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Lu An, Xingyue Yi, Yuxin Han and Gang Li

Abstract

This study aims at constructing a microblog influence prediction model and revealing how the user, time, and content features of microblog entries about public health emergencies affect the influence of microblog entries. Microblog entries about the Ebola outbreak are selected as data sets. The BM25 latent Dirichlet allocation model (LDA-BM25) is used to extract topics from the microblog entries. A microblog influence prediction model is proposed by using the random forest method. Results reveal that the proposed model can predict the influence of microblog entries about public health emergencies with a precision rate reaching 88.8%. The individual features that play a role in the influence of microblog entries, as well as their influence tendencies are also analyzed. The proposed microblog influence prediction model consists of user, time, and content features. It makes up the deficiency that content features are often ignored by other microblog influence prediction models. The roles of the three features in the influence of microblog entries are also discussed.

Open access

Yuan Zhang and Hsia-Ching Chang

Abstract

Healthcare communication on Twitter is challenging because the space for a tweet is limited, but the topic is too sophisticated to be concise. Comparing medical-terminology hashtags versus lay-language hashtags, this paper explores the characteristics of healthcare hashtags using an entropy matrix which derived from information theory. In this paper, the entropy matrix comprises of six different components used for constructing a tweet and serves as a framework for the structural analysis with the granularity of tweet composition. These granular components include image(s), text with semantic meanings, hashtag(s), @ username(s), hyperlink, and unused space. The entropy matrix proposed in this paper contributes to a new approach to visualizing the complexity level of hashtag collections. In addition, the calculated entropy could be an indicator of the diversity of a user’s choice across those tweet components. Furthermore, the visualizations (radar graph and scatterplot) illustrate statistical structures and the dynamics of the hashtag collections measured by entropy. The results from this study demonstrate a manifest relationship between tweet composition and the number of being retweeted.

Open access

Minghong Chen, Jingye Qu, Yuan Xu and Jiangping Chen

Abstract

Following an integrated data analytics framework that includes descriptive analysis and multiple automatic content analysis, we examined 265 projects that have been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under the Smart and Connected Health (SCH) program. Our analysis discovered certain characteristics of these projects, including the distribution of the funds over years, the leading organizations in SCH, and the multidisciplinary nature of these projects. We also conducted content analysis on project titles and automatic analysis on the abstracts of the projects, including term frequency/word cloud analysis, clustering analysis, and topic modeling using Biterm method. Our analysis found that five main research areas were explored in these projects: system or platform development, modeling or algorithmic development for various purposes, designing smart health devices, clinical data collection and application, and education and academic activities of SCH. Together we obtained a comparatively fair understanding of these projects and demonstrated how different analytic approaches could complement each other. Future research will focus on the impact of these projects through an analysis of their publications and citations.

Open access

Tingting Jiang, Jiaqi Yang, Cong Yu and Yunxin Sang

Abstract

Mobile devices are gaining popularity among online shoppers whose behavior has been reshaped by the changes in screen size, interface, functionality, and context of use. This study, based on a log file from a cross-border E-commerce platform, conducted a clickstream data analysis to compare desktop and mobile users’ visiting behavior. The original 2,827,449 clickstream records generated over a 4-day period were cleaned and analyzed according to an established analysis framework at the footprint level. Differences are found between desktop and mobile users in the distribution of footprints, core footprints, and footprint depth. As the results show, online shoppers preferred to explore various products on mobile devices and read product details on desktops. The E-commerce mobile application (app) presented higher interactivity than the desktop and mobile websites, thus increasing both user involvement and product visibility. It enabled users to engage in the intended activities more effectively on the corresponding pages. Mobile users were further divided into iOS and Android users whose visiting behaviors were basically similar to each other, though the latter might experience slower response speed.

