Tethered Cord Syndrome in Children – Report of Two Cases

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Abstract

Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord within the spinal column. Attachments may occur congenitally at the base of the spinal cord (medullary cone) or they may develop near the site of an injury to the spinal cord. These attachments cause an abnormal stretching of the spinal cord. The course of the disorder is progressive.

We present two patients that were diagnosed at age of three months and three years, respectively. Final diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging, and both patients were referred to University Clinic of Neurosurgery for further treatment.

Our aim is to illustrate the advantages of the early diagnostics of this progressive condition, to present diagnostic methods that are age-dependent and to illustrate the early clinical indicators for its existence.

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