the measurement of knee ROM and to assess the level of the measurement error. Material and methods: Nine healthy participants were included in the study. Three stretch sensors (StretchSense™, Auckland, NZ) were attached on the participants’ right knees by Kinesiotape®. A Cybex dynamometer was used to standardise movement speed of the knee joint. Data was recorded through the StretchSense™ BLE application. Knee angles were obtained from the video clips recorded during the testing and were analysed by MaxTraq® 2D motion analysis software. The knee angles were then synchronised with the sensor capacitance through R programme. Results: Seven out of the nine participants presented with high coefficient of determination (R2) (>0.98) and low root mean square error (RMSE) (<5°) between the sensor capacitance and knee angle. Two participants did not confirm good relationship between capacitance and knee angle as they presented high RMSE (>5°). The equations generated from these 7 participants’ data were used individually to predict knee angles. Conclusions: The stretch sensors can be used to measure knee ROM in healthy adults during a passive, non-weight-bearing movement with a clinically acceptable level of error. Further research is needed to establish the validity and reliability of the methodology under different conditions before considered within a clinical setting.

Open access
Developing Communicative Competence in Students of Higher Medical Schools

Abstract

Communicative competence has been the central point of a great number of English for specific purposes (ESP) studies. However, its relevance to second language acquisition by medical students and attainability are still to be established as the critical evaluation of the present findings may help to create a valuable inventory for practical use in a classroom. The review set out to explore the present-day concept of communicative competence with regard to ESP teaching and ways of its development in students of medical universities. It analyzed the structure of the concept of communicative competence generally viewed as comprising both linguistic and extralinguistic constituents. Special emphasis was placed on the aspect of enhancing competitive competence through students’ involvement in oral communication. One of the most effective ways of developing communication skills in ESP classes in medical schools is exposure to authentic communication using Internet facilities. The videos should be thematically adjusted to the students’ professional needs and correlate with their level of linguistic and professional expertise. This approach helps to accomplish a number of teaching goals such as providing students with the information about the framework of speech events iterative in medical and academic spheres, communication patterns used in them, and raising their professional and socio-cultural awareness. It also aims to develop their ability to perform speech activities within a wide range of professional and academic contexts. The review made it possible to identify efficient reproductive and productive teaching methods to be employed.

Open access
Diagnostic value of Beep and Yo-Yo tests in assessing physical performance of female soccer players

Summary

Study aim: The aim of the present study was to compare the physiological responses of female soccer players recorded during the Beep Test and Yo-Yo Test.

Material and methods: Twenty-three high-level women’s soccer players underwent aerobic fitness testing. Modification of the Beep Test consisted of: lengthening the distance between turns to 40 m, extending the time between the increase in speed, and including a rest period between exercise stages. During the running efforts the length of the distance run in both tests was measured as well as circulatory and respiratory variables. For statistical analyses only data obtained at maximum loads in both tests were accepted.

Results: Analyzed variables showed that all values recorded in both tests reached maximum values and did not differ statistically significantly.

Conclusion: The results show that both applied tests loaded the soccer players to a similar maximum degree and the tests are suitable for assessing the aerobic physical performance.

Open access