Open access

John Zhang, Ming Fan, Bin Gu, Vijay Mukherjee, Bin Zhang and J. Leon Zhao

Open access

Liang Hong, Mengqi Luo, Ruixue Wang, Peixin Lu, Wei Lu and Long Lu

Abstract

The concept of Big Data is popular in a variety of domains. The purpose of this review was to summarize the features, applications, analysis approaches, and challenges of Big Data in health care. Big Data in health care has its own features, such as heterogeneity, incompleteness, timeliness and longevity, privacy, and ownership. These features bring a series of challenges for data storage, mining, and sharing to promote health-related research. To deal with these challenges, analysis approaches focusing on Big Data in health care need to be developed and laws and regulations for making use of Big Data in health care need to be enacted. From a patient perspective, application of Big Data analysis could bring about improved treatment and lower costs. In addition to patients, government, hospitals, and research institutions could also benefit from the Big Data in health care.

Open access

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How Social Media Managers for Danish Political Parties Perceive User-Generated Content

Johan Farkas and Sander Andreas Schwartz

Abstract

Based on 18 qualitative interviews, this article explores how the social media managers for the nine parties in the Danish parliament articulate the role of social media during the 2015 national elections. The article finds that the interviewees emphasise Facebook as an important means for one-way political communication and the monitoring of public opinion. The majority of the interviewees articulate a sense of responsibility for facilitating public debate on Facebook through the moderation of user-generated content and/or interactions with users. Yet the social media managers do not systematically analyse political input from social media users, nor do they see Facebook and Twitter as viable means of citizen influence on political decision-making. This is explained by a perceived lack of voter representativeness among Facebook users, fear of appearing politically imprudent and scepticism towards social media’s participatory potential.

Open access

More Than Words?

A Test of the Effect of Emotionally Charged Photographs

Thomas Olesen

Abstract

Studies of activism and political participation have shown increasing interest in the relationship between photographs and activism. Most contributions are premised on the assumption that photographs have an impact on opinions, knowledge, and/or mobilising motivations. However, such causalities are rarely documented, and when it comes to what is arguably one of the most central questions in the field of activism and participation studies, why some people act and participate, and others do not, there is a near total absence of systematic knowledge on the impact of photographs. Taking the 2015 refugee crisis as its case, this article addresses the effect of photographs on individual willingness to participate politically using an experimental survey. While the hypothesis was that the inclusion of photographs in a call for action should lead to increased willingness to participate, the results showed that adding photographs had no significant effect on individuals’ willingness to participate. A possible explanation for this is the timing of the survey, in December 2015. By then, the debates on the refugee crisis were surrounded by less uncertainty, and opinions had crystallised.

Open access

“Media Micro-Generations”

How New Technologies Change Our Media Morality

Stina Bengtsson and Bengt Johansson

Abstract

This article proposes and explores the notion of “media micro-generations”. Based on a survey of values and norms in relation to media-related behaviour in Sweden, we identify statistically significant media micro-generations. Through an analysis of the technologies that were introduced during the formative years of different media micro-generations, we propose that media micro-generations are formed with the introduction of new media technologies. Thus, the existence of media micro-generations illustrates how rapid transformations of media technologies can shape the moral notions of narrow age groups. It also explains why many earlier studies have detected a rather large span of years (1970-1985, in between the TV generation and the internet generation) during which no generational identity seems to have been formed.

Open access

Local Newspapers, Facebook and Local Civic Engagement

A Study of Media Use in Two Norwegian Communities

Malene Paulsen Lie

Abstract

The European decline in newspaper circulation has fuelled debates on the consequences for civic engagement and democratic participation. Based on a qualitative interview study with 29 inhabitants of two Norwegian communities, this article examines the importance of the local press and of Facebook in the civic actions of ordinary citizens. Overall, the study suggests that both media are important and enable citizens’ involvement in collective problem-solving. However, their importance lies on different levels, as the two media play complementary roles: Whilst Facebook’s networking possibilities enable new forms of online volunteering and mobilisation, the local press constitutes a shared public sphere in which interviewees can gather information and create awareness of local happenings, politics and volunteering.