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Disputes Resolution

Abstract

By „dispute” we mean an argumentative dialog where each of the two parts state opposite theses. Two sentences can be contrary if they have similar reference, but incompatible predicates (SIP – sentences with incompatible predicates). Usually, the disputes are solved using force in different ways, but that does not mean that the winner is right and his thesis is true. Therefore, we cannot evaluate a thesis on the ground of its success, but we need a reference mark for that. According to the Sophist school, the individual is the only reference mark, so any SIP is equally justified. The absolutist point of view claims that there is an objective reference mark and, consequently, the truth is, at its turn, objective and unique. Finally, the relativist orientation rejects any objective reference mark, but the right thesis is not arbitrary, as the sophists thought, it is true relatively to the state of the evaluator to a given moment. It follows that, for any evaluator, at a moment of time, only one SIP is true.

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Doxography as cultural posology

Abstract

The current review analyzes the last editorial issuance of Professor Gabriel Hasmaţuchi. Dedicated with much accent on cultural phenomenology, the author proposes interpretations that develop a binary, alike, contradictory, concurrent, complementary or congruent character. The work has the smell of ancient doxographies being a truly protreptic one, as well as a treaty of cultural posology.

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Early Modern Cultural Hybridity: Bartholomew Fair as a Heterotopia of Hamlet

Abstract

As a contribution to the discussion of Shakespeare’s “appropriability” (Stanley Cavell), this paper examines some aspects of the cultural position of Hamlet on the Jacobean entertainment market, as they are indicated in Ben Jonson’s comedy Bartholomew Fair (1614). The metatheatrical features of Bartholomew Fair may be said to measure the play’s resistance against appropriating the unique and problematic aspects of Hamlet, such as the Ghost or The Mousetrap. These are deconstructed in Jonson’s comedy, which anticipates the Enlightenment views of the social functioning of theatre as a “moral institution”.

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Editorial
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Embodied Simulation. Its Bearing on Aesthetic Experience and the Dialogue Between Neuroscience and the Humanities

Summary

Embodied simulation, a basic functional mechanism of our brain, and its neural underpinnings are discussed and connected to intersubjectivity and the reception of human cultural artefacts, like visual arts and film. Embodied simulation provides a unified account of both non-verbal and verbal aspects of interpersonal relations that likely play an important role in shaping not only the self and his/her relation to others, but also shared cultural practices. Embodied simulation sheds new light on aesthetic experience and is proposed as a key element for the dialogue between neuroscience and the humanities within the biocultural paradigm.

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Empathy in Modern Drama: Bertolt Brecht’s Threepenny Opera

Summary

The aim of this paper is to compare Brechtian theory concerning empathy in theatre and recent studies showing the biological basis of empathy. First of all, a brief summary about the concept of empathy is provided, with particular attention to empathy in Brechtian theatre. Then, a paragraph is dedicated to explain how empathy and emotional involvement are linked to neurobiological mechanisms and body state. In the end, an analysis of the Verfremdungseffekte in the Threepenny Opera is traced to understand how recent studies contradict Brechtian theory as far as empathy is concerned.

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Empathy or Empathies? Uncertainties in the Interdisciplinary Discussion

Summary

The term empathy has become a linguistic commonplace in everyday communication as well as in interdisciplinary research. The results of the research questions, raised in the last hundred (and more) years, coming from different areas, such as aesthetics, psychology, neurosciences and literary theory, lack in fact a clear concept of empathy. Not surprisingly, a recent paper has identified up to 43 distinct definitions of empathy in academic publications. By reconstructing the main research lines on empathy, our paper highlights the reasons for this conceptual inadequacy and the deficiencies in the theorization of empathy that create misleading interpretations thereof. Along the line connecting Plato’s insights on empathic experiences to the present neuroscientific experiments, a broad spectrum of issues is deployed for which “empathy” functions as an umbrella term covering a net of categorical relationships – projection, transfer, association, expression, animation, anthropomorphization, vivification, fusion, and sympathy – that only partially overlap. Our paper therefore recommends that “empathy” should not be assumed as a self-evident notion but instead preliminarily clarified in its definition every time we decide to have recourse to it.

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Ethical aspects in the management of postpartum depression

Abstract

Postpartum depression is a relatively frequent psychiatric pathology that involves some challenges in the management and treatment of the case due to the increased risk of suicide and infanticide. Having a relatively early postpartum onset within 4-12 weeks, this pathology may have psychological, social and family repercussions in the long term, both on mother and father, but especially on the child. Postpartum depression is a relatively frequent psychiatric pathology involving some challenges in managing and treating the case due to the increased risk of suicide and infanticide. Having a relatively early postpartum onset within 4-12 weeks, this pathology may have psychological, social and family repercussions in the long term, both on the mother and father, but especially on the child.

Postpartum depression manifests with symptoms typical of all depressive episodes, such as depressed mood, irritability, low tolerance to frustration, anxiety, hypersomnia, but also more specific symptoms such as feelings and guilty thoughts about correct child development, lack of empathy, lack of maternal behavior. Emotional, socio-cultural and physiological factors play an important role in the onset of this symptomatology.

Postpartum depression raises ethical concerns about the proper conduct of the doctor. In this article we will address both deontological aspects such as doctor-patient confidentiality, suicide and infanticide, as well as the legal aspects that may occur in such situations. Thus, postpartum depression is a therapeutic challenge because of the multiple social, family and legal interferences it presents.

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From the advertising campaign to the election campaign - online evolution

Abstract

The present study looks at how to structure an election or commercial advertising campaign in the online environment, the strategy it must follow in promoting it, without neglecting: the large or small frequency of interventions on social networks, the type of message, the target audience and the effects sought. All these stages are found in both business and online policy. In the election campaign, the most important goal is how we can turn into voices the likes received on the social network media. During the commercial advertising campaigns, the main goal is to achieve profit by strengthening the image of the brand. The success or failure of a campaign depends, to an overwhelming extent, on the way in which the message and image of the company or the politician / party has been seen on the online environment.

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“I am rather strong on Voyages and Cannibalism”: The other Dickens and other Victorians in Richard Flanagan’s Wanting

Abstract

This paper analyses Richard Flanagan’s novel Wanting (2008) as a narrative informed by a revisionary and critical attitude to nineteenth-century ideologies, which is common to, and, indeed, stereotypical in much neo-Victorian fiction. Drawing on the biographies of two eminent Victorians: Charles Dickens and Sir John Franklin, Flanagan constructs their fictional counterparts as split between a respectable, public persona and a dark, inner self. While all the Victorian characters are represented as “other” than their public image, the focus in the novel, and in this paper, is on Dickens’s struggle to reconcile social propriety with his personal discontent. Flanagan represents this conflict through Dickens’s response to the allegations that starving survivors of Franklin’s ill-fated Arctic expedition resorted to cannibalism. The zeal with which the Victorian writer refuted such reports reveals his own difficulty in living up to social and moral norms. The paper argues that the main link between the different narrative strands in the novel is the challenge they collectively pose to the distinction between the notions of civilization and savagery.

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