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Open access

Edīte Kaufmane and Laila Ikase

Open access

George Tambouratzis and Marina Vassiliou

Abstract

The present article describes a novel phrasing model which can be used for segmenting sentences of unconstrained text into syntactically-defined phrases. This model is based on the notion of attraction and repulsion forces between adjacent words. Each of these forces is weighed appropriately by system parameters, the values of which are optimised via particle swarm optimisation. This approach is designed to be language-independent and is tested here for different languages.

The phrasing model’s performance is assessed per se, by calculating the segmentation accuracy against a golden segmentation. Operational testing also involves integrating the model to a phrase-based Machine Translation (MT) system and measuring the translation quality when the phrasing model is used to segment input text into phrases. Experiments show that the performance of this approach is comparable to other leading segmentation methods and that it exceeds that of baseline systems.

Open access

Yang Cao, R. Samidurai and R. Sriraman

Abstract

This paper studies the global asymptotic stability and dissipativity problem for a class of neutral type stochastic Markovian Jump Static Neural Networks (NTSMJSNNs) with time-varying delays. By constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii Functional (LKF) with some augmented delay-dependent terms and by using integral inequalities to bound the derivative of the integral terms, some new sufficient conditions have been obtained, which ensure that the global asymptotic stability in the mean square. The results obtained in this paper are expressed in terms of Strict Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs), whose feasible solutions can be verified by effective MATLAB LMI control toolbox. Finally, examples and simulations are given to show the validity and advantages of the proposed results.

Open access

Amnah Nasim, Laura Burattini, Muhammad Faisal Fateh and Aneela Zameer

Abstract

Cases where the derivative of a boundary value problem does not exist or is constantly changing, traditional derivative can easily get stuck in the local optima or does not factually represent a constantly changing solution. Hence the need for evolutionary algorithms becomes evident. However, evolutionary algorithms are compute-intensive since they scan the entire solution space for an optimal solution. Larger populations and smaller step sizes allow for improved quality solution but results in an increase in the complexity of the optimization process. In this research a population-distributed implementation for differential evolution algorithm is presented for solving systems of 2nd-order, 2-point boundary value problems (BVPs). In this technique, the system is formulated as an optimization problem by the direct minimization of the overall individual residual error subject to the given constraint boundary conditions and is then solved using differential evolution in the sense that each of the derivatives is replaced by an appropriate difference quotient approximation. Four benchmark BVPs are solved using the proposed parallel framework for differential evolution to observe the speedup in the execution time. Meanwhile, the statistical analysis is provided to discover the effect of parametric changes such as an increase in population individuals and nodes representing features on the quality and behavior of the solutions found by differential evolution. The numerical results demonstrate that the algorithm is quite accurate and efficient for solving 2nd-order, 2-point BVPs.

Open access

Walter Hartmann

Abstract

Sharka (PPV) is one of the most dangerous viruses in fruit growing. More and more fruit growers are unsatisfied with the resistances or tolerance of plum varieties cultivated today. With the utilisation of the hypersensitive reaction to PPV in breeding we developed ‘Jojo’ as the first absolutely resistant cultivar in the field. Most interesting now is the development of new sharka-resistant cultivars, especially in three points: extension of ripening range, better fruit size, and high fruit quality. In a new breeding programme, we obtained many hypersensitive clones. After testing in different regions, some interesting resistant clones and cultivars were selected and are presented here.

Open access

Md Wasiur Rahman, Fatema Tuz Zohra and Marina L. Gavrilova

Abstract

Computational intelligence firmly made its way into the areas of consumer applications, banking, education, social networks, and security. Among all the applications, biometric systems play a significant role in ensuring an uncompromised and secure access to resources and facilities. This article presents a first multimodal biometric system that combines KINECT gait modality with KINECT face modality utilizing the rank level and the score level fusion. For the KINECT gait modality, a new approach is proposed based on the skeletal information processing. The gait cycle is calculated using three consecutive local minima computed for the distance between left and right ankles. The feature distance vectors are calculated for each person’s gait cycle, which allows extracting the biometric features such as the mean and the variance of the feature distance vector. For Kinect face recognition, a novel method based on HOG features has been developed. Then, K-nearest neighbors feature matching algorithm is applied as feature classification for both gait and face biometrics. Two fusion algorithms are implemented. The combination of Borda count and logistic regression approaches are used in the rank level fusion. The weighted sum method is used for score level fusion. The recognition accuracy obtained for multi-modal biometric recognition system tested on KINECT Gait and KINECT Eurocom Face datasets is 93.33% for Borda count rank level fusion, 96.67% for logistic regression rank-level fusion and 96.6% for score level fusion.

Open access

Jan Wolf, Ivo Ondrášek and Tomáš Nečas

Abstract

The main objective of this work was to verify the possibility of shortening the time needed to produce nursery trees of plums, in view of the economic profitability in nursery production. To achieve this goal, rootstocks Citation®, Ishtara®, Penta®, Torinel®, Pumiselekt and St. Julien (from Wädenswil) were chip budded in the springtime with ‘Shiro’, ‘Angeleno’®, ‘Black Amber’, SLE2014/1, ‘Fertility’ (Asian type plums) and ‘Stanley’ (European type plum) as a control. At the end of the vegetation period, height (from the grafting position), trunk diameter above the place of budding and the number of shoots was recorded for each tree. The Penta® rootstock was evaluated as the most efficient, while ‘Shiro’ variety was evaluated as the most suitable variety. The best variety/rootstock combination was the combination of ‘Shiro’ on Ishtara® rootstock, where 100% of the budded trees reached an average height of 33.0 ± 3.6 cm. The highest trees of an average of 68.3 ± 4.6 cm were recorded for the combination of SLE2014/1 on Torinel® root-stock.

Open access

Edīte Kaufmane, Ilze Grāvīte and Laila Ikase

Abstract

Plums have been commercially grown in Latvia since the 19th century. Plantations expanded especially in the 1920s–1930s. At that time, many cultivars were introduced, mostly from Western Europe. After the severe winters of 1939/40, 1941/42, 1955/56, and 1978/79, the plum orchard area significantly decreased because of a lack of winter-hardy cultivars. For this reason, cultivars from Russia, Belarus, and Estonia were introduced. Among the old landraces, highly winter-hardy ‘Latvijas Dzeltenā Olplūme’ is still important. Previously it used to be productive and had good fruit quality. Unfortunately, nurseries often propagated the hardiest clones, which lacked productivity. As Latvian consumers love yellow plums, at present breeding and propagation of productive clones from old orchards is ongoing. In the mid-20th century, active plum breeding started in Latvia, crossing hardy genotypes with high quality donors. From this period ‘Lāse’ and ‘Minjona’ are still grown. Since the 1980s, plum breeding has been undedrtaken at the Institute of Horticulture. The crossing work in plums concentrated on the hexaploid group, aiming to combine large fruit size with good flavour, different time of ripening (in particular, early to medium late) and and good winter-hardiness. New cultivars include ‘Sonora’, ‘Ance’, and ‘Adelyn’, which have good quality, and productivity 20–30 kg per tree, and in some years up to 70 kg per tree.

The most widely used rootstocks are seedlings of Prunus cerasifera Ehrh. ssp. divaricata C.K. Schneid., which is more hardy that the common myrobalan plum. These rootstocks have good compatibility with most cultivars except gages, and are adapted to different soil types and are disease tolerant. Their drawback is a long growth season which reduces winter-hardiness of grafted cultivars. Also, they tend to form suckers around the stem. A hardy seedling PU-20651 (P. salicina ssp. ussuriensis × P. cerasifera) was bred at the Institute, which was shown to slightly reduce tree vigour. Testing of several Western European and Russian rootstocks did not result in their introduction into production. Trials are presently being carried out with size-reducing root-stocks originated from cultivar Wangenheim VVA-1, Weiwa, S766, and M633.

Commercial production of plums in Latvia is relatively small, as the area of orchards is the smallest among fruit trees. Plums are grown mostly for fresh consumption, with a small part for jams, yoghurt, and ice-cream additives. Fruits are sold mostly in small shops, markets and at farms. The main reason is the climate, which allows growing of a limited range of cultivars that tolerate the –30 °C winter temperatures in some years (about every five years). About 20 cultivars are grown commercially; the share of the six most popular plum cultivars is 69% of the total plum production. In recent years, plantations of new cultivars developed at our Institute have expanded, especially regarding the early ripening cultivar ‘Ance’.

Open access

Madalina Butac, Mihai Botu, Madalina Militaru, Craisor Mazilu, Ion Dutu and Silvia Nicolae

Abstract

In Romania, work on identification, conservation and evaluation of fruit genetic resources activities was initiated in 1970 in order to limit the loss of biodiversity. There are rich sources of germplasm located in two research centres: RIFG Pitesti with 642 accessions and UCv-SCDP Vâlcea with 361 accessions, representing wild species, local populations, named cultivars, breeder’s selections and rootstocks. Observations were made according to the IBPGR Prunus descriptors updated by the ECP/GR Prunus Working Group. The following genetic resources from the Piteşti and Vâlcea collections were used in a breeding programme in the development of several plum cultivars: ‘Grase de Becs’, ‘Carpatin’, ‘Ialomiža’, ‘Kirke’, ‘Wilhelmina Späth’ (for resistance / tolerance to Plum pox virus); ‘Vinete romāneşti’, ‘Tuleu timpuriu’, ‘Anna Späth’ (for late blooming), ‘Tuleu gras’, ‘Vâlcean’ (for fruit quality), ‘Stanley’, ‘Pescăruş’, ‘Centenar’ (for productivity), and ‘Diana’ (for self-fertility). The plum rootstock breeding programme used the following genotypes as sources of genes: ‘Rosior văratec’, ‘Brompton’, ‘Renclod Verde’, ‘Pixy’, ‘Saint Julien A’, ‘Albe mici’, ‘Scolduş’, ‘Porumbar’, etc. Breeding using the germplasm in these collections resulted in the release of 40 cultivars and 11 generative and vegetative rootstocks.